Viva Espana!

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Oct 27, 2009
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biker jk said:
Jesus Manzano of Spain exposed doping practices in a series of articles in the Spanish newspaper Diario AS in March 2004. This included his use of EPO, Cortisone, Testosterone, Human Growth Hormone, Nandrolone, Oxyglobin, and the extreme practices to administer them.[256]. The revelations were so strong that Spanish investigations were begun, and these in turn lead to Operación Puerto.

Janet Puiggros Miranda of Spain became the second Spanish athlete to commit a doping offence at the Olympics after also testing positive for EPO during a pre-Olympic test. Like Gonzalez, she was withdrawn from competing (in the Women's Cross-Country race). She also denied the administration of a "B Test", which is used to verify the first drug test.

José Reynaldo Murillo of Spain tested positive for Erythropoietin in the 46th Vuelta a Guatemala in October 2004.[245]

Roberto Heras, the winner of an unprecedented fourth Vuelta a España, tested positive for EPO prior to the penultimate stage of the 2005 Vuelta a España.[268] He was stripped of his 2005 Vuelta win and the victory was given to Russian Denis Menchov. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Iñigo Landaluze, made his breakthrough by winning the 2005 Dauphiné Libéré, but it was soon announced he had tested positive for abnormally high testosterone and was suspended from racing until his case was heard out. In 2006, however, he was cleared to return to racing after he showed that the lab conducting tests committed procedural errors. The UCI then failed to show that those errors did not affect the outcome of the tests. The CAS panel reviewing the case said that it was "probable" that Landaluze had committed a doping violation, but the UCI had failed to meet its burden of proof in the case. New revisions to the WADA Code would suggest that Landaluze would have lost his case under the new rules.[270] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states 'Acquitted for legal reasons'[255]

Jenaro Ramos Lozano of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol on 8 April 2005. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Garcia Quesada Adolfo of Spain tested positive for Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in competition on 19 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Victor Hernandez Baeta of Spain tested positive for EPO in an 'out of competition' test on 4 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Santos Gonzalez Capilla of Spain tested positive for Triamcinolone acetonide on 4 March 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification, warning and reprimand"[255].

Aitor González, the winner of the 2002 Vuelta a España, tested positive twice in 2005, first during an out of competition test in August, and again during the 2005 Vuelta a España for a methyltestosterone metabolite. González claimed that the positive test was the result of a contaminated dietary supplement called Animal Pack prescribed by a doctor.[277] González was handed a two year ban and retired soon afterwards. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed 17 alpha methyl, 5 beta androstane, 3 alpha 17 beta dio and a 2 year ban[255]

Oscar Grau of Spain tested positive for Finasteride. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Jon Pena Hernaez of Spain tested positive for Phentermine in competition on 1 August 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Christina Alcade Huertanos from Spain was disqualified for 2 years. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed Triamcinolone acetonide and a 2 year ban[255]

Aitor Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Aitor's brother, Unai Osa, number 8 to Aitor Osa himself.[282]

Unai Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Unai Osa himself, and number 8 to his brother Aitor Osa.[282

Jose Antonio Pastor Roldan of Spain tested positive for Terbutaline on 19 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated that he was sanctioned by 'disqualification and a warning'[255].

Fernando Torres of Spain tested positive for Ephedrine in competition on 8 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years - (under appeal by rider)."[234]

Jordi Reira Valls of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol and hCG on 16 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Aketza Peña of Spain and the Euskaltel-Euskadi team tested positive for the anabolic steroid nandrolone on 30 May 2007. The sample was taken after stage one of the Giro del Trentino on 24 April and was announced during the 2007 Giro d'Italia.[304] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[234]

José Antonio Pecharroman Fabian from Spain tested positive for Finasteride 'in competition' on 26 August 2007. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[234].

Iban Mayo tested positive for EPO on the Tour de France's rest day, July 24, it was announced Monday night. His Saunier Duval team was informed of the positive test by the UCI and immediately suspended the Spanish rider.

Manuel Beltrán tested positive for EPO after the first stage of the Tour de France. The news broke on 11 July 2008. Blood abnormalities before the tour start had led French anti-doping agency AFLD to target the rider. Beltrán's team Liquigas withdrew him from the tour with immediate effect. French police questioned Beltrán over possible offences, and searched his hotel room. The B-Sample has not yet been tested.[312]

Moisés Dueñas was withdrawn from the Barloworld team before the 11th stage of the Tour de France on 16 July. The official statement from ASO stated that he had tested positive for EPO at the end of the time trial fourth stage.[318] Barloworld, two days later, announced that they were withdrawing from sponsorship after this year's Tour de France.[319]

Maria Moreno of Spain tested positive for EPO at the Beijing Olympics on 31 July. She left China on the day of the test, before the results were published, and reports in Spain claimed an 'anxiety attack'. IOC communications director Giselle Davies said: "She was tested in the Village and she had already left China that evening before having had the result. The test has come back positive for EPO. The disciplinary commission has ruled that she should be excluded from the Games and have her accreditation withdrawn." The IOC passed the case to the UCI for follow up.[326]

Antonio Colom tested positive for EPO in an out of competition test on 2 April. He was targeted for additional controls using information from his blood profile. Colom's positive drug test is the second within the ranks of Katusha within five weeks (see Christian Pfannberger). [349]

On 31 July 2009, it was announced that Mikel Astarloza had tested positive for Recombinant Erythropoietin (EPO) on 26 June 2009 and was being provisionally suspended by the UCI.[353]

On 18 September 2009, it was announced that Liberty Seguros Continental team riders Nuno Ribeiro (Portugese), Isidro Nozal and Hector Guerra tested positive for EPO-CERA in controls prior to the Tour of Portugal. Ribeiro went on to win the general classification.[355]

Wow you really researched for this one.i just hope none of your countrymen will suffer the same fate!:p
 
Sep 20, 2009
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Well unfortunately a number of Australians including Rory Sutherland who is doing well in the States just now along with many English and surprise Americans (North and not Canadian) have tested positive. This does not mean that all Australians and Americans cheat but fromthe outside they are both dirty.
 
Jan 18, 2010
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indeed, and I think Flecha should renounce his Spanish citizenship before its too late considering the lack of gratitude for his big win by Spanish people here.

and when you think the guy will probably be a leadout rider for Freire at the worldchampionships:rolleyes:
 
Oct 27, 2009
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sublimit said:
indeed, and I think Flecha should renounce his Spanish citizenship before its too late considering the lack of gratitude for his big win by Spanish people here.

and when you think the guy will probably be a leadout rider for Freire at the worldchampionships:rolleyes:
Flecha will definitely be one of the leadout guys of Freire should Valverde will not be around at the world championship this year.
 
Sep 21, 2009
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sublimit said:
indeed, and I think Flecha should renounce his Spanish citizenship before its too late considering the lack of gratitude for his big win by Spanish people here.

and when you think the guy will probably be a leadout rider for Freire at the worldchampionships:rolleyes:
By the same logic, Freire should also renounce his citizenship ;) The average Spanish fan does not care about 1-day races

As an additional comment to the points I raised before, yesterday I run across an interesting Q&A session with Xavier Tondo in the Spanish web site biciclismo:

http://www.biciciclismo.com/cas/site/noticias-ficha.asp?id=24341

Unfortunately, their crappy content management system does not allow google translate to work on the link and I don't feel like copying/pasting the whole text here. But I call your attention to question 23:

My question for Xavier is:
How do you see right now the outlook for Spanish cycling, with national figures running in foreign teams and a future with almost no Spanish teams?
A greeting
It is somewhat paradoxical. In the remaining countries cycling is seen as profitable and there are teams with great economic potential. In contrast, in Spain we have the best riders in the world, no television and thus no tipping companies, despite being a mass sport.
 
Oct 27, 2009
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TourOfSardinia said:
Lots of wins by Spanish born riders in the last couple of months:

Milan-San Remo - Óscar Freire Gómez
Paris-Nice - Alberto Contador Velasco
Tour Mediterranean - Alejandro Valverde Belmonte
Volta ao Algarve - Alberto Contador Velasco

Are they peaking too early???
At the end of this week,you can add to this list 1 or 2 more accomplishments of the great spanish riders.
 
Mar 10, 2010
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I think Spainards dont peak too early.The problem is that others are having problems to reach the peak. In modern training planing there are macrocyle and microcycles in a training season. Microcyles include two or three peaks in a season.

If we take the TdF the second peak of 3 microcycles , it is normal to have the first peak in March or April . The 3. peak can be during Vuelta or the World Championship.

I am not a trainer but I read lots about constructing the yearly training planing.

Lets count the Spainards in the first 10 place in 21 stages of TdF 2009

1.stage : 1 (Contador)
2.stage : 0
3.stage : 0
4.stage : 2
5.stage : 2
6.stage : 2
7.stage : 3
8.st : 3
9.st : 2
10.st : 1
11.st : 1
12.st : 1
13.st : 1
14.st : 0
15.st : 2
16.st : 2
17.st : 1
18.st : 2
19.st : 1
20.st : 2
21.st : 1

10 x 21 =210 places in 21 stages . Spainards took 30 of them . Was it bad ?
 
Mar 10, 2010
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biker jk said:
Jesus Manzano of Spain exposed doping practices in a series of articles in the Spanish newspaper Diario AS in March 2004. This included his use of EPO, Cortisone, Testosterone, Human Growth Hormone, Nandrolone, Oxyglobin, and the extreme practices to administer them.[256]. The revelations were so strong that Spanish investigations were begun, and these in turn lead to Operación Puerto.

Janet Puiggros Miranda of Spain became the second Spanish athlete to commit a doping offence at the Olympics after also testing positive for EPO ........................................[355]

If we count the dopers ;Russians , Germans and Americans top the list. We all knew that Eddy Merckx was caught three times in doping controls.

All the cyclists use those kinds of supplements and enchancement drugs . The above doc is curse to Spain and Spanish cycling. I protest you , brother
 
biker jk said:
Jesus Manzano of Spain exposed doping practices in a series of articles in the Spanish newspaper Diario AS in March 2004. This included his use of EPO, Cortisone, Testosterone, Human Growth Hormone, Nandrolone, Oxyglobin, and the extreme practices to administer them.[256]. The revelations were so strong that Spanish investigations were begun, and these in turn lead to Operación Puerto.

Janet Puiggros Miranda of Spain became the second Spanish athlete to commit a doping offence at the Olympics after also testing positive for EPO during a pre-Olympic test. Like Gonzalez, she was withdrawn from competing (in the Women's Cross-Country race). She also denied the administration of a "B Test", which is used to verify the first drug test.

José Reynaldo Murillo of Spain tested positive for Erythropoietin in the 46th Vuelta a Guatemala in October 2004.[245]

Roberto Heras, the winner of an unprecedented fourth Vuelta a España, tested positive for EPO prior to the penultimate stage of the 2005 Vuelta a España.[268] He was stripped of his 2005 Vuelta win and the victory was given to Russian Denis Menchov. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Iñigo Landaluze, made his breakthrough by winning the 2005 Dauphiné Libéré, but it was soon announced he had tested positive for abnormally high testosterone and was suspended from racing until his case was heard out. In 2006, however, he was cleared to return to racing after he showed that the lab conducting tests committed procedural errors. The UCI then failed to show that those errors did not affect the outcome of the tests. The CAS panel reviewing the case said that it was "probable" that Landaluze had committed a doping violation, but the UCI had failed to meet its burden of proof in the case. New revisions to the WADA Code would suggest that Landaluze would have lost his case under the new rules.[270] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states 'Acquitted for legal reasons'[255]

Jenaro Ramos Lozano of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol on 8 April 2005. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Garcia Quesada Adolfo of Spain tested positive for Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in competition on 19 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Victor Hernandez Baeta of Spain tested positive for EPO in an 'out of competition' test on 4 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Santos Gonzalez Capilla of Spain tested positive for Triamcinolone acetonide on 4 March 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification, warning and reprimand"[255].

Aitor González, the winner of the 2002 Vuelta a España, tested positive twice in 2005, first during an out of competition test in August, and again during the 2005 Vuelta a España for a methyltestosterone metabolite. González claimed that the positive test was the result of a contaminated dietary supplement called Animal Pack prescribed by a doctor.[277] González was handed a two year ban and retired soon afterwards. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed 17 alpha methyl, 5 beta androstane, 3 alpha 17 beta dio and a 2 year ban[255]

Oscar Grau of Spain tested positive for Finasteride. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Jon Pena Hernaez of Spain tested positive for Phentermine in competition on 1 August 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Christina Alcade Huertanos from Spain was disqualified for 2 years. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed Triamcinolone acetonide and a 2 year ban[255]

Aitor Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Aitor's brother, Unai Osa, number 8 to Aitor Osa himself.[282]

Unai Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Unai Osa himself, and number 8 to his brother Aitor Osa.[282

Jose Antonio Pastor Roldan of Spain tested positive for Terbutaline on 19 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated that he was sanctioned by 'disqualification and a warning'[255].

Fernando Torres of Spain tested positive for Ephedrine in competition on 8 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years - (under appeal by rider)."[234]

Jordi Reira Valls of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol and hCG on 16 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Aketza Peña of Spain and the Euskaltel-Euskadi team tested positive for the anabolic steroid nandrolone on 30 May 2007. The sample was taken after stage one of the Giro del Trentino on 24 April and was announced during the 2007 Giro d'Italia.[304] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[234]

José Antonio Pecharroman Fabian from Spain tested positive for Finasteride 'in competition' on 26 August 2007. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[234].

Iban Mayo tested positive for EPO on the Tour de France's rest day, July 24, it was announced Monday night. His Saunier Duval team was informed of the positive test by the UCI and immediately suspended the Spanish rider.

Manuel Beltrán tested positive for EPO after the first stage of the Tour de France. The news broke on 11 July 2008. Blood abnormalities before the tour start had led French anti-doping agency AFLD to target the rider. Beltrán's team Liquigas withdrew him from the tour with immediate effect. French police questioned Beltrán over possible offences, and searched his hotel room. The B-Sample has not yet been tested.[312]

Moisés Dueñas was withdrawn from the Barloworld team before the 11th stage of the Tour de France on 16 July. The official statement from ASO stated that he had tested positive for EPO at the end of the time trial fourth stage.[318] Barloworld, two days later, announced that they were withdrawing from sponsorship after this year's Tour de France.[319]

Maria Moreno of Spain tested positive for EPO at the Beijing Olympics on 31 July. She left China on the day of the test, before the results were published, and reports in Spain claimed an 'anxiety attack'. IOC communications director Giselle Davies said: "She was tested in the Village and she had already left China that evening before having had the result. The test has come back positive for EPO. The disciplinary commission has ruled that she should be excluded from the Games and have her accreditation withdrawn." The IOC passed the case to the UCI for follow up.[326]

Antonio Colom tested positive for EPO in an out of competition test on 2 April. He was targeted for additional controls using information from his blood profile. Colom's positive drug test is the second within the ranks of Katusha within five weeks (see Christian Pfannberger). [349]

On 31 July 2009, it was announced that Mikel Astarloza had tested positive for Recombinant Erythropoietin (EPO) on 26 June 2009 and was being provisionally suspended by the UCI.[353]

On 18 September 2009, it was announced that Liberty Seguros Continental team riders Nuno Ribeiro (Portugese), Isidro Nozal and Hector Guerra tested positive for EPO-CERA in controls prior to the Tour of Portugal. Ribeiro went on to win the general classification.[355]
Bingo.....
 
May 13, 2009
692
1
0
biker jk said:
Jesus Manzano of Spain exposed doping practices in a series of articles in the Spanish newspaper Diario AS in March 2004. This included his use of EPO, Cortisone, Testosterone, Human Growth Hormone, Nandrolone, Oxyglobin, and the extreme practices to administer them.[256]. The revelations were so strong that Spanish investigations were begun, and these in turn lead to Operación Puerto.

Janet Puiggros Miranda of Spain became the second Spanish athlete to commit a doping offence at the Olympics after also testing positive for EPO during a pre-Olympic test. Like Gonzalez, she was withdrawn from competing (in the Women's Cross-Country race). She also denied the administration of a "B Test", which is used to verify the first drug test.

José Reynaldo Murillo of Spain tested positive for Erythropoietin in the 46th Vuelta a Guatemala in October 2004.[245]



Roberto Heras, the winner of an unprecedented fourth Vuelta a España, tested positive for EPO prior to the penultimate stage of the 2005 Vuelta a España.[268] He was stripped of his 2005 Vuelta win and the victory was given to Russian Denis Menchov. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Iñigo Landaluze, made his breakthrough by winning the 2005 Dauphiné Libéré, but it was soon announced he had tested positive for abnormally high testosterone and was suspended from racing until his case was heard out. In 2006, however, he was cleared to return to racing after he showed that the lab conducting tests committed procedural errors. The UCI then failed to show that those errors did not affect the outcome of the tests. The CAS panel reviewing the case said that it was "probable" that Landaluze had committed a doping violation, but the UCI had failed to meet its burden of proof in the case. New revisions to the WADA Code would suggest that Landaluze would have lost his case under the new rules.[270] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states 'Acquitted for legal reasons'[255]

Jenaro Ramos Lozano of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol on 8 April 2005. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Garcia Quesada Adolfo of Spain tested positive for Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in competition on 19 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Victor Hernandez Baeta of Spain tested positive for EPO in an 'out of competition' test on 4 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Santos Gonzalez Capilla of Spain tested positive for Triamcinolone acetonide on 4 March 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated "disqualification, warning and reprimand"[255].

Aitor González, the winner of the 2002 Vuelta a España, tested positive twice in 2005, first during an out of competition test in August, and again during the 2005 Vuelta a España for a methyltestosterone metabolite. González claimed that the positive test was the result of a contaminated dietary supplement called Animal Pack prescribed by a doctor.[277] González was handed a two year ban and retired soon afterwards. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed 17 alpha methyl, 5 beta androstane, 3 alpha 17 beta dio and a 2 year ban[255]

Oscar Grau of Spain tested positive for Finasteride. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Jon Pena Hernaez of Spain tested positive for Phentermine in competition on 1 August 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years."[234]

Christina Alcade Huertanos from Spain was disqualified for 2 years. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' listed Triamcinolone acetonide and a 2 year ban[255]

Aitor Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Aitor's brother, Unai Osa, number 8 to Aitor Osa himself.[282]

Unai Osa from Spain was involved in the Operación Puerto doping case. The Guardia Civil in Madrid linked numbers used by Dr. Fuentes to identify blood sample bags to names; number 1 to Ullrich, number 2 to Basso, number 4 to Botero, number 5 to Sevilla, number 7 to Unai Osa himself, and number 8 to his brother Aitor Osa.[282

Jose Antonio Pastor Roldan of Spain tested positive for Terbutaline on 19 June 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' stated that he was sanctioned by 'disqualification and a warning'[255].

Fernando Torres of Spain tested positive for Ephedrine in competition on 8 July 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years - (under appeal by rider)."[234]

Jordi Reira Valls of Spain tested positive for Stanozolol and hCG on 16 May 2006. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2006' states "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[255].

Aketza Peña of Spain and the Euskaltel-Euskadi team tested positive for the anabolic steroid nandrolone on 30 May 2007. The sample was taken after stage one of the Giro del Trentino on 24 April and was announced during the 2007 Giro d'Italia.[304] The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[234]

José Antonio Pecharroman Fabian from Spain tested positive for Finasteride 'in competition' on 26 August 2007. The UCI summary of 'Decisions on Anti-Doping Rule Violations made in 2007' stated "disqualification and ineligibility for 2 years"[234].

Iban Mayo tested positive for EPO on the Tour de France's rest day, July 24, it was announced Monday night. His Saunier Duval team was informed of the positive test by the UCI and immediately suspended the Spanish rider.

Manuel Beltrán tested positive for EPO after the first stage of the Tour de France. The news broke on 11 July 2008. Blood abnormalities before the tour start had led French anti-doping agency AFLD to target the rider. Beltrán's team Liquigas withdrew him from the tour with immediate effect. French police questioned Beltrán over possible offences, and searched his hotel room. The B-Sample has not yet been tested.[312]

Moisés Dueñas was withdrawn from the Barloworld team before the 11th stage of the Tour de France on 16 July. The official statement from ASO stated that he had tested positive for EPO at the end of the time trial fourth stage.[318] Barloworld, two days later, announced that they were withdrawing from sponsorship after this year's Tour de France.[319]

Maria Moreno of Spain tested positive for EPO at the Beijing Olympics on 31 July. She left China on the day of the test, before the results were published, and reports in Spain claimed an 'anxiety attack'. IOC communications director Giselle Davies said: "She was tested in the Village and she had already left China that evening before having had the result. The test has come back positive for EPO. The disciplinary commission has ruled that she should be excluded from the Games and have her accreditation withdrawn." The IOC passed the case to the UCI for follow up.[326]

Antonio Colom tested positive for EPO in an out of competition test on 2 April. He was targeted for additional controls using information from his blood profile. Colom's positive drug test is the second within the ranks of Katusha within five weeks (see Christian Pfannberger). [349]

On 31 July 2009, it was announced that Mikel Astarloza had tested positive for Recombinant Erythropoietin (EPO) on 26 June 2009 and was being provisionally suspended by the UCI.[353]

On 18 September 2009, it was announced that Liberty Seguros Continental team riders Nuno Ribeiro (Portugese), Isidro Nozal and Hector Guerra tested positive for EPO-CERA in controls prior to the Tour of Portugal. Ribeiro went on to win the general classification.[355]
Murillo is not from Spain, is from El Salvador...Nice wikiresearch...however,I could pick 100 baseball players from the USA that have committed doping offenses, would that be a good argument for what? Spain has, probably, the largest number of professional cyclists, which we all know that all of them use some sort of juice..so to me its only natural that they would have the highest number of positives..

Back to the topic, what amazes me the most is that cycling in Spain is not really fully supported, motorists have very little respect for cyclists but the terrain and weather is actually pretty good for cycling, I'll move there and breed the next Miguel Indurain :D
 
Big GMaC said:
And who would get the Vuelta's GT status if they lost it? ToC? TdU? Tours of Oman and Qatar? Pah, never gonna happen
ToC is lobbying for it to the point that I recall some clown already referring to it as a "grand tour".

As was mentioned earlier, there has been talk of cutting the Vuelta to 2 weeks which I'm totally opposed to but who am I? For whatever reason there is some misguided expectation that the Vuelta routes should be packed with fans on each and every stage but the vast openness of terrain in Spain is contrary to that being a realistic possibility. I understand the Basque's are considered reopening their region to the Vuelta which would be a plus considering the strong support and passion for the sport that is obvious there.
 
sublimit said:
indeed, and I think Flecha should renounce his Spanish citizenship before its too late considering the lack of gratitude for his big win by Spanish people here.

and when you think the guy will probably be a leadout rider for Freire at the worldchampionships:rolleyes:
Of course the Spanish and their riders have been historically more focused on stage races than the cobbled classics. With the start of the Pro Tour it obligated the teams to take part in these races and opened up opportunities for riders to experience these events and hopefully find they could be events that they could do well in. It will take time. We have seen how the Spanish have been placing well in the Ardennes even prior to the implementation of the Pro Tour. Of course they still do not draw the same attention in Spain that the grand tours and stage races do.

There is a reason that you had Horillo, Flecha and Freire riding for non-Spanish teams. Their specialties were in races that were not the traditional focus of Spanish teams.
 
Apr 16, 2009
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Angliru said:
Comparatively as was stated we could compile a similar list for Italy, Belgium, France and the U.S. Spain is not anymore guilty than the rest.
Over the past decade the Spanish list would be much, much longer. Spain is the doping epicentre of the world.
 
biker jk said:
Over the past decade the Spanish list would be much, much longer. Spain is the doping epicentre of the world.
+1 Agree............compared to other countries such as Australia for example..........If i were a professional bike rider i would move to Spain....
 
Jul 26, 2009
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biker jk said:
Over the past decade the Spanish list would be much, much longer. Spain is the doping epicentre of the world.
man i have been gone for a minute, but the level of ridiculousness in this statement is scary .........because everybody knows that 6'6" 300 lb NFL
linemen can all run 4:3 forty's..........duh...........:eek:
 
lagartija said:
man i have been gone for a minute, but the level of ridiculousness in this statement is scary .........because everybody knows that 6'6" 300 lb NFL
linemen can all run 4:3 forty's..........duh...........:eek:
Apples & oranges.

Everyone except you seems to know about Spain & doping in cycling.
 
lagartija said:
man i have been gone for a minute, but the level of ridiculousness in this statement is scary .........because everybody knows that 6'6" 300 lb NFL
linemen can all run 4:3 forty's..........duh...........:eek:
Well, given that this is CYCLINGnews, we are talking about doping in cycling.

If it makes you feel any better, yes, the US would be the epicenter if you consider baseball and football.
 
Jul 26, 2009
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Nick777 said:
Apples & oranges.

Everyone except you seems to know about Spain & doping in cycling.
its not apple and oranges...the statement was spain is the epicentre of WORLD doping , not doping in cycling........and please feel free to enlighten me about my own country, care to share recipes , or maybe really good riding areas...

maybe you should visit a blood bank in austria, or give the ricco family a call, im sure they have really great recipes to share aslo
 
Jul 26, 2009
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Moose McKnuckles said:
Well, given that this is CYCLINGnews, we are talking about doping in cycling.

If it makes you feel any better, yes, the US would be the epicenter if you consider baseball and football.
re read the quote moose......cycling , uh not mentioned, world, clearly mentioned.....epicentre of world doping i think not.......as i said earlier feel free to have your blood checked in austria , or maybe a quick trip to italy would suite........maybe ricco, bossisio , or the killer can point you in the right direction........and sorry but i dont follow the NFL or major league baseball........but if you would also care to enlighten me on my own culture im all ears............
 

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