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Cancellara and his giant ego

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Jun 16, 2009
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Cancellara may say Cadel won't win the tdf riding that way, but his team (Saxo Bank) won't win the way their riding.Cadel will kick all the gc challengers (except possibly astana) in the tt around Annecy. It would serve them right for riding so negatively.
An old saying "Fortune favours the brave".
Cadel should keep reminding himself that because one of his attacks will pay off for him.:)
 
Apr 11, 2009
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issoisso said:
Just noticed this topic.

How's this for ego: According to Kim Andersen, on friday's stage it turns out Cancellara didn't have a second puncture....he got dropped because he refused to go on until they gave him a yellow wheel. He wouldn't ride without a fully yellow-styled bike, being the yellow jersey.

Wow.

Well, that says a lot. Wow.
 
Jul 12, 2009
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Parrot23 said:
Well, that says a lot. Wow.

This doesn’t tell you anything cos it is not true. Cancellara went with 2 yellow wheels into the race. First the rear wheel was replaced by a black one. Thereafter the front wheel. Hence he crossed the line with two black rims.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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frizzlefry said:
Did you read my post. I said "serious attack". When has Cadel ever put in a serious attack??? Just so you know a serious attack is what AC did the other day. No one could even come close to matching that attack. LA was probably the only that might be able to, but he stayed on the wheel as he should have.
I want to see Evans do what AC did the other day, its just that he doesnt have it in him. Yea you can say he's not a pure climber and I say then he needs to become LA's towel boy.

All said from the comfort of an arm-chair ;) Dude.... you clearly have NO understanding of racing at this level....to much time in the arm-chair maybe??
 
Mar 12, 2009
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The Dr said:
All said from the comfort of an arm-chair ;) Dude.... you clearly have NO understanding of racing at this level....to much time in the arm-chair maybe??

Frizzlefry and his ilk are why we have the ignore button ;)
 
Jun 18, 2009
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The Dr said:
All said from the comfort of an arm-chair ;) Dude.... you clearly have NO understanding of racing at this level....to much time in the arm-chair maybe??

+1......... at least when fizzlefry posts something we can have a bit of a laugh at his ignorance!
 
Mar 13, 2009
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a real attack must be a successful attack, interesting point of view. I remember watching rasmussen and contador in 2007, it was so dull contador didn't really attack.

I think every hopeful GC team had something to gain cadel going away, if he may steal your GC place, then after Astana have kept him in check put your guys on the front to pull him back...or you can try to get schleklet to attack 4 rested Astana powerhouses...that went well.

If there was someone was upset in that break it should have been someone from a team with no GC aspirations. Hushovd would have been allowed the points except by hincapie, cadel probably would have led him out if asked :p they didn't complain though.

Maybe there have been too many years of formulaic racing and multiple mountaintop finishes to separate the contenders. Riders and directors need to adapt to a tour without so many opportunities.
 
Apr 1, 2009
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Cobber said:
+1......... at least when fizzlefry posts something we can have a bit of a laugh at his ignorance!

"fizzlefry" is female.
Used to be called "musette" at cyclingforums.com
She used to stalk Armstrong until he took out an intervention order.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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always been a fan of Cancellara and not really found him to have a big ego. Spoke to him a few times via e-mail in the past so at least he talks to some of his fans. Can't blame him for telling Evans to fall back as the break wouldn't work with Evans in there and he can hardly help another rival gain time
 
Mar 18, 2009
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sherer said:
always been a fan of Cancellara and not really found him to have a big ego. Spoke to him a few times via e-mail in the past so at least he talks to some of his fans. Can't blame him for telling Evans to fall back as the break wouldn't work with Evans in there and he can hardly help another rival gain time

Cancellara joined the break, not Evans. If he didn't want to be there, then he shouldn't have moved up into the break. If he wanted to shut it down, then he should have done just that without the histrionics. Cancellara is one of my favourite riders, but he dropped a notch or two with such childish behaviour.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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elapid said:
Cancellara joined the break, not Evans. If he didn't want to be there, then he shouldn't have moved up into the break. If he wanted to shut it down, then he should have done just that without the histrionics. Cancellara is one of my favourite riders, but he dropped a notch or two with such childish behaviour.

Agreed! Cancellara was behaving like a 3yo having a hissy fit. Last time I checked the Tour was a bike RACE, and you can't blame Cadel for having a go. Cancellara et al rode across to Cadels group and then had the cheek to tell him to go back. I think you'll find it had as much to do with Cancellaras ego as it did with Cancellara being on the same team as the Schleck brothers,
 
Jun 22, 2009
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The Dr said:
Agreed! Cancellara was behaving like a 3yo having a hissy fit. Last time I checked the Tour was a bike RACE, and you can't blame Cadel for having a go. Cancellara et al rode across to Cadels group and then had the cheek to tell him to go back. I think you'll find it had as much to do with Cancellaras ego as it did with Cancellara being on the same team as the Schleck brothers,

No!

It had everything to do with Evans breaking one of the 'unwritten laws' of the peloton, that GC riders are not 'tolerated' in breakaways of lesser Gods. Evans knew damn well that he had no business being in that early breakaway because there was no way any of the controlling teams would let him get away and build up a lead, so the efforts of all the others would be doomed to quick failure as long as he was there. He knew this, he shouldn't have wasted his energy. Silly Cadel.
 
Jul 7, 2009
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Hugh Januss said:
I saw it, I am completely mystified as to why Evans would attack at that point in the race. Did he think maybe he could outride the entire Astana team not to mention the odd helper that Saxo, Cervelo etc might decide to throw on the front if it did begin to look like he was winning the battle with Astana? And if he did, after 100 miles all out how would he keep up the next day in the mountains? Maybe this is why he's never attacked before? And maybe that has been a good thing for his career?

Evans is a great cyclist and I really want to see the man in yellow in Paris, but he is desperate. It seemed like he was crying in front of the reporters at the top of Arcalis "Please, don't anyone ask why I didn't attack"

I cheer for the guy, but he seems pretty unstable.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Amsterhammer said:
No!

It had everything to do with Evans breaking one of the 'unwritten laws' of the peloton, that GC riders are not 'tolerated' in breakaways of lesser Gods. Evans knew damn well that he had no business being in that early breakaway because there was no way any of the controlling teams would let him get away and build up a lead, so the efforts of all the others would be doomed to quick failure as long as he was there. He knew this, he shouldn't have wasted his energy. Silly Cadel.

He didn't join the breakaway, they joined him. I still think it was tactically poor for garmin, saxo, cervelo and columbia not to force the pace a little and wear out a few astana boys...then if you decide you want Cadel back stop working in the break and allow him to be pulled back late, then you have one tired Cadel and a number of tired astana folk, who is the winner here?
 
Apr 29, 2009
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Amsterhammer said:
No!
It had everything to do with Evans breaking one of the 'unwritten laws' of the peloton. Silly Cadel.
What a load of cr^p! The Schleck boys both went with Cadel when the break initiated but for some reason they decided then to go back; I bet Cancellara wouldn't have raced up there if they had still been in the breakaway.

Silly Cadel?? The only way to break down the Astana foursome is to make them work it. Who cares if he didn't succeed, he is giving it a go.

You may like watching everyone holding hands and wheel-sucking to the finish but I don't.
Cadel is a great guy and I do support him; do I think he can win? Almost impossible but he will sure as hell never give up.:eek:
 
Apr 27, 2009
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Amsterhammer said:
No!

It had everything to do with Evans breaking one of the 'unwritten laws' of the peloton, that GC riders are not 'tolerated' in breakaways of lesser Gods. Evans knew damn well that he had no business being in that early breakaway because there was no way any of the controlling teams would let him get away and build up a lead, so the efforts of all the others would be doomed to quick failure as long as he was there. He knew this, he shouldn't have wasted his energy. Silly Cadel.

Rules were made to be broken. He who dares wins. :D
 
Jun 22, 2009
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TibetT said:
Rules were made to be broken. He who dares wins. :D

For sure, but you have to know when it's possible to break them, and that's not right at the start of a mountain stage together with a bunch of others who are no threat to the GC. Doomed, I tell ya. ;)
 
Mar 18, 2009
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Amsterhammer said:
No!

It had everything to do with Evans breaking one of the 'unwritten laws' of the peloton, that GC riders are not 'tolerated' in breakaways of lesser Gods. Evans knew damn well that he had no business being in that early breakaway because there was no way any of the controlling teams would let him get away and build up a lead, so the efforts of all the others would be doomed to quick failure as long as he was there. He knew this, he shouldn't have wasted his energy. Silly Cadel.

While his break may have been doomed, he was at least trying his hardest to make back lost time. He is desperate, and it will take desperate measures. Better to try and fail than not to try at all. In regards to the so-called unwritten rules, Luis León Sánchez, an outside chance for the overall, was allowed to get into a break and win on the same stage. He now sits in 11th, only 2:16 minutes behind Nocentini. Evans is 18th at 3:06 minutes. Your unwritten laws are unwritten for a reason - they are BS.
 
Apr 27, 2009
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Agreed if Cadel plays by the rules his has zero chance. His decision to throw some caution to the wind to try and get back into the top 10 on GC is a concern for all the other GC guys. Constant attackes upset the uncertainly of where the GC should hold their battles.

By the way has anyone seen LAs comments on the stage 8 attack. What do you make of it??
 
Apr 11, 2009
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Yes, Cadel is dealing with the low-odds hand that has been dealt to him following the TTT. Silly for him just to ride behind the Astana procession to the end of the Tour: one thing we all know is he will lose that way. So he has to go for the lower odds/surprise plays. Good for him.
 
Jun 22, 2009
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elapid said:
While his break may have been doomed, he was at least trying his hardest to make back lost time. He is desperate, and it will take desperate measures. Better to try and fail than not to try at all. In regards to the so-called unwritten rules, Luis León Sánchez, an outside chance for the overall, was allowed to get into a break and win on the same stage. He now sits in 11th, only 2:16 minutes behind Nocentini. Evans is 18th at 3:06 minutes. Your unwritten laws are unwritten for a reason - they are BS.

Oh come on, man. You don't seriously think that L-L is seen by any of the serious contenders as being one of 'them'? Evans is, that's the difference.

I didn't make the 'unwritten laws' of the peloton up. The point I made was expressed by every ex-pro that I've heard commentating.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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TibetT said:
By the way has anyone seen LAs comments on the stage 8 attack. What do you make of it??

Lance is basically agreeing with most of us. Cadel has to try unconventional tactics in order to make back time on the Astana boys. Unfortunately, for Cadel, Sastre and Schleck fans, there are only so many days left to be able to do this effectively.
 
The Colnago Kid said:
And who was the cyclist that softened up the leading contenders by launching the 1st attack? Evans. And who chased that attack down? Caisse d'Epargne - Contador's real domestiques. Who launched the second attack? Evans' team mate. Contador doesn't take those 21 seconds without the attacks launched by Silence-Lotto.


Maybe the secret to a successful attack is not to simply attack but to time it properly. Contador waited till Evans was still recovering from his first attack and Van Den Broek was in the middle of his before launching his successful effort. Evans should be commended for increasing the aggression in his riding.
Now he just needs a little tactical guidance from his DS provided Sargent has any of that because he hasn't shown much in the past during the Tour.