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Big Thanks to Race Radio

Page 5 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Mar 11, 2009
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Big thanks Race Radio.

Another who has not posted much since 09, but have been completely educated since then.

I could not have believed what emotions following this forum could create, it has been a roller coaster - despair, anger, sadness, hope...

As another has mentioned, attempting to convince others on a group ride and been tainted a freak.
Now my mates in the bunch are still in shock....

What a journey.

As has been said it should be a book.
 
Race radio and Toto make the NYTimes!

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/29/b...sdeeds-from-the-sidelines.html?pagewanted=all

But amid the conspiracy of silence, often enforced by Armstrong or his lawyers, according to the report, a small group of dedicated cycling enthusiasts took to blogs and Twitter. His otherworldly accomplishments, they wrote, were a monument not to the power of human spirit, but to the remarkable effectiveness of EPO, an oxygen-enhancing hormone. On Twitter, critics behind handles like @TheRaceRadio, @UCI_Overlord and @FestinaGirl jabbed at Armstrong’s denials and the sport’s leadership.

More important, NYVelocity, a tiny hobby blog that mostly covered the New York bike racing scene, helped pull back the blankets on the Armstrong legend. The blog published a satirical comic, “As the Toto Turns,” to savage effect, and in a series of postings it made the case that pro cycling was corrupt and that Mr. Armstrong’s denials masked a wilderness of lies.
 
May 19, 2012
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The Race Radio has been performing a public service for years exposing this absurd fraud. He deserves all the credit he's been receiving.

The same can't be said for most of the media including CN and their forums. David Walsh and Paul Kimmage being notable exceptions. Also Steve Tilford for puncturing much of the idiotic mythology surrounding Armstrong.

Since when do you have to thank anyone for having a forum for free speech or for giving you the free speech which is everyone's right?

CN wasn't as restrictive as some of the other forums but their actions also weren't much to be proud of either.

I also think BroDeal deserves a lot of credit for his sometimes outraged commentary in the face of incessant bs from immoral fanboys. I think that it really framed the fraud and expressed the disgust many felt towards Armstrong.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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elizab said:
I haven't read everything - it's been pretty hectic as you can imagine.
I've mentioned many of you - you know who you are - in various interviews I've done. When it wasn't popular, when backlash would be the ramification for standing up for me, you supported me because the truth mattered. I'm so appreciative and grateful for all your support. You were there when some family and "friends" weren't. Thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you thank you! Words can't adequately express how much it has meant to me over the years.
The truth matters, thanks for helping to be a force that refused to have it not matter.

thats it. in a nutshell.

thanks Betsy
 
May 19, 2012
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Not at all

Dave_1 said:
reading race radio got beaten by Lance as a triathlete decades ago hence the war he's waged on social media and down here..pay back

I think the Race Radio always gave props to Armstrong for his talent.

He was also talented himself, although not on the same level.

He's also friends with a lot of other pro's so I think it's unfair to say that his tracking the story is payback for losses in tri.
 
May 14, 2010
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Dave_1 said:
reading race radio got beaten by Lance as a triathlete decades ago hence the war he's waged on social media and down here..pay back


So Armstrong got taken down for being a winner, is that what you're saying? Man, that Race Radio must have some powerful juju. Really powerful!
 
Mar 17, 2009
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Maxiton said:
So Armstrong got taken down for being a winner, is that what you're saying? Man, that Race Radio must have some powerful juju. Really powerful!

Well, I am guessing Race radio wasn't world champion and multi classics or Tour winner..otherwise he'd have more important things to do than wage social media war on 1 specific doper out of 100s in that era.
 
May 26, 2010
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Dave_1 said:
Well, I am guessing Race radio wasn't world champion and multi classics or Tour winner..otherwise he'd have more important things to do than wage social media war on 1 specific doper out of 100s in that era.

Wait till the LIEstrong myth is dismantled by social media. That will be worth tuning into.:D
 
thehog said:

What amuses me the most about this article, in hindsight, is how uncritical the US media was on this for years; and how it basically obsequiously bowed before the "American hero " while abjuring to sound investigative journalism, in favor of reporting the farytale everyone wanted to hear, instead of the reality nobody wanted to listen to.

Yet this is what happens when people need to believe in US exceptioanlism, while encouraged by a national mass media that fails to do its job. When all a couple of US journalists had to do was ask some people in Europe knowledgeable of the sport how the friggin game was being played all along and “Eureka!” what a sensational find! Even if there was really nothing exceptional about it.

The only redeeming aspect is that USADA came through with a truly remarkable (now this, yes, was truly sensational) indictment, because the probability of success after the federal case was dropped was not at all favorable.
 
May 9, 2009
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rhubroma said:
What amuses me the most about this article, in hindsight, is how uncritical the US media was on this for years; and how it basically obsequiously bowed before the "American hero " while abjuring to sound investigative journalism, in favor of reporting the farytale everyone wanted to hear, instead of the reality nobody wanted to listen to.

The article makes it clear why: 1) Any reporter who did this would lose access. 2) Any reporter who did this would be shouted down or ignored by the mainstream public and would be viewed as a cynical, conspiracy theory, pro-cancer pariah who was just jealous because he was a wannabe racer who never made it past cat 4. A third reason, which the article barely mentions is 3) You risk a lawsuit from Armstrong.

The days of hard-hitting investigative journalism are on the decline. And unfortunately, whether it's sports, politics, or whatever, the public's ability and willingness to apply critical thinking (i.e., don't believe everything (or anything) you read) are also on the decline. We've become a prozac society without the prozac.
 
Jul 19, 2009
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rhubroma said:
What amuses me the most about this article, in hindsight, is how uncritical the US media was on this for years; and how it basically obsequiously bowed before the "American hero " while abjuring to sound investigative journalism, in favor of reporting the farytale everyone wanted to hear, instead of the reality nobody wanted to listen to.

Yet this is what happens when people need to believe in US exceptioanlism, while encouraged by a national mass media that fails to do its job. When all a couple of US journalists had to do was ask some people in Europe knowledgeable of the sport how the friggin game was being played all along and “Eureka!” what a sensational find! Even if there was really nothing exceptional about it.

The only redeeming aspect is that USADA came through with a truly remarkable (now this, yes, was truly sensational) indictment, because the probability of success after the federal case was dropped was not at all favorable.
There was some truthfully US journalists that were on 1999TDF, they already didn't believe the incoming fairy tale, the had harsh questions for Lance at pressconference in Tarbes.
Unfortunately, money power forced them to stop that "BS" and to stay at home the next year. Omerta had spread through journalism.
 
poupou said:
There was some truthfully US journalists that were on 1999TDF, they already didn't believe the incoming fairy tale, the had harsh questions for Lance at pressconference in Tarbes.
Unfortunately, money power forced them to stop that "BS" and to stay at home the next year. Omerta had spread through journalism.

A few things that occurred.

Most of the US journalists didn't attend the Tour. They just reported the story that he won after the Tour and that he came back from cancer.

You have to remember the times. The internet boom, the Wall St boom all occurred post 1999 onwards. They were exciting times and the press would believe in anything.

The internet was getting bigger and bigger so Lance's story transcended the world.

Capitalism was reinging supreme and Lance was very good at playing the anti-French card against their socialist will.

The Iraq war occurred in 2002 and anti-French sentiment set in further with their resistance to the reasons to go to war.

Lance was very lucky for the Internet. It made him and the race bigger than it even was. In combination with a world go made in terms of money for everyone - on one was going to stop the juggernaut.

Now we live in more sobering times he needed to be brought down for the fraud he was and always will be.

At the time no journalist was going to burst bubbles. Its not what they did.
 
Mar 17, 2009
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D-Queued said:
Last I heard, RR was ugly, fat, b*tchy, bitter and jealous. ;)

I dunno, but it always sounds like a broken record.

Anyhow, where is the 'Congratulations to RR for winning the XYZ triathon' comment?

Dave.


or a keyboard warrior
 
thehog said:
A few things that occurred.

Most of the US journalists didn't attend the Tour. They just reported the story that he won after the Tour and that he came back from cancer.

You have to remember the times. The internet boom, the Wall St boom all occurred post 1999 onwards. They were exciting times and the press would believe in anything.

The internet was getting bigger and bigger so Lance's story transcended the world.

Capitalism was reinging supreme and Lance was very good at playing the anti-French card against their socialist will.

The Iraq war occurred in 2002 and anti-French sentiment set in further with their resistance to the reasons to go to war.

Lance was very lucky for the Internet. It made him and the race bigger than it even was. In combination with a world go made in terms of money for everyone - on one was going to stop the juggernaut.

Now we live in more sobering times he needed to be brought down for the fraud he was and always will be.

At the time no journalist was going to burst bubbles. Its not what they did.

Great reminder of perspective hoggie...
Many don't realize this..
 
mewmewmew13 said:
Great reminder of perspective hoggie...
Many don't realize this..

You only had to listen to financial journalists at the time telling us that house prices would rise and never falll.

House prices in the US were Lance Armstrong. There was a tipping point where the lie/price was no longer sustainable.

The lone voices in the finanical boom trying to write "reason" were labelled "doomsdayers" - the equivalent of "haters" in Lance speak.
 
Dave_1 said:
or a keyboard warrior

Of course!

This whole saga has been a truly amazing case of the power of social media.

There have been much bigger events, but in this instance the conversation was able to be sustained over a long period of time and under intense, direct pressure from a very organized and large professional and pseudo-professional group.

Moreover, even in the 'free' world, it was difficult to discuss the topic on most forums. The discussion itself was not tolerated at all, or was heavily moderated.

It is pretty amazing when the NY Times cites anonymous Twitter handles as being bona fide reliable sources.

Dave.
 
Mar 17, 2009
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No, email was around 20 years ago.Floyd could have emailed then if it had happened then. It was Floyd, not key board warriors that took Lance down. Floyd triggered it all. You flatter yourselves if you think otherwise.

D-Queued said:
Of course!

This whole saga has been a truly amazing case of the power of social media.

There have been much bigger events, but in this instance the conversation was able to be sustained over a long period of time and under intense, direct pressure from a very organized and large professional and pseudo-professional group.

Moreover, even in the 'free' world, it was difficult to discuss the topic on most forums. The discussion itself was not tolerated at all, or was heavily moderated.

It is pretty amazing when the NY Times cites anonymous Twitter handles as being bona fide reliable sources.

Dave.