Convicted Doper/Dopers - Medal at Olympics?

May 24, 2010
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Ok so this is just my opinion but,

My question is: if you are ever convicted of doping in a sport shoudl you therefore not be banned from olympic competition for life?

I am a preson that believes in lifetime bans and huge financial penalties for dopers. Today Vino one gold but he is a convicted doper and as such proves he is a cheat and as such not a fair play competitor.

For that reason I do not believe he deserved to have one gold today. I know there were others in teh race with a tainted past and they two should have been prevented from competition.

What do others think?
 
Oct 30, 2011
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There are plenty of threads already about lifetime bans and whether or not they are appropriate. Unless you are suggesting that Vinokourov should be stripped of the medal despite serving his time, this thread is redundant and should be closed.
 
May 24, 2010
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You have missed my point, This is more about what the "Olympic Spirit" is about and if covicted dopers no matter the sport really represent the Olympic spirt as such?
 
Johnny Rotten said:
You have missed my point, This is more about what the "Olympic Spirit" is about and if covicted dopers no matter the sport really represent the Olympic spirt as such?
Yes all that Olympic spirit was wrapped up in the medals McQuaid was giving out.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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Johnny Rotten said:
You have missed my point, This is more about what the "Olympic Spirit" is about and if covicted dopers no matter the sport really represent the Olympic spirt as such?
Define the "Olympic Spirit" and then I'll answer you.

Right now it's just hand-waving and, as BroDeal says, trying to make someone who has (unlike most of his peers) already paid for his crimes pay even more for them.
 
Jul 27, 2010
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Johnny Rotten said:
Ok so this is just my opinion but,

My question is: if you are ever convicted of doping in a sport shoudl you therefore not be banned from olympic competition for life?

I am a preson that believes in lifetime bans and huge financial penalties for dopers. Today Vino one gold but he is a convicted doper and as such proves he is a cheat and as such not a fair play competitor.

For that reason I do not believe he deserved to have one gold today. I know there were others in teh race with a tainted past and they two should have been prevented from competition.

What do others think?
How does the fact that Vino tested positive 5 years ago prove that he cheated to win today? And not fair? Lifetime bans are what's fair.
 
Johnny Rotten said:
You have missed my point, This is more about what the "Olympic Spirit" is about and if covicted dopers no matter the sport really represent the Olympic spirt as such?
Olympic spirit? LOL. The Olympics are totally corrupt. It is much worse than ordinary corruption because of the cynical use of nationalism.
 
Jun 12, 2010
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For anyone that doesn't know Pat Mc Quaid , at the time a degree holder in politics took a very young and naive Sean Kelly to race in South Africa in contravention of the world wide IOC ban because of apartheid. This cost Kelly his chance to compete in the Olympics and earned Pat and Sean lifetime bans from the Olympics.

That`s Pats observation of the "Olympic Ideal " ..a big fat 0. :rolleyes:
 

the big ring

BANNED
Jul 28, 2009
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Olympic spirit is amateur competitors competing for the love of their sport. No money. Just recognition and a medal.

It went out the window 100s of years ago.

+1 to Vino has done his time.

To my mind there's no difference between a convicted doper helping someone win, or winning themselves.
 
Jul 16, 2011
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The Olympic Spirit is the product of whichever distillery paid the IOC enough for the "privilege" of calling their booze that.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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fluffkitten said:
The Olympic Spirit is the product of whichever distillery paid the IOC enough for the "privilege" of calling their booze that.
Hahaha, great post.
 
Lots of people who've failed drugs tests have won Olympic medals in their time. Many after the positive tests. Today's was just another one.

Maybe you could argue that bans should be lengthened, but lifetime bans for first offences are a bit extreme unless there are aggravating circumstances, and Vino is proof why they could be a bad thing for the sport.

The other thing is, if the positives carried lifetime bans from the Olympics, you'd get lots and lots of shenanigans between different countries trying to keep their medal hopes out of trouble and put other people's medal hopes in it, lots of cover-ups and extremely long and protracted CAS cases with people participating under a cloud.

I think that I'd rather see people get banned, serve time and then compete again than a Games full of Valverde-esque competitors subject to change at a later date.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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Yeah - if you think the Valverde and Contador cases were protracted fiascos, then a life ban would have made them so much worse.
 
May 26, 2010
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the Brits aren't bitter

Fotheringham in the Guardian

The gold medal for Alexandr Vinokourov will provide the perfect retirement gift for a cyclist who has taken the sport to the heights in his native Kazakhstan while plunging it into the grimmest depths elsewhere. Vinokourov brings with him enough baggage to keep Pickfords busy for a month, and he remains unrepentant about the blood doping that cost him two years of his career. Superb bike rider as he is in terms of tactical nous and aggression, he was not a winner who can shed any light on the sport's past, or give it optimism for its future unless your eyes light up at the prospect of a further influx of oil cash from the Wild East.
Another idiot journalist who has blinkers on when it comes to the sport. Amazing how he cant see this,

"We controlled it with four guys for 250km"
,from Cav as a questionable performance after having raced the TdF!
 
Ironically, British Cycling opened the door for Vino when they decided they wanted their own convicted cheat in the Olympic team. So, sorry Brits, no sympathy from me.

Personally I'm all for life bans, not only from the Olympics but from the sport, with the possibility to reduce the suspension if the athlete cooperates.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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hrotha said:
Ironically, British Cycling opened the door for Vino when they decided they wanted their own convicted cheat in the Olympic team. So, sorry Brits, no sympathy from me.

Personally I'm all for life bans, not only from the Olympics but from the sport, with the possibility to reduce the suspension if the athlete cooperates.
If the UCI and WADA weren't quite as obviously corrupt and incompetent, I might agree with you. As it is, I feel that so many of them dope and not get caught that life bans would really just give out the message "Whatever you do, make sure you don't get caught", rather than actually be an effective anti-doping measure.
 
May 26, 2009
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I wonder if they are going to savage Christine Ohuruogu if she takes the gold again ;)

Chambers, Millar, Myerscough. Don't forget torchbearer Tim Don.

Surely the Brits don't send these athletes to compete. Surely they don't? :rolleyes:
 
Jul 8, 2012
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No one who has been convicted of doping should get less than a lifetime ban, Brits included.

Cheats should never be allowed to prosper.
 
Given the fine company that Vino had in the road race, and that fat Pat was officially lifetime banned himself from Olympic competition, this is a lesser of evils victory.

I am not going to get upset with Vino unless he undergoes gender change and goes for the women's medal next time. Then again, it would make the women's race a lot more interesting.

If it cannot be clean, we might as well have the sport go full genius. It is already pretty close.

Dave.
 
D-Queued said:
Given the fine company that Vino had in the road race, and that fat Pat was officially lifetime banned himself from Olympic competition, this is a lesser of evils victory.

I am not going to get upset with Vino unless he undergoes gender change and goes for the women's medal next time. Then again, it would make the women's race a lot more interesting.

If it cannot be clean, we might as well have the sport go full genius. It is already pretty close.

Dave.
The women's races at Beijing, Varese and Mendrisio were great, the women's race at Geelong was pretty good, but the women's race at Copenhagen was a pathetic embarrassment.

The men's races at Beijing, Varese and Mendrisio were great, the men's race at Geelong was pretty good, but the men's race at Copenhagen was a pathetic embarrassment.

Gee, it looks like the women's events seem to match up to the parcours they're given! Hopefully they can match the men's event, which was surprisingly entertaining. But with only two laps of Box Hill this might be a flatter affair (literally). Apparently there was some campaigning that they start closer to the hill so they could do more laps, but the decision was that they had to start and end in the centre, so that means fewer ascents.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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Libertine Seguros said:
Apparently there was some campaigning that they start closer to the hill so they could do more laps, but the decision was that they had to start and end in the centre, so that means fewer ascents.
I said exactly that today when talking about the women's race. I get that they want to do the whole touristy thing with the race, but no other sport gets this BS trying to capture famous landmarks combined with their events. Don't see table tennis in London Eye pods or anything.
 

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