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Teams & Riders Chris Froome Discussion Thread.

Page 331 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.

Is Froome over the hill?

  • Yes.

    Votes: 28 35.4%
  • No, the GC finished 40 minutes ago but Froomie is still climbing it

    Votes: 45 57.0%
  • No he is totally winning the Vuelta

    Votes: 18 22.8%

  • Total voters
    79
Re: Re:

El Pistolero said:
Kokoso said:
King Of Molehill said:
Since we're comparing apples to oranges I believe that 'legends' (on a global scale) tend to have personalities that are as big, if not bigger, than their palmarès. It gives them that lasting power because more people tend to write about them for as long as they are alive and after they die, whether in or out of the sport they competed in. It has as much to do with what they do off the bike as they do on it. The only riders in the current peloton that I would argue have that combination are:

Peter Sagan
What kind of big personality Sagan has? How do one even recognize big personality and what that means?

He's handsome, playful, funny, charismatic and not afraid to attack far from the finish-line. All qualities Chris Froome severely lacks.

Truth be told, one thing that Froome doesn't lack is powder in his guns, as we clearly saw today. Maybe he can lend some of it to Contador? :p
 
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Re: Re:

lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
Kokoso said:
King Of Molehill said:
Since we're comparing apples to oranges I believe that 'legends' (on a global scale) tend to have personalities that are as big, if not bigger, than their palmarès. It gives them that lasting power because more people tend to write about them for as long as they are alive and after they die, whether in or out of the sport they competed in. It has as much to do with what they do off the bike as they do on it. The only riders in the current peloton that I would argue have that combination are:

Peter Sagan
What kind of big personality Sagan has? How do one even recognize big personality and what that means?

He's handsome, playful, funny, charismatic and not afraid to attack far from the finish-line. All qualities Chris Froome severely lacks.

Truth be told, one thing that Froome doesn't lack is powder in his guns, as we clearly saw today. Maybe he can lend some of it to Contador? :p

Different peaks. Froome was nowhere in the junior, espoirs and first 5 years of his pro career. Contador was the top GT riders from 2007 till 2011.

For the record, I think Contador also lacks charisma off the bike. Cycling desperately needs more Sagans.

I can only talk about the people I've come into contact with, but almost none of them like Froome. Almost everyone likes Sagan.
 
Re: Re:

El Pistolero said:
lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
Kokoso said:
King Of Molehill said:
Since we're comparing apples to oranges I believe that 'legends' (on a global scale) tend to have personalities that are as big, if not bigger, than their palmarès. It gives them that lasting power because more people tend to write about them for as long as they are alive and after they die, whether in or out of the sport they competed in. It has as much to do with what they do off the bike as they do on it. The only riders in the current peloton that I would argue have that combination are:

Peter Sagan
What kind of big personality Sagan has? How do one even recognize big personality and what that means?

He's handsome, playful, funny, charismatic and not afraid to attack far from the finish-line. All qualities Chris Froome severely lacks.

Truth be told, one thing that Froome doesn't lack is powder in his guns, as we clearly saw today. Maybe he can lend some of it to Contador? :p

Different peaks. Froome was nowhere in the junior, espoirs and first 5 years of his pro career. Contador was the top GT riders from 2007 till 2011.

For the record, I think Contador also lacks charisma off the bike. Cycling desperately needs more Sagans.

I prefer 1000 times people as Froome than Sagan, but I understand...

Froome is polite, humble, mentaly strong.. Sagan is kinda a clow and just talent.
 
Re: Re:

El Pistolero said:
lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
Kokoso said:
King Of Molehill said:
Since we're comparing apples to oranges I believe that 'legends' (on a global scale) tend to have personalities that are as big, if not bigger, than their palmarès. It gives them that lasting power because more people tend to write about them for as long as they are alive and after they die, whether in or out of the sport they competed in. It has as much to do with what they do off the bike as they do on it. The only riders in the current peloton that I would argue have that combination are:

Peter Sagan
What kind of big personality Sagan has? How do one even recognize big personality and what that means?

He's handsome, playful, funny, charismatic and not afraid to attack far from the finish-line. All qualities Chris Froome severely lacks.

Truth be told, one thing that Froome doesn't lack is powder in his guns, as we clearly saw today. Maybe he can lend some of it to Contador? :p

Different peaks. Froome was nowhere in the junior, espoirs and first 5 years of his pro career. Contador was the top GT riders from 2007 till 2011.

For the record, I think Contador also lacks charisma off the bike. Cycling desperately needs more Sagans.

I can only talk about the people I've come into contact with, but almost none of them like Froome. Almost everyone likes Sagan.

The excuse now is different peaks?
 
Froome must be careful with his way to ride. it is quite dangerous for its interest.

When he is the stronger as toay or when the rival want to collaborate, as porte today is ok, perfect.

But this way to ride that didnt stop to keep pacing till the end is useless is your rival is close to your level. He did the ame than ever in Farrapona and Ancares in la Vuelta and there didnt work for that reason...

He is too predictable, even when he cant follow the first attacks, you know that later he will catch that group and he will attack little bit later, becouse once he warn up, he cant stop and follow wheels...

This way works out very well with an strong train team or if he is the stronger clearly...but it has its danger.
 
Re: Re:

El Pistolero said:
The excuse now is different peaks?

How else can you explain how a mediocre rider turns into the world's best climber and tt specialist in the season his contract expires?

I can ask you something a little different: how can you explain why a rider, who no one knew prior to 2011, beat Contador 2 times in the greatest GT of all? Maybe Froome is having a 4 year-long peak, while Contador is having a 5 year-long off-peak? Perhaps Contador doesn't have it anymore, especially since his ban?
 
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Re: Re:

lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
The excuse now is different peaks?

How else can you explain how a mediocre rider turns into the world's best climber and tt specialist in the season his contract expires?

I can ask you something a little different: how can you explain why a rider, who no one knew prior to 2011, beat Contador 2 times in the greatest GT of all? Maybe Froome is having a 4 year-long peak, while Contador is having a 5 year-long off-peak? Perhaps Contador doesn't have it anymore, especially since his ban?

Contador has won 3 GTs since his ban. The active rider with the second most GT wins in his entire career "only" has 4 GT wins in total. In 2013 Contador simply wasn't in shape all year (plenty of other riders besides Froome beat him) and in 2015 he was tired from the Giro.
 
Re:

Taxus4a said:
Froome must be careful with his way to ride. it is quite dangerous for its interest.

When he is the stronger as toay or when the rival want to collaborate, as porte today is ok, perfect.

But this way to ride that didnt stop to keep pacing till the end is useless is your rival is close to your level. He did the ame than ever in Farrapona and Ancares in la Vuelta and there didnt work for that reason...

He is too predictable, even when he cant follow the first attacks, you know that later he will catch that group and he will attack little bit later, becouse once he warn up, he cant stop and follow wheels...

This way works out very well with an strong train team or if he is the stronger clearly...but it has its danger.

Taxus, you and I both know the solution for that. His name? MIKEL LANDA ;)
 
Re: Re:

El Pistolero said:
lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
The excuse now is different peaks?

How else can you explain how a mediocre rider turns into the world's best climber and tt specialist in the season his contract expires?

I can ask you something a little different: how can you explain why a rider, who no one knew prior to 2011, beat Contador 2 times in the greatest GT of all? Maybe Froome is having a 4 year-long peak, while Contador is having a 5 year-long off-peak? Perhaps Contador doesn't have it anymore, especially since his ban?

Contador has won 3 GTs since his ban. The active rider with the second most GT wins in his entire career "only" has 4 GT wins in total. In 2013 Contador simply wasn't in shape all year (plenty of other riders besides Froome beat him) and in 2015 he was tired from the Giro.

True, Contador is the rider who won the largest amount of GTs since 2012. However, he won 0 Tours since 2009.
You can justify everything you want, but the Tour is the greatest GT of all and Contador simply hasn't delivered good performances there, at least, good enough to win it. Whether that's due to lack of form, lack of capacity, or lack of something else is irrelevant to the point. Froome, on the other hand, won 2 of them, hence why Contador's not the greatest GT rider since 2010/11.

About the sudden rise of Froome, well, we can also talk about the drop of form of Contador since 2012. Not in this part of the forum, but it's quite clear it has happened. Contador was an absolute beast since his ban, but after it he no longer was the guy from who people could say "it's a little bit too scary when Contador attacks".


My point here is obvious: though Contador is still one of the best, he can no longer crush the opposition as he could before 2012. Back in the day, only Schleck could accompany him. Now he can barely accompany Froome and Quintana.
 
Re: Re:

Miburo said:
El Pistolero said:
The excuse now is different peaks?

How else can you explain how a mediocre rider turns into the world's best climber and tt specialist in the season his contract expires?

I can give you plenty reasons, just not in this part of the forum

But for him to have suddenly improved using certain methods, he probably wasn't using those methods before. Ie he didn't use those methods until he was 26. A lot of other successful riders start using those methods from their early days and hence they don't have massive transformations like Froome.

PS mods, 'those methods' simply refers to a healthy diet and training hard :D
 
I have said in cycling never things are whats looks, sometimes when you think something bad of someone it is just the contrary and the opossite, but of course the way Froome ride it is like if he has a motor inside the bike and just at one moment when he is dropped then he press button and after that it doesnt matter other paces or other wheels, even of team mates, the motor is on and he cant stop...

It is his own engine that worked that way, but it is quite amazing. IMO is spectacular.
 
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Re: Re:

lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
The excuse now is different peaks?

How else can you explain how a mediocre rider turns into the world's best climber and tt specialist in the season his contract expires?

I can ask you something a little different: how can you explain why a rider, who no one knew prior to 2011, beat Contador 2 times in the greatest GT of all? Maybe Froome is having a 4 year-long peak, while Contador is having a 5 year-long off-peak? Perhaps Contador doesn't have it anymore, especially since his ban?

Contador has won 3 GTs since his ban. The active rider with the second most GT wins in his entire career "only" has 4 GT wins in total. In 2013 Contador simply wasn't in shape all year (plenty of other riders besides Froome beat him) and in 2015 he was tired from the Giro.

True, Contador is the rider who won the largest amount of GTs since 2012. However, he won 0 Tours since 2009.
You can justify everything you want, but the Tour is the greatest GT of all and Contador simply hasn't delivered good performances there, at least, good enough to win it. Whether that's due to lack of form, lack of capacity, or lack of something else is irrelevant to the point. Froome, on the other hand, won 2 of them, hence why Contador's not the greatest GT rider since 2010/11.

About the sudden rise of Froome, well, we can also talk about the drop of form of Contador since 2012. Not in this part of the forum, but it's quite clear it has happened. Contador was an absolute beast since his ban, but after it he no longer was the guy from who people could say "it's a little bit too scary when Contador attacks".


My point here is obvious: though Contador is still one of the best, he can no longer crush the opposition as he could before 2012. Back in the day, only Schleck could accompany him. Now he can barely accompany Froome and Quintana.

So what's Froome's excuse of being an absolute nobody from 2007 till 2011? Contador has shown brilliant performances ever since he became a pro back in 2003. Either different peaks in their career (early burner vs. late burner) or something we can't discuss here.
 
Re:

Taxus4a said:
I have said in cycling never things are whats looks, sometimes when you think something bad of someone it is just the contrary and the opossite, but of course the way Froome ride it is like if he has a motor inside the bike and just at one moment when he is dropped then he press button and after that it doesnt matter other paces or other wheels, even of team mates, the motor is on and he cant stop...

It is his own engine that worked that way, but it is quite amazing. IMO is spectacular.

I believe there was a poster who already said this (better explained than I possibly can), and I also remember reading something about this in Michelle Ferrari's blog, but when you make all these attacks, you spend your glycogen. So, if you can't distance other guys, you're screwed, because you'll have less and less of it, so your attacks you be worse. The same applies if you answer those attacks.

But if you, instead of attacking like that, gradually increase your pace, you're spending less glycogen and more fat. You're working more efficiently, much like Basso, for example, or Nibali.
Then, when you feel an attack can give you the victory, you go full genius mode, much like Froome did today.
I believe this is the Sky way, the knowledge behind their success.

I don't remember the particular article I read about this, but this is the link to Ferrari's blog:
http://www.53x12.com/


Pistolero:

To be honest, I believe Froome had a good capacity, but was severely badly managed. Not only that, but I believe he didn't really make a real effort prior to 2011, that's why he was on the verge of getting sacked from Sky.
 
Re: Re:

lenric said:
El Pistolero said:
The excuse now is different peaks?

How else can you explain how a mediocre rider turns into the world's best climber and tt specialist in the season his contract expires?

I can ask you something a little different: how can you explain why a rider, who no one knew prior to 2011, beat Contador 2 times in the greatest GT of all? Maybe Froome is having a 4 year-long peak, while Contador is having a 5 year-long off-peak? Perhaps Contador doesn't have it anymore, especially since his ban?

Froome didn't have the cycling education that Contador had which would have set him back since he was born in Kenya.
Bilharzia affected Froome for a long time, he only began treatment in 2010 after the vuelta when he was disgnosed with it. This is about the most believable reason u'll ever hear for a rider making a breakthrough. Bilharzia has many bad effects but some are increased illness and reduced oxygen in the bloodstream. Both are fairly important to cyclists.
 
Re: Re:

Forever The Best said:
Valv.Piti said:
El Pistolero said:
Kokoso said:
King Of Molehill said:
Since we're comparing apples to oranges I believe that 'legends' (on a global scale) tend to have personalities that are as big, if not bigger, than their palmarès. It gives them that lasting power because more people tend to write about them for as long as they are alive and after they die, whether in or out of the sport they competed in. It has as much to do with what they do off the bike as they do on it. The only riders in the current peloton that I would argue have that combination are:

Peter Sagan
What kind of big personality Sagan has? How do one even recognize big personality and what that means?

He's handsome, playful, funny, charismatic and not afraid to attack far from the finish-line. All qualities Chris Froome severely lacks.

Damn, you are a douche.
Lol.Just because he disagrees with you doesn't mean he is a douche.I find Froome as a whining rider.Remember when he whined about Contador in Manse 2013?Or him saying 'How's the coffee?' to Contador in his biography ?
Where did the nonsense about Froome not attacking from a distance start? Laughable
 

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