Doping in XC skiing

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Re: Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
BullsFan22 said:
repre said:
They have RUSADA database from 2012-15 years and made this decision according to that information. Maybe Shipulin and Ustiugov were tested positive in some domestic competitions...Based on the previous investigations i dont think there are even a handful clean russian athletes, so i wouldn't rule out positive tests for Shipulin and Ustiugov. We'll have more information on there soon.
Russians can keep talking to themselves how the world is against them. This is definitely easier than man up and do something about mass doping in their country.
So far only Anton Babikov, Tatyana Akimova and Uliana Kaisheva are allowed to compete in Korea.

No xc list has been named as yet. I'd love to see the final list. I am willing to bet that list will be made up of skiers that have not even raced on the WC this year....

According to WADA and the IOC, any Russian that was within 1000km of Sochi in February 2014 was doped, including spectators and volunteers. So I hope that the IOC do the right thing and exclude any Russian from even entering S. Korea.
The problem is that the source that lists those three along with the 'forbidden' list simply lists everybody who has been on the World Cup this season, since only Babikov, Akimova and Kaisheva have been 'approved', but simultaneously the SBR had claimed they had submitted 11 athletes for the Olympics, and only 3 have been rejected - Shipulin, Garanichev and Volkov. Interestingly, Kaisheva is mentioned in the McLaren report, as one of 12 juniors who went to a pre-Junior Worlds camp at Sochi in January 2014 - all of whom appear in the report only for one test on that date, for which 11 came back clean and one sample (Evsyunina's) did not have a result recorded. Yurlova and Virolaynen do not appear in the report at all, so although the report does not contain anything that suggests Kaisheva is guilty of anything other than having the wrong nationality as far as the IOC is concerned, for them to have been rejected and Kaisheva to have been approved shows that this is not the main source from which decisions are being made.

Now, if the SBR only nominated 11 athletes, of whom 3 have been approved, then they're going to have to dig deep into their reserve and hope that the IOC will approve some of the others that the Russians think have already been forbidden (and indeed may have been, but could appeal, though they'd need an Armitstead-esque turnaround to have a chance). For what it's worth, Yurlova's coach confirms they haven't been notified either way yet and they are still confident of making the Games, since Yurlova was thrown off the Russian team during 2013-14 and wasn't involved in Sochi at all. This suggests that they're still processing all the cases and the three approved so far are the most cut-and-dried cases. If we make an educated guess based on the squads from the last couple of World Cups, they're also the first ones alphabetically.

You'll have to excuse my ignorance, but I don't know the exact, to the point details of the three athletes. I just know so far they are the only biathletes that are 'allowed' to take part.

In the bigger picture, I haven't read a single word of the McLaren report, and I am quite certain I won't read it anytime soon. I am sure I've mentioned this once or twice in the forum.

Why don't they just simply come out and completely erase all Russian results from Sochi? Why the gymnastics around it?

Bjoerndalen is right, if it's so easy to manipulate tests, then everybody should be afraid after their samples are taken away.

I am willing to bet that people like Ustiugov had nothing do with Rodchenkov, but they are targeted simply because of their potential at the Olympics. I am also certain had he not fallen in the sprint in Sochi and gotten (very likely IMO) a medal out of that race, he would have been in the same boat as Legkov, Vylegzhanin.

So if he wasn't implicated in anything, and post 2015 testing is OK, what's the problem? To me it seems like they are just trying to snatch a whisker that flies through the air and say 'aha, here it is,' without presenting any concrete evidence.

I know what the problem is, Rodchenkov left his post in 2015, then emigrated to the US, where he still lives. So it all starts and ends with him.

And what are Cramer and Pichler supposed to think about this? They have actually continuously denied any doping by their athletes prior, during and after Sochi. Pichler was there 2011-2014 (2015, maybe??, Libertine, you would know this) and he says there's no way any of his athletes were doping and that he would have known and would have said something right away, and knowing how critical he was of the Russians prior to taking over as the women's head coach, especially at the 2008 and 2009 world's where Yaroshenko, Iourieva, Akhatova were caught. He isn't allowed to go to Korea simply because he was a coach? And I am certain now that Cramer won't be allowed to go either. Guilt by association, the very definition of it is being spelled out in this never-ending saga.
 
Also, Lapshin, as you said, is allowed to go, and he apparently was on the McLaren report. Viktor Ahn, who as we all know, emigrated to Russia and received his citizenship before Sochi and won medals in Sochi, isn't allowed to compete, yet he was not in any list or was suspected of anything....So what gives? One man is on a list, but he moved to Korea and is a Korean now, but the other who was a Korean, raced for Korea, then moved to Russia, became Russian, won medals with Russia, isn't allowed to go??

I wouldn't be shocked if Bolshunov (strong contender for medals in multiple xc events), Chervotkin (outsider), Larkov (outsider) Belorukova (outsider), Sedova (outsider), Nepryaeva (outsider), etc don't get to go either for reasons that nobody will know.

And I am reading some American news outlets and some of the comments below them and it's the usual, nauseating hypocrisy mixed with hyperbole. It's pathetic really.
 
The first 'full' list of the Russians who have been deemed satisfactorily clean to appear at Pyeongchang in the Nordic disciplines has leaked, and the names are:

BIATHLON
Tatiana Akimova, Anton Babikov, Matvey Eliseev, Uliana Kaisheva

CROSS COUNTRY
Yulia Belorukova, Aleksandr Bolshunov, Alexey Chervotkin, Andrey Larkov, Andrey Melnichenko, Anna Nechayevskaya, Natalia Nepryaeva, Aleksandr Panzhinskiy, Anastasia Sedova, Denis Spitsov

NORDIC COMBINED & SKI JUMPING
Irina Avvakumova, Anastasiya Barannikova, Evgeniy Klimov, Denis Kornilov, Aleksandra Kustova, Mikhail Nazarov, Alexey Romanov, Sofya Tikhonova

The official lists come out on the 28th, Russian media seems to suggest that there are still some revisions due.

However, we also know that Välbe nominated no fewer than 40 athletes for XC in the knowledge many would be excluded, while Kravtsov seemingly did not think they would face any serious issues and only nominated 11 biathletes, so now there's the potential that this blows up in their face as at least the Russian XC team can put together a half decent challenge and some relay teams, even if they're missing their talisman.
 
Re: Re:

Aragon said:
As far as I know, this is brand new information about a new research paper on the astma medicins that showed clear benefits:

https://www.idrottsforskning.se/astmamedicin-gor-idrottare-starkare-och-mer-explosiva/
Nice find. Thanks for sharing. Unfortunately this goes over most people's heads, and given the current situation with the Russians, not many people will pay too much attention.

It beggars belief how there isn't more outrage. Clearly, studies show (we can see it plainly) asthma medicine has huge benefits. I mean, if it didn't the Norge Ski Forbund would not recommend it to any of their skiers. Clearly this has been used and abused for many years, and when it's now been put into daylight, those that use it should be punished. How are drug tests avoided? More TUE's? "Hey, yes I have symptoms of asthma, here is the doctors note...thank you!'

The more I read about these asthma benefits and how widespread it is, the more I get angry at the fact that Sundby got a two month summer ban, and he went 10 times over the legal limit. He should have been given a two year ban right on the spot.
 
So Katya Yurlova-Percht got her final decision today, and it was negative, so she is barred from the Olympics. The reason this is interesting is that she was something of an outsider in the time-frame covered - disappointing results and a lack of pace led to her being jettisoned from the squad and relegated to the national calendar. Cut off from national team support and living in the northwest of Russia, far from most of the country's major biathlon facilities, she trained mainly in Kontiolahti, and forced her way back into international selections, qualifying for the European Championships in Otepää, on the internal points system via the Izhevsk Rifle, taking bronze in the Individual and Pursuit to qualify for the World Championships where she took that surprise gold in the Individual after hitting all 20 targets and knowing how to measure her efforts on the trails she'd been using as her training base. Since then she's taken a season out to start a family, but aside from that she's been Russia's most dependable female star. She's not mentioned once in the McLaren docs and follows her own training plan, not prescribed by the team's central coaches, to this day. The response has been interesting, as she's had some fairly major athletes commenting in sympathy with, or support for, her, including some from countries not ordinarily especially sympathetic to the Russians' plight. Katya herself has left the heavy implication that she thinks the IOC may not be using doping connections alone as reasons for their exclusions, but using it as a pretext to exclude Russian athletes capable of winning medals, for PR purposes.

If the IOC does have evidence that explains her exclusion, I imagine that there must be something from 2012-13 kind of time, before she fell from favour, that is in the RUSADA database, that could explain it, as she was sidelined during the early part of the Olympic season, explicitly outside of the framework of the Sochi team and did not work with the central team for the rest of the timeframe from which the records are taken.
 
Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
So Katya Yurlova-Percht got her final decision today, and it was negative, so she is barred from the Olympics. The reason this is interesting is that she was something of an outsider in the time-frame covered - disappointing results and a lack of pace led to her being jettisoned from the squad and relegated to the national calendar. Cut off from national team support and living in the northwest of Russia, far from most of the country's major biathlon facilities, she trained mainly in Kontiolahti, and forced her way back into international selections, qualifying for the European Championships in Otepää, on the internal points system via the Izhevsk Rifle, taking bronze in the Individual and Pursuit to qualify for the World Championships where she took that surprise gold in the Individual after hitting all 20 targets and knowing how to measure her efforts on the trails she'd been using as her training base. Since then she's taken a season out to start a family, but aside from that she's been Russia's most dependable female star. She's not mentioned once in the McLaren docs and follows her own training plan, not prescribed by the team's central coaches, to this day. The response has been interesting, as she's had some fairly major athletes commenting in sympathy with, or support for, her, including some from countries not ordinarily especially sympathetic to the Russians' plight. Katya herself has left the heavy implication that she thinks the IOC may not be using doping connections alone as reasons for their exclusions, but using it as a pretext to exclude Russian athletes capable of winning medals, for PR purposes.

If the IOC does have evidence that explains her exclusion, I imagine that there must be something from 2012-13 kind of time, before she fell from favour, that is in the RUSADA database, that could explain it, as she was sidelined during the early part of the Olympic season, explicitly outside of the framework of the Sochi team and did not work with the central team for the rest of the timeframe from which the records are taken.

And Yurlova is one of those biathletes that is well liked all across the board at the IBU and was never implicated in anything. Her making the point that this is not about doping but about taking away those with good chances at medals.

The IOC has not said why these athletes are not allowed to compete. That's quite unprofessional and it stinks to high heaven. If there is a positive test or multiple positive tests, then they need to make those public. If there aren't any issues, they should make that public as well. Be open and transparent.

What's even more scary (if that's even possible) is that they are completely shutting all semblance of Russian symbols and even talked about barring Russian fans of entering arenas/trails with flags, etc. If that isn't discrimination, I don't know what is.
 
This is what she wrote

That's not a joke but a reason that I'm not in the Olympic team is it my potential Opportunity to take a medal in Peyonchang!
But with a career record of 3 podiums in 100+ starts she can be hardly described as having a good chance of a medal or even a better chance than some of the people who were actually invited to use that argument.
 
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Re: Re:

BullsFan22 said:
Aragon said:
As far as I know, this is brand new information about a new research paper on the astma medicins that showed clear benefits:

https://www.idrottsforskning.se/astmamedicin-gor-idrottare-starkare-och-mer-explosiva/
Nice find. Thanks for sharing. Unfortunately this goes over most people's heads, and given the current situation with the Russians, not many people will pay too much attention.

It beggars belief how there isn't more outrage. Clearly, studies show (we can see it plainly) asthma medicine has huge benefits. I mean, if it didn't the Norge Ski Forbund would not recommend it to any of their skiers. Clearly this has been used and abused for many years, and when it's now been put into daylight, those that use it should be punished. How are drug tests avoided? More TUE's? "Hey, yes I have symptoms of asthma, here is the doctors note...thank you!'

The more I read about these asthma benefits and how widespread it is, the more I get angry at the fact that Sundby got a two month summer ban, and he went 10 times over the legal limit. He should have been given a two year ban right on the spot.
Really tired of asthma medicines in sport now, the endless pushing of grey zones in sports medicine ethics, the excuses and the doping controls that can't keep up. Personally I would like to see a complete ban. Maybe a short term, closely monitored TUE for those with a cast 'iron diagnosis out of competition, but that's it.

What do those of you with asthma think about a complete ban?

I know there are nuances in this, but, from the article, 62% of Norwegian olympic medals since 1992 have been won by 'asthmatics'...
 
Bavarianrider said:
So, a busted cheat like Sundy is totally welcome at the Olympics, but Ustiugov isn't allowed to go without ANY EVIDENCE provided at all. I am sorry but this is just wrong on so many levels. :mad: :mad:
Not just that, but Timofey Lapshin, who has multiple tests recorded in the McLaren docs - including a positive test at a Russian Cup race - is allowed to go as he's changed nationality, but of the 7 athletes nominated for Pyeongchang by Kravtsov but not cleared for competition, four of them have not been mentioned in McLaren at all - Tsvetkov, Virolaynen, Uslugina and Yurlova-Percht.

At the same time, it's stupid and presumptuous of Kravtsov to have only nominated what he thought would be the A-team, Välbe submitted more or less everybody on the squad with the aim that, once they knew who could and couldn't go they could formulate a team around the best of those allowed to go, whereas now there will be next to no Russian presence in biathlon, the country's favourite wintersport (well, depending on time and era, obviously, due to ice hockey). Based on the athletes who've been cleared to compete and the athletes who've turned out for Russia this year, there's also Pashchenko, and Slivko who aren't mentioned in McLaren as well, and Shopin and Mironova who are only mentioned in the same way Kaisheva is, by dint of being in the junior team at the wrong time, and Kaisheva's cleared to compete so you'd anticipate they could potentially be as well. That would at least give them a relay's worth of athletes. Latypov's also been around but I suspect his meldonium positive would give them just cause to exclude him, while I'm not sure of Zagoruiko's status, I don't think she's in McLaren but having been around several years and in the same club team as Uslugina she may get the same treatment as her and Virolaynen.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Bavarianrider said:
So, a busted cheat like Sundy is totally welcome at the Olympics, but Ustiugov isn't allowed to go without ANY EVIDENCE provided at all. I am sorry but this is just wrong on so many levels. :mad: :mad:
Now I'm not sure, but wasn't his clear urine keeped in Moscow laboratory, same as with Shipulin?
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Libertine Seguros said:
Not just that, but Timofey Lapshin, who has multiple tests recorded in the McLaren docs - including a positive test at a Russian Cup race
Yep, this is really outrageous.
 
Kokoso said:
Bavarianrider said:
So, a busted cheat like Sundy is totally welcome at the Olympics, but Ustiugov isn't allowed to go without ANY EVIDENCE provided at all. I am sorry but this is just wrong on so many levels. :mad: :mad:
Now I'm not sure, but wasn't his clear urine keeped in Moscow laboratory, same as with Shipulin?
The point Libertine and Bavarian are making is that you can't simply ban athletes without proof. You also can't ban coaches simply because they are of one nationality. Pichler gets to go to Korea and he was the women's coach for the Russians in Sochi. Why?
 
Apr 22, 2012
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BullsFan22 said:
Kokoso said:
Bavarianrider said:
So, a busted cheat like Sundy is totally welcome at the Olympics, but Ustiugov isn't allowed to go without ANY EVIDENCE provided at all. I am sorry but this is just wrong on so many levels. :mad: :mad:
Now I'm not sure, but wasn't his clear urine keeped in Moscow laboratory, same as with Shipulin?
The point Libertine and Bavarian are making is that you can't simply ban athletes without proof.
As you can see clearly I've understood Bavarian's point; he was pretty clear on it. Don't quite get your point though, maybe you've misunderstood my reaction?
 
Kokoso said:
BullsFan22 said:
Kokoso said:
Bavarianrider said:
So, a busted cheat like Sundy is totally welcome at the Olympics, but Ustiugov isn't allowed to go without ANY EVIDENCE provided at all. I am sorry but this is just wrong on so many levels. :mad: :mad:
Now I'm not sure, but wasn't his clear urine keeped in Moscow laboratory, same as with Shipulin?
The point Libertine and Bavarian are making is that you can't simply ban athletes without proof.
As you can see clearly I've understood Bavarian's point; he was pretty clear on it. Don't quite get your point though, maybe you've misunderstood my reaction?
You were obviously being snarky with your comment, hence my response.
 
Sep 25, 2009
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diggins easily runs away from the entire norge asthma train that included the muscle mama herself :rolleyes:

wait, jess is an avid, multi-year asthma med user too...must be something new ....
 
The thing is, I totally understand the reasoning behind them barring Shipulin, Garanichev and Volkov (of the extended team there's also Malyshko who would likely be blocked for the same reason). Normally, because you're competing as part of an allocation for the national team, the onus is on the authorities to prove you're dirty to block you, and so none of those athletes are banned, they are all still competing on the World Cup and at the European Championships. However, here, they're competing on an invite basis from the IOC, so the onus is on the athletes to prove their cleanliness as a condition to receive that invitation; as athletes who are named in McLaren and for whom some samples did not have results logged or could not be traced, those athletes were in the unfortunate position that even if they haven't done anything wrong, if those tests or their results could not be found, they couldn't pass the IOC's condition. Whether that's fair is another question, but I can understand and appreciate that there's a clear rationale.

But there's two issues that need a resolution. Firstly, why are Shipulin, Garanichev and Volkov subject to these requirements and not Lapshin, just because in the last four years he's changed his nationality? He was still part of that Russian team, he is still named in McLaren, and he even has a failed test in there, which none of those three others have. And secondly, the IOC need to explain the reasoning for Tsvetkov, Yurlova-Percht, Virolaynen and Uslugina not being cleared? I mean, I get that three of them raced in 2013-14 and that might be all the reason they give (though it seems it oughtn't be, as Kaisheva and Eliseev did the Junior Worlds that year), though Tsvetkov was injured and missed most of the season, Yurlova was removed from the team early on in the season, and Virolaynen didn't even debut at the World Cup until after Sochi. But Uslugina (née Trusova) didn't even race internationally that season and isn't one of those like Baranunkin who had nothing to do with the national team but are in McLaren because they had positives on the national calendar.
 
Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
The thing is, I totally understand the reasoning behind them barring Shipulin, Garanichev and Volkov (of the extended team there's also Malyshko who would likely be blocked for the same reason). Normally, because you're competing as part of an allocation for the national team, the onus is on the authorities to prove you're dirty to block you, and so none of those athletes are banned, they are all still competing on the World Cup and at the European Championships. However, here, they're competing on an invite basis from the IOC, so the onus is on the athletes to prove their cleanliness as a condition to receive that invitation; as athletes who are named in McLaren and for whom some samples did not have results logged or could not be traced, those athletes were in the unfortunate position that even if they haven't done anything wrong, if those tests or their results could not be found, they couldn't pass the IOC's condition. Whether that's fair is another question, but I can understand and appreciate that there's a clear rationale.

But there's two issues that need a resolution. Firstly, why are Shipulin, Garanichev and Volkov subject to these requirements and not Lapshin, just because in the last four years he's changed his nationality? He was still part of that Russian team, he is still named in McLaren, and he even has a failed test in there, which none of those three others have. And secondly, the IOC need to explain the reasoning for Tsvetkov, Yurlova-Percht, Virolaynen and Uslugina not being cleared? I mean, I get that three of them raced in 2013-14 and that might be all the reason they give (though it seems it oughtn't be, as Kaisheva and Eliseev did the Junior Worlds that year), though Tsvetkov was injured and missed most of the season, Yurlova was removed from the team early on in the season, and Virolaynen didn't even debut at the World Cup until after Sochi. But Uslugina (née Trusova) didn't even race internationally that season and isn't one of those like Baranunkin who had nothing to do with the national team but are in McLaren because they had positives on the national calendar.
The goal is simple, to not let the top Russian prospects at these games compete. They have to come up with something. The fact that they are coming up with this with two weeks to go, so athletes like Ustiugov and Shipulin have little to no time to appeal and get reinstated is telling. Both athletes have written letters, as have Ahn and Retivykh and others, as to why they are not allowed. The IOC hasn't answered and they probably never will answer. FIS and the IBU wrote letters as well. Besseberg asked the same questions, that Shipulin and others banned have not had a positive test and they have been in the IBU's testing pool and no irregularities found. What's the deal?
 
Apr 3, 2016
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You guys realize this is punishment against Russia as a nation for staging the biggest doping scandal ever uncovered right? It’s not about banning any athlete that has ever tested positive, but banning Russian athletes, trainers and support staff that were part of a major conspiracy and fraud to cheat the olympics on home turf. If you think that any athlete that has ever tested positive should also be banned from the games, that’s a different discussion.
 
Re:

Oude Geuze said:
You guys realize this is punishment against Russia as a nation for staging the biggest doping scandal ever uncovered right? It’s not about banning any athlete that has ever tested positive, but banning Russian athletes, trainers and support staff that were part of a major conspiracy and fraud to cheat the olympics on home turf. If you think that any athlete that has ever tested positive should also be banned from the games, that’s a different discussion.

Show me the proof against all the athletes that are not allowed to compete in Korea and I'll believe you.
 
Re: Re:

BullsFan22 said:
Oude Geuze said:
You guys realize this is punishment against Russia as a nation for staging the biggest doping scandal ever uncovered right? It’s not about banning any athlete that has ever tested positive, but banning Russian athletes, trainers and support staff that were part of a major conspiracy and fraud to cheat the olympics on home turf. If you think that any athlete that has ever tested positive should also be banned from the games, that’s a different discussion.

Show me the proof against all the athletes that are not allowed to compete in Korea and I'll believe you.
What has "proof against all the athletes that are not allowed to compete in Korea" to do with your belief that there was "major conspiracy and fraud to cheat the olympics in Russia"? If you are not shown the former, you will not believe the latter?
 
Re:

Oude Geuze said:
You guys realize this is punishment against Russia as a nation for staging the biggest doping scandal ever uncovered right? It’s not about banning any athlete that has ever tested positive, but banning Russian athletes, trainers and support staff that were part of a major conspiracy and fraud to cheat the olympics on home turf. If you think that any athlete that has ever tested positive should also be banned from the games, that’s a different discussion.
The problem is providing a genuine punishment that is consistent and free from coming across as arbitrary.

As I said, there is a difference in this instance because the onus is not on the authority to prove the athletes to have been involved in the Sochi scandal, but on the athletes to prove they were not. As a result, I can fully understand why athletes who were in Sochi and whose names appear in the McLaren docs are not welcome, even if there was nothing recorded as specifically untoward - for example Shipulin and Garanichev, as some of their tests either have no results recorded or could not be traced. That does not mean necessarily that those athletes were in on the scam, but they cannot satisfactorily prove they were a) clean and b) innocent of involvement, so I get why they aren't invited. It would be a big damp squib if, after all the shouting and dancing, the only Russians who got barred were Loginov and Starykh, after all.

However, once you get past the Sochi squad, it becomes difficult to fathom a consistent criteria for who is allowed and who isn't, when you consider the four others who've been barred and the four who are accepted from Kravtsov's selection (I still think it was ridiculously presumptuous of him, and a PR disaster, to only nominate the planned A-team). It can't be based on who is in the documents we know from McLaren, because while that explains Eliseev, Babikov and Akimova being accepted, it doesn't explain Kaisheva being accepted (I've mentioned the twelve juniors from the reports before, which I think are simply people who had no connection to the Sochi squad and in terms of the report and the fallout from the Sochi scam were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time and, seeing as Kaisheva has been cleared for Pyeongchang, it would seem that the IOC concurs), nor does it explain Yurlova, Virolaynen, Uslugina or Tsvetkov being barred.

Anybody at all who competed in the Russian World Cup team in 2013-14 under any auspices would seem a more fruitful definition, since that would seem to explain many of the further bars - Tsvetkov did one World Cup race, the sprint at Östersund, before spending the rest of the season at the IBU - he had been injured in the Sochi test race at the end of 2012-13 so was below his level and fell from consideration. Yurlova likewise raced in Östersund before being relegated from the international track, falling all the way to the national calendar, from which point on she has been coached independently of the Russian team. Virolaynen was on the IBU Cup until after Sochi, but joined the World Cup team from Pokljuka onwards. And that would explain why the junior athletes Eliseev and Kaisheva are not barred. But then Uslugina is the big question mark, because she did not race at all internationally in the 2013-14 season. Unless she is separately under investigation for something else, independent of the Sochi scam, but then you would expect that to result in existing sanctions or provisional suspensions because the 'absence of the tests that could prove your cleanliness' defence wouldn't be applicable to her.

The separate issue with regards to Lapshin is not that he tested positive, although that is an element. It's that he was part of the Russian team in 2013-14, and he was in the McLaren documents, and these are seemingly the basis on which many Russians are being barred from the Games, including several who were not involved in the scam or at least far more peripheral to it than he was, but because he's switched his allegiance to South Korea he gets to compete, which is no justice at all.
 
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Its unfortunate that there will be some collateral damage when banning a nation. There are a couple of ways to do this:

Ban everyone involved in Sochi. Pros: seems fair. Cons: people involved in Russian winter sports at a junior level or “b-tier” as in not selected for the Sochi squad might nevertheless have been involved in the systematic doping but will now be allowed to participate.

Ban anyone Russian. Pros: Punishes Russia and all doping perpetrators, sends a tough message. Cons: Possibly very high collateral damage, will be seen as incredibly unfair by Russian athletes and people. Politically infeasible.

Ban anyone who tested positive. Pros: fair to the athletes. Cons: probably full of false negatives as we know that doping was a systematic, top down, state sponsored affair that included both FSB, high ranking politicians and staff and this you cannot trust a non positive tested athlete to have been clean. Also business as usual for Russia, no extra punishment for conspiracy and fraud.

Any other ideas?
 

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