Vuelta a España Vuelta a España 2020: Stage 10 (Castro Urdiales › Suances 185 km)

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So Carthy lost 10 seconds and Soler 15 seconds. Appears the rest were in the same time or lost the 3 seconds. Apparently Carthy and Soler weren't paying as good of attention as they should have been paying. On the other side, Mas managed to only lose those 3 seconds like a lot of other riders, so for him that's actually not bad. Plus the 3 seconds were very close to being same time or not.
 
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So, again two or more guys are tied on time in a Grand Tour (hundreths of a second notwithstanding), like Hindley and Geoghegan Hart before the final Giro stage.

But it really is not something which happens that often.

It's a bit of a drag to check but it seems like it has only happened once before in the Vuelta in the past five years apart from some inevitabilities owing to opening day team time trials. That was in 2016 where 10 riders were still tied after stage 2 (the opening day was a TTT where Sky and Movistar were same time).

In the Tour, GVA and Tejay were equal a few days in 2017 after a TTT before Greg began taking bonus seconds. Otherwise, we have to go back to 2014 where Kittel won the opening stage when the bonus seconds were abandoned (they were out from 2008 to 2014) as he had done in 2013, where we also had the Gerrans-Impey switch-around days.

The last time it happened in the Giro was in 2016 where Dumoulin and an unknown Roglic were same time on the opening day ITT, so they had two days on same time there. The year before, there was one day where four ORICA riders were equal after the opening TTT and then stage 2 before Matthews got bonus seconds to put him ahead.

But all these instances were due to TTT's or opening bunch sprints in races without bonus seconds, with one exception (Roglic vs Dumoulin which was an opening day ITT). This just shows that it happening twice in a week in two different Grand Tours without TTTs, 10 or more days in, is a statistically quite extremy oddity.
 
Id say that Valverde didnt want to contend for the win or wasnt good positioned. Because even Valverde with his actual form should have been closer to Roglic.
This stage encapsulated the "how " & "why" climbers + GC contenders perform better in late grand tour time trials, i.e. form & momentum becomes the number one factor. Even though it wasn't a time trial, the principle remains, i.e. a stage for puncheurs late in this Vuelta turned into a battle between GC contenders & really good climbers due to the final steep climb which although short was still enough to create a selection between the top guys & those who're already tired, demotivated, off-form or just want to go home already.

So I wasn't surprised to see Carapaz going for the win, just as I also wasn't surprised to see Guillaume Martin put in a huge (& almost decisive) attack. But Roglic really was in his own type of hunting ground here & it's only the fact he looked boxed-in at one point which made the final acceleration really spectacular. But it is & remains his sort of finish (he also sprinted out on a short climb like this last week when Dan Martin fell, i.e. when he lost the few seconds he gained as a result of the race officials putting everyone in the same time, which means today's win was a form of justice considering he recouped the lost time).
 
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So it's finally Roglic in red. The committee decided that the original 3-second gap should stand because the finish was not a flat sprint, so the new rules about time gaps would not apply (counting only gaps of 3 seconds or more between the last rider in the first group and the first rider in the next group). Since it was "uphill," they decided the original gaps should apply.
That's ridiculous. That rule states that it applies if, and only if, it is stipulated in the rules/roadbook for the race. It is absolutely not at the whim of commissaires after the race has finished.
I don't have the roadbook to hand (or time to search for it right now): does anyone have it?

If I know that, how come the race commissioners don't?
 
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That's ridiculous. That rule states that it applies if, and only if, it is stipulated in the rules/roadbook for the race. It is absolutely not at the whim of commissaires after the race has finished.
I don't have the roadbook to hand (or time to search for it right now): does anyone have it?

If I know that, how come the race commissioners don't?
It's UCI rules, not the race rules. There is nothing ridiculous about it. It would've been ridiculous if no gaps were to be considered.
View: https://twitter.com/laflammerouge16/status/1322213697188745222
 
This stage encapsulated the "how " & "why" climbers + GC contenders perform better in late grand tour time trials, i.e. form & momentum becomes the number one factor. Even though it wasn't a time trial, the principle remains, i.e. a stage for puncheurs late in this Vuelta turned into a battle between GC contenders & really good climbers due to the final steep climb which although short was still enough to create a selection between the top guys & those who're already tired, demotivated, off-form or just want to go home already.

So I wasn't surprised to see Carapaz going for the win, just as I also wasn't surprised to see Guillaume Martin put in a huge (& almost decisive) attack. But Roglic really was in his own type of hunting ground here & it's only the fact he looked boxed-in at one point which made the final acceleration really spectacular. But it is & remains his sort of finish (he also sprinted out on a short climb like this last week when Dan Martin fell, i.e. when he lost the few seconds he gained as a result of the race officials putting everyone in the same time, which means today's win was a form of justice considering he recouped the lost time).
Roglic doesn't seem to stress out during action or afterward. It would be difficult to find other GC contenders that would have taken that rainy day mechanical and the resulting chase as casually as he did. He definitely performs like there is serious motivation after that stage but you have to admire an athlete that owns his responsibility and doesn't air his anxieties until the race is over; and then is reflective. Very Old School.
If he keeps that up he may have a long career.
 
It's UCI rules, not the race rules. There is nothing ridiculous about it. It would've been ridiculous if no gaps were to be considered.
View: https://twitter.com/laflammerouge16/status/1322213697188745222
The UCI rule is that race organisers should identify in their rule/road book which stages the three second rule is to apply to.

It is not the allowing Roglic his three seconds that I am describing as ridiculous, it is the prevarication of the commissioners as to whether they should do so or not.
 
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Cavagna or Aranburu from a break or Roglic or Bagioli if it comes back to a big group finish. Breakaway win is more likely as seems too hard to bet on working all day for Sam Bennett and the GC teams won’t want to fight all day for a final here where only a few seconds are likely to be won and lost,
Proud of that prediction. Named 4 riders and they came in 1,3,4 and a prominent late attack from the other rider.

Looked for all money like Roglic was getting screwed as he was so badly boxed in from 1km out to 200m to go yet once freed kicked clear like he was in a different league. Could have had another couple of seconds time gap had he not got out of position.
 
Proud of that prediction. Named 4 riders and they came in 1,3,4 and a prominent late attack from the other rider.

Looked for all money like Roglic was getting screwed as he was so badly boxed in from 1km out to 200m to go yet once freed kicked clear like he was in a different league. Could have had another couple of seconds time gap had he not got out of position.
The gradient kicked up at 200-300m to go and the front few had launched their sprint and I swear Roglic just got 5 seconds on the likes of Carapaz in the last 300m if not more
 
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I was surprised not to see Don Alejandro in top 10. Few years back at this type of finish at his beloved Vuelta he could stop, light a cigar and still win comfortably.

Anyway. Rogla seems unbeatable. He was unbeatable at TDF as well but there is not any wonder kid at this Vuelta.
 
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Even in this crappy form he would end up top 5. On similar finish in Dauphine he was 4th, behind Van Aert, Impey and Bernal, and in front of Roglic. Why he didn't tried is a mystery to me.
Haven't seen Valverde do one half decent sprint all year I wouldn't have had him top 5 if he tried tbh. And what's a 5th place to Valverde?
 

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