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Doping In Athletics

Page 112 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2...-marathon-world-record-of-just-over-two-hours
(Quote)Not so long ago, the idea of anyone running an official marathon in two hours was the stuff of science fiction. But on the streets of Chicago it became a dizzying reality as the Kenyan Kelvin Kiptum ran 2 hours and 35 secs to shatter the men’s world record.

As the 23-year-old ran the final few hundred metres along Columbus Drive, he even had time to blow kisses and wave to the crowd. His time not only took 34 seconds off Eliud Kipchoge’s old best but was another staggering reminder of how much supershoe technology has changed the sport.
...
Until just over 10 months ago, the 23-year-old Kiptum had never run a marathon.(end quote)

Nothing to see here ... move along now.
 
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In the old paradigm gaining experience from marathon running was regarded essential. Now we know that it only makes one slow.

The key is to avoid completing a marathon in 2:02 or slower at all costs. As opposed to his predecessors, Kiptum has wisely steered away from that.
 
as a runner and owner of similar kind of supershoes I can tell you guys its not hype; I run about 15sec/km faster then in regular ones ala Asics cumulus; Kiptum run in prototype Alphafly 3 that are faster than everything on the market so far. Runners are no faster than before, its the tech.
 
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as a runner and owner of similar kind of supershoes I can tell you guys its not hype; I run about 15sec/km faster then in regular ones ala Asics cumulus; Kiptum run in prototype Alphafly 3 that are faster than everything on the market so far. Runners are no faster than before, its the tech.
Super shoes certainly are making a big difference, but the consensus I’ve seen has always hovered around 2-3% max benefit which would be 3-5 sec/km for elites or a few minutes. I don’t buy 15 sec/km unless you’re running 10 minute kms, but the benefits drop as pace goes down so that seems exaggerated.

World records would also need to improve by 8-10 minutes from pre super shoes levels and I think they’ve only improved a few min so far.
 
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as a runner and owner of similar kind of supershoes I can tell you guys its not hype; I run about 15sec/km faster then in regular ones ala Asics cumulus; Kiptum run in prototype Alphafly 3 that are faster than everything on the market so far. Runners are no faster than before, its the tech.
I don’t think we are (speaking generally) disputing that the new shoes make a difference in performance. But as we are in the clinic, most folks would dispute that the shoes are the only thing making a difference in smashing record times.
 
Bleeding ulcers? New one!
https://www.reuters.com/sports/athl...has-provisional-suspension-lifted-2023-11-03/
Former steeplechase world champion Norah Jeruto has had her provisional suspension for an anti-doping rule violation (ADRV) lifted with immediate effect after the charge was not proven, the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) said on Friday.

But she could not defend her title this year after she had been suspended "for the use of a Prohibited Substance/Method (ABP)". ABP refers to the Athlete Biological Passport, which shows discrepancies that can reveal the effects of doping.
The AIU said blood samples collected on three separate occasions in 2020 and 2021 had several abnormalities which World Athletics claimed was "clear evidence" of ADRVs.

Jeruto said she had been suffering from bleeding ulcers that led to hospitalisation due to internal bleeding, which was a plausible explanation for her samples showing she had lost blood. She had also tested positive for COVID-19.

But with no banned substances detected, the AIU were unable to prove the re-administration of blood products that improve endurance as part of a transfusion, which meant the provisional suspension was lifted.
The decision can still be appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.
 
Bleeding ulcers? New one!
https://www.reuters.com/sports/athl...has-provisional-suspension-lifted-2023-11-03/
Former steeplechase world champion Norah Jeruto has had her provisional suspension for an anti-doping rule violation (ADRV) lifted with immediate effect after the charge was not proven, the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) said on Friday.

But she could not defend her title this year after she had been suspended "for the use of a Prohibited Substance/Method (ABP)". ABP refers to the Athlete Biological Passport, which shows discrepancies that can reveal the effects of doping.
The AIU said blood samples collected on three separate occasions in 2020 and 2021 had several abnormalities which World Athletics claimed was "clear evidence" of ADRVs.

Jeruto said she had been suffering from bleeding ulcers that led to hospitalisation due to internal bleeding, which was a plausible explanation for her samples showing she had lost blood. She had also tested positive for COVID-19.

But with no banned substances detected, the AIU were unable to prove the re-administration of blood products that improve endurance as part of a transfusion, which meant the provisional suspension was lifted.
The decision can still be appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.
Whatever happened to the possibility (or maybe it was just conjecture) that testers could identify plasticizers (from the blood bags) in the blood samples to indicate blood boosting? Of course, if they could we would hear about a lot more cases of bleeding ulcers to provide excuses.
 
Eric Lira, an American therapist who is facing 10 years in jail under the new Rodchenkov Anti-Doping Act, which has made such activity a criminal offence.

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2...n-received-banned-drugs-in-us-claim-documents
The indictment, which was unsealed on Thursday and filed in the southern district of New York, says that Lira provided at least three Olympic athletes – representing Nigeria, Switzerland and the United Kingdom – with banned substances, including erythropoietin, human growth hormone and clenbuterol.

The documents also state that two other US coaches, O’Neil Wright and Dewayne Barrett, helped Lira. According to the story, which was broken by the Washington Post on Thursday, the Swiss athlete met Lira at John F. Kennedy international airport to buy human growth hormone. Lira then billed Barrett $4,590, according to the indictment.
 
any guesses, anyone?
The document uses male pronouns when referring to the British athlete, so we are talking one of the men, and the Nigerian is Blessing Okagbare, which suggests we are likely talking one of the sprint disciplines or the high hurdles, but beyond that not sure. There's already CJ Ujah from the British Tokyo sprint delegation who has a doping violation of course.
 
At the Valencia 10K, Agnes Chebet Ngetich (Kenya) just clocked a 28:46 in route to a win and new road 10K world record. That's 15 seconds faster than the 10,000 meters world record on the track. She was clocked at 14:12 at the 5K split, which is a second faster than the current road 5K women's world record. She's 22, another rising star in distance running.
A continuation of the progression in performance you get when you combine genetically perfect runners with modern doping methods.
 
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Data doping? I suppose it had to happen one day ...
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-boss-accused-fake-london-marathon-times.html e-mail
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A senior editor at a prestigious running magazine has been accused of posting misleading timings for the London Marathon.
Kate Carter - who has held a world record for being the fastest woman to run a marathon in a full-body costume - is alleged to have posted fake times at last year's event.
It comes as Carter, 47, appears to have disabled both her Instagram and 'X', formerly known as Twitter, accounts.

It's claimed there was no evidence to show that Carter ran the entire race and may have used software to 'manually' create GPS data based on a course map that was four years out of date.
The amateur athlete who is Commissioning Editor at Runner's World magazine has also come under suspicion for alleged 'course cutting' at the London Landmarks Half Marathon last April.
It's alleged that Carter posted an impressive official time but there is no record of her taking part in nearly half the 13.1 mile race.

Edit - is she married to Sean Ingle at the Guardian?
 
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Data doping? I suppose it had to happen one day ...
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...-boss-accused-fake-london-marathon-times.html e-mail
28
A senior editor at a prestigious running magazine has been accused of posting misleading timings for the London Marathon.
Kate Carter - who has held a world record for being the fastest woman to run a marathon in a full-body costume - is alleged to have posted fake times at last year's event.
It comes as Carter, 47, appears to have disabled both her Instagram and 'X', formerly known as Twitter, accounts.

It's claimed there was no evidence to show that Carter ran the entire race and may have used software to 'manually' create GPS data based on a course map that was four years out of date.
The amateur athlete who is Commissioning Editor at Runner's World magazine has also come under suspicion for alleged 'course cutting' at the London Landmarks Half Marathon last April.
It's alleged that Carter posted an impressive official time but there is no record of her taking part in nearly half the 13.1 mile race.

Edit - is she married to Sean Ingle at the Guardian?
That is cheating, not doping. Here is the definition of doping I found in Google:

Doping is the act of consuming artificial and often illegal substances to gain an advantage over others in sporting competitions (anabolic steroids, human growth hormones, stimulants and diuretics for example).
 

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