Critérium du Dauphiné 2014: Stage 4, Montélimar - Gap 167.5 km

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Aug 3, 2009
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Nice break, they can make it all the way through, no GC contenders to be afraid of. Bobby ftw !

PS how about starting a topic on best descender ?
 
Jan 3, 2011
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sir fly said:
I agree with the opinion that, so called, superb descender(s) are just taking more risks. They're more often on the ground, as well.
not quite. super descenders have the technical ability to handle situations safely that other wouldnt. But ofcourse they can crash too, espeicially when they push it even further.

Savoldelli was a super descender fopr example. He could truly make a huge difference downhill.
 
May 5, 2011
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del1962 said:
Spilak from Romandie evidence is as good as Nibs at descending
There is an obvious differnce between attacking downhill and going as fast as possible after beoing completely toasted up a mountain like Nibali on that day. :rolleyes:

Jesus guys
 
Cimber said:
not quite. super descenders have the technical ability to handle situations safely that other wouldnt. But ofcourse they can crash too, espeicially when they push it even further.

Savoldelli was a super descender fopr example. He could truly make a huge difference downhill.
Yes he was. He also spent a season in the hospital.
Superb descender is one who's primarily willing to take the risk. That's the quality that divides riders on the descents. I'm sure there are lots off riders who read the curves and hairpins equally well, but they just don't want to gamble.
The explanation of a good descending lies in the character.
 
Jan 3, 2011
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sir fly said:
Yes he was. He also spent a season in the hospital.
Superb descender is one who's primarily willing to take the risk. That's the quality that divides riders on the descents. I'm sure there are lots off riders who read the curves and hairpins equally well, but they just don't want to gamble.
The explanation of a good descending lies in the character.
Lots of riders crash badly, descending or not, being good or bad.

My point is that being good or bad at descending regularly doesnt come down to just taking risks. Good descenders often have much better bike handling.

They do stuff other riders would deem risky, but it isnt especially risky for them since they are better bike handlers. That, however, doesnt mean that they never crash. All riders crash now and then.

The difference between good and bad descenders doesnt come down to just taking risks.
 
Cimber said:
Lots of riders crash badly, descending or not, being good or bad.

My point is that being good or bad at descending regularly doesnt come down to just taking risks. Good descenders often have much better bike handling.

They do stuff other riders would deem risky, but it isnt especially risky for them since they are better bike handlers. That, however, doesnt mean that they never crash. All riders crash now and then.
When you're speaking about crashes you have to take into the consideration how they've happened. Was it in an effort to make a difference on the descent or in some other way.
Nibali's serial falls during the Tirreno stage last year were exclusively due to the effort. Savoldelli's fall too. (I'm naming the typical cases)
If you're using that argument you need to count the falls, classify them into causal categories, compare to the rest of falls, see if there's a difference and then try to pull a conclusion.
This way you're just randomly listing arguments trying to strengthen your position.
Superb descending is a reflection of the trait of personality.
 
Jun 5, 2014
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sir fly said:
When you're speaking about crashes you have to take into the consideration how they've happened. Was it in an effort to make a difference on the descent or in some other way.
Nibali's serial falls during the Tirreno stage last year were exclusively due to the effort. Savoldelli's fall too. (I'm naming the typical cases)
If you're using that argument you need to count the falls, classify them into causal categories, compare to the rest of falls, see if there's a difference and then try to pull a conclusion.
This way you're just randomly listing arguments trying to strengthen your position.
Superb descending is a reflection of the trait of personality.
You mean Giro right? In Tirreno he attacked on the descent (St. Elpidio stage) and made the difference together with Sagan and Rodriguez, taking the jersey from Froome.
 
Jan 3, 2011
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sir fly said:
When you're speaking about crashes you have to take into the consideration how they've happened. Was it in an effort to make a difference on the descent or in some other way.
Nibali's serial falls during the Tirreno stage last year were exclusively due to the effort. Savoldelli's fall too. (I'm naming the typical cases)
If you're using that argument you need to count the falls, classify them into causal categories, compare to the rest of falls, see if there's a difference and then try to pull a conclusion.
This way you're just randomly listing arguments trying to strengthen your position.
Superb descending is a reflection of the trait of personality.
Bad descenders crash just as often (and some more often) than good descenders.

However, some good descenders might try to push their luck beyond their ability, just as some bad descenders sometimes do.

Ofcourse you need to have the courage to ride fast downhill, but you also need to be a good bike handler. So its both personality and talent (just as it is with good sprinters - they also need to be fearless).

What you aer describing seems to be a reckless descender. Thats not the same as a good descender. But you can have a good descender who is also reckless, but that doesnt mean all good descenders are reckless.
 
Apr 19, 2010
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PirazziAttacksVino said:
Why would Contador try to go crazy on a descent when he said that he's not there with a big desire to win. He's there to see how his and his opposition's preparation is going.
Yeah. Not winning is the new winning.
 

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