Yannik Noah questions Spain's sporting success.

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Oct 30, 2011
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Andynonomous said:
I believe that Christophe Rochus (retired Belgian tennis player) is agreeing with Noah.

http://www.lanouvellegazette.be/sports/tennis/2011-11-21/christophe-rochus-yannick-noah-ne-fait-que-dire-la-verite-919182.shtml

Anybody out there that can translate Wallonian ? :D
He has a brother that's a current player as well - Olivier Rochus. Interestingly, Christophe is 1.70m and Olivier is 1.65m - far from a typical tennis physique. I suspect that Christophe's willingness to break omerta is in part because he feels that doping has done more to benefit the big players that currently dominate the sport.
 
Feb 23, 2010
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Caruut said:
He has a brother that's a current player as well - Olivier Rochus. Interestingly, Christophe is 1.70m and Olivier is 1.65m - far from a typical tennis physique. I suspect that Christophe's willingness to break omerta is in part because he feels that doping has done more to benefit the big players that currently dominate the sport.
That's more or less correct. I seem to recall that it had a lot to do with his decision to quit too.
 
Jul 22, 2009
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Caruut said:
What about the evidence that tennis stars and footballers were protected during OP? That pretty much corroborates with this. What about the fact that Eufemanio Fuentes said that if he said what he knew, La Liga would be in trouble?
And "evidence" that football and tennis starts were "protected" automatically translates into doping?

Gimme a break!
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Caruut said:
He has a brother that's a current player as well - Olivier Rochus. Interestingly, Christophe is 1.70m and Olivier is 1.65m - far from a typical tennis physique. I suspect that Christophe's willingness to break omerta is in part because he feels that doping has done more to benefit the big players that currently dominate the sport.

I believe that many of the "big" players got that way by taking growth hormones in their teen years.

Both Andy Roddick(USA), and Maria Sharapova(RUS) had growth spurts that lasted into their twenties (although there are exceptions, most males reach most of their maximum height by about 17 years of age, and females by about 15 years of age). Both Roddick, and Sharapova are much taller than other members of their family.

Uncle Toni describes Rafa Nadal's body as "exploding" between his 17th and 18th birthdays (around the time he went full time on the tennis tour).

The athletes in North America's professional sports (NBA, NHL, MLB, NFL) are much bigger today, than they were 50 years ago (in spite of the fact that the general population has not grown significantly).

Are parents, and coaches pushing todays kids to take growth hormones ? With the money, and prestige involved, I wouldn't be surprised.
 
Dec 30, 2010
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Señor_Contador said:
And "evidence" that football and tennis starts were "protected" automatically translates into doping?

Gimme a break!

Of course you know very well that the pattern of actions by Spanish authorities to "exonerate" every last high level "Spanish international sporting hero", as well as suppress data that likely implicates Spanish footballers, and Spanish tennis players, doesn't "automatically translate into doping", but does mean that they are hiding something embarassing.


What do you suppose that is ?
 
Oct 30, 2011
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Se&#241 said:
And "evidence" that football and tennis starts were "protected" automatically translates into doping?

Gimme a break!
Well, if the names of footballers and tennis players cropped up in Puerto, could it have been anything but doping? Or were loads of sports stars (Spanish and otherwise, I might add) simply using him as a general doctor, with nothing untoward? If there was nothing untoward, why weren't the names, and the explanations released? And, given that they weren't released, doesn't that imply the complicity (or, at best, wilful negligence to the point of complicity) of Spanish authorities?

If you can actually answer those questions, I'll give you a break.
 
Señor_Contador said:
...........

Noah's comments are way out of line. And Le Monde seems to put a lot of umph (happily submit) in lending their newpaper space to people with uncorroborated opinions.

.
Here is what I wrote yesterday :

Anyway, I like Y. Noah, but he is talking nonsense on that issue.

I should have been more accurate and say I only disagreed with his advocacy of free doping for everyone.

Maybe what people like about Yannick is that sometimes he says dum things. In other words that he is just a regular guy.

Anyway, he is also a very generous guy, always giving his time for good causes.

As far as worse offenders concerning doping in general among European countries, it looks to me that like Spain, Greece and Portugal deserve all the bad publicity they get. A few years ago I would of course have added Switzerland.

PS: Since you were lost in translation I resent it when I am lumped in a group (you guys), I am an individual, not a fish in a school of fishes.
 
Caruut said:
My French is too poor, especially to hear the interviewer. Yannick's actually quite good for a foreigner to listen to, very slow, helps a lot. Still, as ever with doping discussions, a lot seems to be in metaphors and skirting around the truth, which is a bit much for my French.

Could you do a brief summary, please?
Interviewer : Beforehand you said you wanted the question of doping to be aired.

Noah : 1) people can get caught because being normally treated by their Dr. for some ailment
2) cheats are in the news (i.e does not make them a majority)
3) ALWAYS MORE EXPECTED FROM US, ATHLETES.
4) Doping is not a problem of sport/athletes, it's a problem of the society.
5) example : politicians who go to 10 meetings in 3 days are not tested and then kicked out if positive.

6) nice of society to want to protect us from ill-effects of doping, but thanks, we can take care of ourselves, I take good care of myself (in reply to interviewer, then she flirts and offers to take care of him :) )
 
Mar 19, 2011
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Le breton said:
Interviewer : Beforehand you said you wanted the question of doping to be aired.

Noah : 1) people can get caught because being normally treated by their Dr. for some ailment
2) cheats are in the news (i.e does not make them a majority)
3) ALWAYS MORE EXPECTED FROM US, ATHLETES.
4) Doping is not a problem of sport/athletes, it's a problem of the society.
5) example : politicians who go to 10 meetings in 3 days are not tested and then kicked out if positive.

6) nice of society to want to protect us from ill-effects of doping, but thanks, we can take care of ourselves, I take good care of myself (in reply to interviewer, then she flirts and offers to take care of him :) )
Translation into my language.

I do dope.

If politicians do it we are not supposed to be better than them or society.

They always expect more from us. True mister Noah, but you could always say no and leave. Obviously much easier said than done.
 
Dec 30, 2010
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sniper said:
"what Noah writed is from kid. what kid says is no painful for us. we get so much doping controls every year."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/tennis/15816409.stm

the most remarkable is that Nadal still hasn't learned to speak english.

I don't think he is the brightest bulb in the package.

He is 25 years old, an international celebrity with millions of dollars, and he still lives with his madre. He keeps squealing about OOC testing, without realizing that it is very strong circumstantial evidence against him. His English hasn't gotten any better, even though he has been a full time professional tennis player for 7 years, and it is probably costing him 10s of millions in endorsements.
 
Apr 18, 2010
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Andynonomous said:
Teoría interesante.
Interesante e inquietante a la vez, pero no estamos a aquí para hacer pompa de nuestras habilidades.
The fact is that the French have a beef with foreigners winning their home events. Noah should not hate on the Spanish, but on the French sports culture
 
Dec 28, 2009
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Agree, but it does say something. A lot of his colleagues speak more than 2 languages. Anyway, I think his English is more than decent.

About this Noah's statements: I think he's just pointing his finger, nothing more. The article is pure entertainment rather than info or facts.

Do you really think that other country's don't support doping (if it brings them success)? Of course not. There are country's that are much much worse than Spain could ever be.

Don't forget that when a top athlete enters this 'elite circus', nationality sometimes doesn't matter anymore. He or she will be the face of the sport anyway. Being talented only, could then lead to the last step being taken, which is being totally dominating.

Anyway, if Spain still relies on doping/drugs (only) to win and dominate in sport, then they are on the back foot already. A lot of country's use their powerful positions to get the best 'circumstances' for their sport stars.

Yannik N. makes it looks so easy. For other country's to dominate, they should just start being more open to doping. They wish it was that easy.

And yes I've got big question marks when it comes to the current doping control system. You would be naive and plain ignorant to put confidence in that.

Anyway, Spain's current sport generation success will be hard to match in the future.
 
Dec 28, 2009
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robertocarlos said:
Learning a new language is nothing that shows how bright a person is.
Agree, but it does say something. A lot of his colleagues speak more than 2 languages fluently. I do think his English is decent though.

About this Noah's statements: I think he's just pointing his finger, nothing more. The article is pure entertainment rather than info or facts.

Do you really think that other country's don't support doping (if it brings them success)? Of course not. There are country's that are much much worse than Spain could ever be.

Don't forget that when a top athlete enters this 'elite circus', nationality sometimes doesn't matter anymore. He or she will be the face of the sport anyway. Being talented only, could then lead to the last step being taken, which is being totally dominating.

Anyway, if Spain still relies on doping/drugs (only) to win and dominate in sport, then they are on the back foot already. A lot of country's use their powerful positions to get the best 'circumstances' for their sport stars. You could argue if that's fair.

Yannik N. makes it looks so easy. For other country's to dominate, they should just start being more open to doping. They wish it was that easy.

And yes I've got big question marks when it comes to the current doping control system. You would be naive and plain ignorant to put total confidence in that.

Anyway, Spain's current sport generation success will be hard to match in the future.
 
Dec 28, 2009
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hrotha said:
Seriously though, Nadal is Spanish. Spain is a black hole when it comes to learning other languages.
Yeah for some living in an old village maybe, but Nadal is an International Sport Star. He has been in the business for how many years now? Others didn't seem to have had a problem with picking up some other languages.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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moi123 said:
Yeah for some living in an old village maybe, but Nadal is an International Sport Star. He has been in the business for how many years now? Others didn't seem to have had a problem with picking up some other languages.
His English is better than my Spanish, so I'm not gonna criticise him for that.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Andynonomous said:
I don't think he is the brightest bulb in the package.
:D

robertocarlos said:
(...)
The fact is that the French have a beef with foreigners winning their home events. (...)
not really... no need to provide counterexamples. there are too many.

Caruut said:
His English is better than my Spanish, so I'm not gonna criticise him for that.
:D
 
Apr 18, 2010
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hrotha said:
You mean "Interesante teoría." If you don't invert the usual word order, it sounds weird, stilted and NOT ALL THAT BRIGHT.

Seriously though, Nadal is Spanish. Spain is a black hole when it comes to learning other languages.
Most countries are.
 
May 26, 2010
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that bastion of anti doping David Millar has tweeted;

"@millarmind- David Millar
Yannick Noah: putting the 'Coq' back in 'Sportif'.

Yep good man Dave back those that speak out about doping. FAIL.:rolleyes:
 
Feb 23, 2010
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Benotti69 said:
that bastion of anti doping David Millar has tweeted;

"@millarmind- David Millar
Yannick Noah: putting the 'Coq' back in 'Sportif'.

Yep good man Dave back those that speak out about doping. FAIL.:rolleyes:
Let's not forget though that Noah also suggested the legalisation of doping (though I personally believe he was being sarcastic), so Millar may have been responding to that aspect of Noah's arc. :)
 
Jul 19, 2009
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