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Vuelta a España Vuelta a España 2021: Stage 12 (Jaén - Cordoba, 175.0 km)

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Now I might be pedantic, but no, that's not really the same. In Denmark you can only have one surname (in this case Nielsen; Cort is a middle name), but in Spain it's custom to have two surnames - one from your father and one from your mother.

In reality the difference between how children are named in Spain and Denmark is not really that big. Although it's officially a middle name or a second first name, a Dane often has a second family name just like a Spaniard. In this case I guess Cort is a surname stemming from his mother's family, though it could also be from his father's side.

And in Spain if someone has a common paternal surname, it's not unheard of that they will go by either just their maternal surname or by both surnames, like Federico Martín Bahamontes or Iván García Cortina for instance.

Is Cort his last name or middle name?

If anything he seems to be the one that wants to go by Magnus Cort considering his Instagram is MagnusCort.

The general rule is, that if your surname is quite common, you will often (but not always) be referred to by your second family name/middle name/second first name. Sometimes you get to "choose" it yourself, but when it comes to famous athletes the media certainly plays a role as well.

To me he's either Cort or Cort Nielsen, but it's obviously not wrong to call him Nielsen only, like Hugo Koblet prefers.
 
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In reality the difference between how children are named in Spain and Denmark is not really that big. Although it's officially a middle name or a second first name, a Dane often has a second family name just like a Spaniard. In this case I guess Cort is a surname stemming from his mother's family, though it could also be from his father's side.

And in Spain if someone has a common paternal surname, it's not unheard of that they will go by either just their maternal surname or by both surnames, like Federico Martín Bahamontes or Iván García Cortina for instance.



The general rule is, that if your surname is quite common, you will often (but not always) be referred to by your second family name/middle name/second first name. Sometimes you get to "choose" it yourself, but when it comes to famous athletes the media certainly plays a role as well.

To me he's either Cort or Cort Nielsen, but it's obviously not wrong to call him Nielsen only, like Hugo Koblet prefers.
But I would think it’s also preference like if I wanted to go by my Middle and Last name or First and Middle. Though just by a Nielsen I had no idea who Hugo was referring too. The only ones I know there second last name is Contador, Rodriquez, and Valverde and don’t forget Matthew Harry Goss. Everyone else I wouldn’t know. If we just started using middle or second names.
 
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So is Edvald Boasson Hagen son of Boas or is that a given name.
“ Iceland shares a common cultural heritage with the Scandinavian countries of Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Norway, and Sweden.”
Its a given name, think it is from sweden where his mum has relatives, but back in the day it was similar practice in Norway and Sweden as well to name sons and daughters after their parents as a last name.
His name is now Boasson-Hagen by the way. Added the "-" after he got married.
 
So is Edvald Boasson Hagen son of Boas or is that a given name.
“ Iceland shares a common cultural heritage with the Scandinavian countries of Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Norway, and Sweden.”

A lot of non-Icelandic Scandinavians have surnames that have a -sen/-son-suffix. Which originated in the Icelandic sense as to denominate who was your father, but in time warped into fixed surnames rather than dynamic ones.
 
But I would think it’s also preference like if I wanted to go by my Middle and Last name or First and Middle. Though just by a Nielsen I had no idea who Hugo was referring too. The only ones I know there second last name is Contador, Rodriquez, and Valverde and don’t forget Matthew Harry Goss. Everyone else I wouldn’t know. If we just started using middle or second names.
There are quite a few where you are likely to know the second surname, in fact, because of examples like Samu gave where the particularly common first surname means riders being identified using both surnames. Iván García Cortina is the most immediate example at present, but there have been several over the years, such as Txente García Acosta, Julián Sánchez Pimienta, Gustavo César Veloso (known predominantly just as Veloso since his relocation to Portugal), David García daPena, José Ángel Gómez Marchante, José António López Gil, and historically the most famous example is Bahamontes as already mentioned, but you also have the likes of José Pérez Francés, António Gómez del Moral and Vicente López Carril. As you can see, with the sole exception of César Veloso, all of these are examples where the paternal surname is extremely common or at least the maternal surname is far more unusual than the paternal, and so serves as a much easier way to identify somebody.