Brits don't dope?

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Jul 16, 2010
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KyoGrey said:
I dont understand what seems so extraordinary about Englands football team failing in an international tournament to suppose they had a medical dísadvantage with respect to rival teams.

Sorry for being so frank.

IMO, the most suspicious team in the tournament was France. Not because they reached the final (before failing miserably in front of their home crowd), but because of the way they phisically imposed their will against rivals, specially against Germany.
Didn't France get more rest-days between matches compared to other countries?
 
Guys you would to have follow my entire comments to get the thread.

Summary:

England under Hodgson had no doping program. Second guessing motives and morals is not my brief. I simply posited the view as a way to explain the disparity in performances between qualification and tournament.
 
Jul 14, 2012
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Nellyspania said:
KyoGrey said:
As a non Brit (Spaniard), it is definitely amazing the pace, intensity and speed at which football is played in the Premier League, where almost all capped English players play.

I believe that England's failures in football have more to do with the fact that you simply dont have a very good Team, nor a great mánager, nor a defined game plan or style of play.

Compare this team with the 2006 WC team, for example.

Im aware that the federation and teams like Tottenham are doing some efforts in developing local players, but the dinamic of the money flooded League is to rely on foreign transfers.

P.D: Not saying doping is exclusive to PL.
You are right; the Premier league has become well known for the very intense pace in matches.

Also only 33% of players in the 2014-2015 season were English, compared with over 60% in Spains top league.

I can't see the situation changing as the EPL is such a huge money making monster with clubs paying more and more for overseas players and managers, with extortionate ticket prices.

And of course, never any doping scandals!
The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
 
Re: Re:

domination said:
Nellyspania said:
KyoGrey said:
As a non Brit (Spaniard), it is definitely amazing the pace, intensity and speed at which football is played in the Premier League, where almost all capped English players play.

I believe that England's failures in football have more to do with the fact that you simply dont have a very good Team, nor a great mánager, nor a defined game plan or style of play.

Compare this team with the 2006 WC team, for example.

Im aware that the federation and teams like Tottenham are doing some efforts in developing local players, but the dinamic of the money flooded League is to rely on foreign transfers.

P.D: Not saying doping is exclusive to PL.
You are right; the Premier league has become well known for the very intense pace in matches.

Also only 33% of players in the 2014-2015 season were English, compared with over 60% in Spains top league.

I can't see the situation changing as the EPL is such a huge money making monster with clubs paying more and more for overseas players and managers, with extortionate ticket prices.

And of course, never any doping scandals!
The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Doping is not a recent occurrence either:-

As in Everton's 'school of science' in 1962.

or

Major Buckley at Wolves 25 years before.

http://thesefootballtimes.co/2015/08/05/monkey-glands-and-the-major/
 
Oct 16, 2010
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domination said:
...

The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Although you'd probably be right that pace & intensity was always characteristic of the PL, it was never seen as the primary characteristic.
Afaict, the PL (and british soccer in general) was known first and foremost for brainless kick 'n rush football where you could still break a guy's leg without seeing a yellow card, keepers only played with their hands, etc.

Only in the last decade or so the view of the PL as tactically and technically brilliant has disappeared (with the exception of the English national squad :D ), and now it's genuinely known for its pace and intensity compared to other leagues.
All afaict.
 
Re: Re:

sniper said:
domination said:
...

The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Although you'd probably be right that pace & intensity was always characteristic of the PL, it was never seen as the primary characteristic.
Afaict, the PL (and british soccer in general) was known first and foremost for brainless kick 'n rush football where you could still break a guy's leg without seeing a yellow card, keepers only played with their hands, etc.

Only in the last decade or so the view of the PL as tactically and technically brilliant has disappeared (with the exception of the English national squad :D ), and now it's genuinely known for its pace and intensity compared to other leagues.
All afaict.
Can't access the full paper but abstract reproduced below.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/201284956_Comparison_of_physical_and_technical_performance_in_European_professional_soccer_match-play_The_FA_Premier_League_and_La_LIGA

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare match performance in professional soccer players across two major European championships: Spanish La Liga and English FA Premier League (FAPL). Data were collected using a computerized match analysis system. A total of 5938 analyses were recorded during the 2006–2007 season. The players were classified into six positional roles: central defenders, full backs, central defensive midfielders, wide midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. The match performance variables analysed included: (i) physical activity – total distance covered, distances covered at high-intensities both with and without possession of the ball; (ii) technical actions – heading and ground duels, passing, time in possession, and ball touches. Comparison of the total distance covered by FAPL and La Liga players showed no difference across individual playing positions but FAPL players generally covered greater distances in sprinting. In contrast, more of the total distance in sprinting was covered by La Liga players when their team was in possession (values from P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), while an equal total sprint distance, irrespective of possession, was observed in FAPL players. La Liga players won more heading duels (49.32% vs. 48.68%) and performed the same proportion of successful passes (76.17%). FAPL wide midfielders had ~20% more ball touches per possession than their La Liga counterparts (2.24±0.54 vs. 2.03±0.55, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show that FAPL and La Liga teams present differences in various physical and technical aspects of match-play, suggesting that cultural differences may exist across professional soccer leagues and playing positions.
 
Re: Re:

simoni said:
sniper said:
domination said:
...

The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Although you'd probably be right that pace & intensity was always characteristic of the PL, it was never seen as the primary characteristic.
Afaict, the PL (and british soccer in general) was known first and foremost for brainless kick 'n rush football where you could still break a guy's leg without seeing a yellow card, keepers only played with their hands, etc.

Only in the last decade or so the view of the PL as tactically and technically brilliant has disappeared (with the exception of the English national squad :D ), and now it's genuinely known for its pace and intensity compared to other leagues.
All afaict.
Can't access the full paper but abstract reproduced below.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/201284956_Comparison_of_physical_and_technical_performance_in_European_professional_soccer_match-play_The_FA_Premier_League_and_La_LIGA

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare match performance in professional soccer players across two major European championships: Spanish La Liga and English FA Premier League (FAPL). Data were collected using a computerized match analysis system. A total of 5938 analyses were recorded during the 2006–2007 season. The players were classified into six positional roles: central defenders, full backs, central defensive midfielders, wide midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. The match performance variables analysed included: (i) physical activity – total distance covered, distances covered at high-intensities both with and without possession of the ball; (ii) technical actions – heading and ground duels, passing, time in possession, and ball touches. Comparison of the total distance covered by FAPL and La Liga players showed no difference across individual playing positions but FAPL players generally covered greater distances in sprinting. In contrast, more of the total distance in sprinting was covered by La Liga players when their team was in possession (values from P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), while an equal total sprint distance, irrespective of possession, was observed in FAPL players. La Liga players won more heading duels (49.32% vs. 48.68%) and performed the same proportion of successful passes (76.17%). FAPL wide midfielders had ~20% more ball touches per possession than their La Liga counterparts (2.24±0.54 vs. 2.03±0.55, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show that FAPL and La Liga teams present differences in various physical and technical aspects of match-play, suggesting that cultural differences may exist across professional soccer leagues and playing positions.
The only interesting stat was players receiving the ball in wide positions. There is a tendency for English teams and players to go wide rather than attempt passing movements through congested areas.

In any event, I am not sure what this has to do with doping?
 
Apr 23, 2016
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Re: Re:

buckle said:
simoni said:
sniper said:
domination said:
...

The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Although you'd probably be right that pace & intensity was always characteristic of the PL, it was never seen as the primary characteristic.
Afaict, the PL (and british soccer in general) was known first and foremost for brainless kick 'n rush football where you could still break a guy's leg without seeing a yellow card, keepers only played with their hands, etc.

Only in the last decade or so the view of the PL as tactically and technically brilliant has disappeared (with the exception of the English national squad :D ), and now it's genuinely known for its pace and intensity compared to other leagues.
All afaict.
Can't access the full paper but abstract reproduced below.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/201284956_Comparison_of_physical_and_technical_performance_in_European_professional_soccer_match-play_The_FA_Premier_League_and_La_LIGA

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare match performance in professional soccer players across two major European championships: Spanish La Liga and English FA Premier League (FAPL). Data were collected using a computerized match analysis system. A total of 5938 analyses were recorded during the 2006–2007 season. The players were classified into six positional roles: central defenders, full backs, central defensive midfielders, wide midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. The match performance variables analysed included: (i) physical activity – total distance covered, distances covered at high-intensities both with and without possession of the ball; (ii) technical actions – heading and ground duels, passing, time in possession, and ball touches. Comparison of the total distance covered by FAPL and La Liga players showed no difference across individual playing positions but FAPL players generally covered greater distances in sprinting. In contrast, more of the total distance in sprinting was covered by La Liga players when their team was in possession (values from P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), while an equal total sprint distance, irrespective of possession, was observed in FAPL players. La Liga players won more heading duels (49.32% vs. 48.68%) and performed the same proportion of successful passes (76.17%). FAPL wide midfielders had ~20% more ball touches per possession than their La Liga counterparts (2.24±0.54 vs. 2.03±0.55, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show that FAPL and La Liga teams present differences in various physical and technical aspects of match-play, suggesting that cultural differences may exist across professional soccer leagues and playing positions.
The only interesting stat was players receiving the ball in wide positions. There is a tendency for English teams and players to go wide rather than attempt passing movements through congested areas.

In any event, I am not sure what this has to do with doping?
Going wide is a way to get the ball to a less skilled (not necessarily), but fast, player in space. No?
 
Re: Re:

Huapango said:
buckle said:
simoni said:
sniper said:
domination said:
...

The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Although you'd probably be right that pace & intensity was always characteristic of the PL, it was never seen as the primary characteristic.
Afaict, the PL (and british soccer in general) was known first and foremost for brainless kick 'n rush football where you could still break a guy's leg without seeing a yellow card, keepers only played with their hands, etc.

Only in the last decade or so the view of the PL as tactically and technically brilliant has disappeared (with the exception of the English national squad :D ), and now it's genuinely known for its pace and intensity compared to other leagues.
All afaict.
Can't access the full paper but abstract reproduced below.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/201284956_Comparison_of_physical_and_technical_performance_in_European_professional_soccer_match-play_The_FA_Premier_League_and_La_LIGA

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare match performance in professional soccer players across two major European championships: Spanish La Liga and English FA Premier League (FAPL). Data were collected using a computerized match analysis system. A total of 5938 analyses were recorded during the 2006–2007 season. The players were classified into six positional roles: central defenders, full backs, central defensive midfielders, wide midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. The match performance variables analysed included: (i) physical activity – total distance covered, distances covered at high-intensities both with and without possession of the ball; (ii) technical actions – heading and ground duels, passing, time in possession, and ball touches. Comparison of the total distance covered by FAPL and La Liga players showed no difference across individual playing positions but FAPL players generally covered greater distances in sprinting. In contrast, more of the total distance in sprinting was covered by La Liga players when their team was in possession (values from P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), while an equal total sprint distance, irrespective of possession, was observed in FAPL players. La Liga players won more heading duels (49.32% vs. 48.68%) and performed the same proportion of successful passes (76.17%). FAPL wide midfielders had ~20% more ball touches per possession than their La Liga counterparts (2.24±0.54 vs. 2.03±0.55, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show that FAPL and La Liga teams present differences in various physical and technical aspects of match-play, suggesting that cultural differences may exist across professional soccer leagues and playing positions.
The only interesting stat was players receiving the ball in wide positions. There is a tendency for English teams and players to go wide rather than attempt passing movements through congested areas.

In any event, I am not sure what this has to do with doping?
Going wide is a way to get the ball to a less skilled (not necessarily), but fast, player in space. No?
Probably delving into the realms of speculation a bit (and remembering that source data is now 10 seasons old).

The interesting thing for me with respect to comments further up the thread was that English league sees a greater proportion of movement being by sprinting (so probably a more stop-start game in physical terms at individual player level). So different to Spain but no idea if this implies anything wrt doping. Given the enormous differences in technical/tactical devlelopment, much of it ingrained over decades, there's enough "noise" for me to think that its pointless trying to draw conclusions from a doping point of view.
 
Jul 20, 2016
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the interesting stat is the greater distance while sprinting. Although it is expected, and it reflects the cultural differences (less technical/tactical players), it can't be achieved without widespread doping, as, it's obvious, distance covered while sprinting is much more exhausting than while walking/running. They also dope in Spain, but the lesser teams dope less often. Many teams don't even bother when visiting Barcelona or Real Madrid, that is clear by the lack of intensity they imprint to their game.
 
Re:

AlbineVespuzzio said:
the interesting stat is the greater distance while sprinting. Although it is expected, and it reflects the cultural differences (less technical/tactical players), it can't be achieved without widespread doping, as, it's obvious, distance covered while sprinting is much more exhausting than while walking/running. They also dope in Spain, but the lesser teams dope less often. Many teams don't even bother when visiting Barcelona or Real Madrid, that is clear by the lack of intensity they imprint to their game.
To the bolded, that is complete supposition.
 
Jul 20, 2016
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simoni said:
AlbineVespuzzio said:
the interesting stat is the greater distance while sprinting. Although it is expected, and it reflects the cultural differences (less technical/tactical players), it can't be achieved without widespread doping, as, it's obvious, distance covered while sprinting is much more exhausting than while walking/running. They also dope in Spain, but the lesser teams dope less often. Many teams don't even bother when visiting Barcelona or Real Madrid, that is clear by the lack of intensity they imprint to their game.
To the bolded, that is complete supposition.
What do you mean? You have a different opinion? Argue for it.
 
Re: Re:

Huapango said:
buckle said:
simoni said:
sniper said:
domination said:
...

The English league has been blood and thunder since time began, doping or not. This is not something that has recently become "well known". The misinformation on here is astonishing.
Although you'd probably be right that pace & intensity was always characteristic of the PL, it was never seen as the primary characteristic.
Afaict, the PL (and british soccer in general) was known first and foremost for brainless kick 'n rush football where you could still break a guy's leg without seeing a yellow card, keepers only played with their hands, etc.

Only in the last decade or so the view of the PL as tactically and technically brilliant has disappeared (with the exception of the English national squad :D ), and now it's genuinely known for its pace and intensity compared to other leagues.
All afaict.
Can't access the full paper but abstract reproduced below.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/201284956_Comparison_of_physical_and_technical_performance_in_European_professional_soccer_match-play_The_FA_Premier_League_and_La_LIGA

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare match performance in professional soccer players across two major European championships: Spanish La Liga and English FA Premier League (FAPL). Data were collected using a computerized match analysis system. A total of 5938 analyses were recorded during the 2006–2007 season. The players were classified into six positional roles: central defenders, full backs, central defensive midfielders, wide midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. The match performance variables analysed included: (i) physical activity – total distance covered, distances covered at high-intensities both with and without possession of the ball; (ii) technical actions – heading and ground duels, passing, time in possession, and ball touches. Comparison of the total distance covered by FAPL and La Liga players showed no difference across individual playing positions but FAPL players generally covered greater distances in sprinting. In contrast, more of the total distance in sprinting was covered by La Liga players when their team was in possession (values from P < 0.05 to P < 0.001), while an equal total sprint distance, irrespective of possession, was observed in FAPL players. La Liga players won more heading duels (49.32% vs. 48.68%) and performed the same proportion of successful passes (76.17%). FAPL wide midfielders had ~20% more ball touches per possession than their La Liga counterparts (2.24±0.54 vs. 2.03±0.55, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our results show that FAPL and La Liga teams present differences in various physical and technical aspects of match-play, suggesting that cultural differences may exist across professional soccer leagues and playing positions.
The only interesting stat was players receiving the ball in wide positions. There is a tendency for English teams and players to go wide rather than attempt passing movements through congested areas.

In any event, I am not sure what this has to do with doping?
Going wide is a way to get the ball to a less skilled (not necessarily), but fast, player in space. No?
Yes I would say that is correct. What we see from the best Hispanic players is the ability to attack the "D" of the penalty area but I have no stats to support this argument only perception which the report sort of confirms.
 
To be fair, the people saying Premiere Leauge players don't dope have a good point.

Weightlifters dope for a few hundred bob and a plane ticket home. Masters cyclists dope because they want to beat their friends. Amateur rugby players dope to try and get a contract for a small level team

But why on earth would a football player in the worlds richest league with millions and millions as well as eternal fame on the line, dope? Epsecially considering how weak the testing system is?

Makes no sense, does it.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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And there is a growing body of evidence that doping doesn't work in soccer because it's a skill sport.
There is no doping that makes you pass the ball better or handle the ball like Messi.
Hodgson probably knew this, and thought why take the risk.
 
The Hitch said:
To be fair, the people saying Premiere Leauge players don't dope have a good point.

Weightlifters dope for a few hundred bob and a plane ticket home. Masters cyclists dope because they want to beat their friends. Amateur rugby players dope to try and get a contract for a small level team

But why on earth would a football player in the worlds richest league with millions and millions as well as eternal fame on the line, dope? Epsecially considering how weak the testing system is?

Makes no sense, does it.
Nobody is saying PL players do not dope. The issue is whether players are prepared to dope incessantly? One wonders if the original tension with Capello was program related? With senior players being told that they would be smashed if they didn't. My hunch is that Gerrard rebelled against this as did Rooney. Both later reaching an agreement with Hodgson who complied with or even encouraged this sober approach.

The reality is that Iceland (and Costa Rica in 2014) looked doped to the max when England encountered them. In contrast, England looked totally sober even hungover during that game in Marseilles.
 
Tbf though, doping is nowhere near as effective or required in football as it is in endurance sports. Maybe you might be able to kick a ball harder and with more power, but no amount of doping is going to give suddenly give you the ability to dribble through an entire defence
 
Re:

sniper said:
And there is a growing body of evidence that doping doesn't work in soccer because it's a skill sport.
There is no doping that makes you pass the ball better or handle the ball like Messi.
Hodgson probably knew this, and thought why take the risk.
You will be flamed by Hitch for that statement! Anyone who watched Iceland in France or Costa Rica in Brazil would have to disagree.
 
May 26, 2010
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PremierAndrew said:
Tbf though, doping is nowhere near as effective or required in football as it is in endurance sports. Maybe you might be able to kick a ball harder and with more power, but no amount of doping is going to give suddenly give you the ability to dribble through an entire defence
The ability to be able to physically run at the end of a game is so important and it means teams can maintain their ability to pass and control the ball accurately as fatigue would mean lack of control etc.

Doping is big in football, not just endurance, but physique to shrug off others and get past players physically and then power in a players shot is another big plus.
 
Re: Re:

Benotti69 said:
PremierAndrew said:
Tbf though, doping is nowhere near as effective or required in football as it is in endurance sports. Maybe you might be able to kick a ball harder and with more power, but no amount of doping is going to give suddenly give you the ability to dribble through an entire defence
The ability to be able to physically run at the end of a game is so important and it means teams can maintain their ability to pass and control the ball accurately as fatigue would mean lack of control etc.

Doping is big in football, not just endurance, but physique to shrug off others and get past players physically and then power in a players shot is another big plus.
Yes but there's a lot more skill involved. Pace power and stamina only get you so far. Obviously it is beneficial to dope, but it's not fundamental to success, like it unfortunately is in most (if not all) endurance sports
 
buckle said:
The Hitch said:
To be fair, the people saying Premiere Leauge players don't dope have a good point.

Weightlifters dope for a few hundred bob and a plane ticket home. Masters cyclists dope because they want to beat their friends. Amateur rugby players dope to try and get a contract for a small level team

But why on earth would a football player in the worlds richest league with millions and millions as well as eternal fame on the line, dope? Epsecially considering how weak the testing system is?

Makes no sense, does it.
Nobody is saying PL players do not dope. The issue is whether players are prepared to dope incessantly? One wonders if the original tension with Capello was program related? With senior players being told that they would be smashed if they didn't. My hunch is that Gerrard rebelled against this as did Rooney. Both later reaching an agreement with Hodgson who complied with or even encouraged this sober approach.

The reality is that Iceland (and Costa Rica in 2014) looked doped to the max when England encountered them. In contrast, England looked totally sober even hungover during that game in Marseilles.
Are you saying Iceland only doped against England, because they drew two of their group games against a struggling Portugal and Hungary and scored a late breakaway goal to win against Austria and got hammered against France. Is the only reason England have been crap for 30 years a lack of doping?? I really dont think so.
 
Jul 22, 2011
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pmcg76 said:
buckle said:
The Hitch said:
To be fair, the people saying Premiere Leauge players don't dope have a good point.

Weightlifters dope for a few hundred bob and a plane ticket home. Masters cyclists dope because they want to beat their friends. Amateur rugby players dope to try and get a contract for a small level team

But why on earth would a football player in the worlds richest league with millions and millions as well as eternal fame on the line, dope? Epsecially considering how weak the testing system is?

Makes no sense, does it.
Nobody is saying PL players do not dope. The issue is whether players are prepared to dope incessantly? One wonders if the original tension with Capello was program related? With senior players being told that they would be smashed if they didn't. My hunch is that Gerrard rebelled against this as did Rooney. Both later reaching an agreement with Hodgson who complied with or even encouraged this sober approach.

The reality is that Iceland (and Costa Rica in 2014) looked doped to the max when England encountered them. In contrast, England looked totally sober even hungover during that game in Marseilles.
Are you saying Iceland only doped against England, because they drew two of their group games against a struggling Portugal and Hungary and scored a late breakaway goal to win against Austria and got hammered against France. Is the only reason England have been crap for 30 years a lack of doping?? I really dont think so.
I've yet to be convinced that doping actually works in football, if it did we'd have seen a far better showing from Eastern European teams in The World Cup or Champions League. Only 2 Eastern European teams have ever reached a European Cup final and only one has won it. The thing is that football is a game of skill, teamwork and tactics, yes endurance and speed help but no amount of doping will produce a Pele, Cruyff, Best, Di Stefano or Puskas. Also, footballers are quite often heavy drinkers and smokers like for example Rooney and Cruyff, they are nowhere near as fit as most pro sportsmen, probably just above darts players really

Pete
 
In the past we all know of players whose fitness wasn't great but they made a good living out of football, think Micky Quinn and Jan Molby. We also know of the forwards who failed to track back, think Ginola.

I think in football a good living can be made without perfect fitness if you have the skill levels, there are famous accounts of various players playing after consuming large amounts of alcahol the night before think George Best and Brian Robson. This doesn't in anyway mean that doping wont improve players just that if you have the required skill levels you don't have to to get well paid.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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buckle said:
sniper said:
And there is a growing body of evidence that doping doesn't work in soccer because it's a skill sport.
There is no doping that makes you pass the ball better or handle the ball like Messi.
Hodgson probably knew this, and thought why take the risk.
You will be flamed by Hitch for that statement! Anyone who watched Iceland in France or Costa Rica in Brazil would have to disagree.
I was being sarcastic;)
Doping means everything in soccer, especially at the highest level.
See bennottis post.
Whether or not I can dribble through the defence in the 85th minute has everything to do with my fitness level. Whether the defenders can stop me from dribbling through heir defence, too, has everything to do with their fitness level relative to mine.
If you play soccer yourself you should know that fitness is crucial. Being fit means that all other aspects of your game will improve. If your unfit, reversely, all aspects of your game (including your skills) will suffer.
Especially at the top level, technically mediocre players who are fit will be much more meaningful to their team than technically gifted players who are unfit.
Even Messi and Ronaldos game is all about their fitness if you look closely.


I appreciate you standing firm in this, but imo there is no way in hell that hodgson told his players to stay off the sauce.
 

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