Driving into cyclists the Emma way

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Opening doors is something I was taught in school. But that was another time in the US and the PacNoWest did have/has a stronger integrated cycling culture.

Your point is key though. There’s zero awareness on the part of many drivers. Similarly, so-called dedicated infrastructure is somewhat better than open road, but it just attracts pedestrians, wheelchairs, double parked laborers and police.

The coming solution on the part of NY’s useless and inept mayor is to license/register cyclists and require helmets. Not because this will save lives, but it will take the onus of the city in the case of non-compliant fatalities and open a space for prosecution in other instances.

Typical neoliberalism.
I should probably expand on the European door opening - it was either the Dutch or Danish that were teaching to open the door with the opposite hand. This naturally turned the person so as to more easily check what was coming from behind you.

And yes, NYC, just passing the buck... "Band-Aid"/"feel good" solutions that they can chest-beat about - 'don't blame us, we did something about it'...
 
Yeah, if you’d read through the thread rather than rushing to be obnoxious you’d have seen that I addressed door range and speed.

I don’t know what state of consciousness you inhabit, but I don’t put myself close to active cars at a speed that precludes reflex. What do you think? 30? 35? Sure, I’ve crashed at times where there’s no time to respond. But not due to urban cars.

You think that’s not controllable?
Sometimes it depends on the road and traffic as well but I agree that most experienced cyclists are wary of car doors especially when they see a car parking up ahead of them. Such incidents are so random ,it's a sense thing like watching people back out of driveways often without taking a proper look.
 
I should probably expand on the European door opening - it was either the Dutch or Danish that were teaching to open the door with the opposite hand. This naturally turned the person so as to more easily check what was coming from behind you.

And yes, NYC, just passing the buck... "Band-Aid"/"feel good" solutions that they can chest-beat about - 'don't blame us, we did something about it'...
That would be the Dutch. I - and I suspect other Danes as well - was simply taught to look. However, since my default seat when out with the whole family was the seat just behind the driver's seat (in fact it still is when there are more people in the car than the driver and myself), and I'm right-handed it came quite naturally to turn around.
Also... what about checking for other cars?
 
What Sydney drivers are capable of has nothing to do with whether one is riding too fast to manage a door. That was what you responded to.

Yes, I generally find it obnoxious when people are compelled to interject rather than take in a larger discussion.
 
My point was that on the basis of my experience, no it is not always controllable. Yes one can do things to reduce the risks you expose yourself to but it's not possible to control things you have no control over. I guess you can choose to not ride outside.
 
Oh, the drama. “ Not ride outside” No one said stay inside. I’ve been cycling in NY alone for 30 some years alonand I made some basic remarks that are wholly defensible based on that experience. You seem not to have focused on what was actually being discussed, but you want to fly off, argue, be authoritative and dramatic and get the last word, come back at it.

later man
 
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Hmmm, I answered your specific question, i.e. no, it's not always possible to control the situation to always avoid door risk (or other similar risks). Yes it's most certainly possible to reduce the risk but not to eliminate it.

I'm glad you've managed to stay safe for as long as you have.

Unfortunately the same can't be said for many. Indeed I won an 8 year long Supreme Court (NSW) case on this very issue. See that image on the left? That's my prosthetic cycling leg. I use one because my real leg was amputated following just such an incident.
 
I used to ride roads fearlessly, now I find myself riding more and more on the sidewalk, though it’s generally illegal. Even there, I encounter problems. One person jumped right in front of my bike, wagged a finger at me, and said, “You can’t ride on the sidewalk.” I heard another guy behind me yelling threateningly at me, so I left the sidewalk and went on the street. I thought that would settle it with him, but when I stopped further down the road, he came up and began to threaten me further. I’m not making this up, but he accused me of stalking him. Apparently he had seen me twice before in the same general area, and said he knew from “numbers” that I had to be stalking him. Unbelievable.
 
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I have ridden extensively in NYC,Long Island,Germany near Frankfurt,Berlin and Hamburg, most of my experience is in California. NYC ,San Diego and LA all have lots of drivers,traffic and car doors but have a decent bike path systems.
If you want a vote for my world wide anti cycling location it would be Central Florida. I had everything from beer bottles,dirty diapers,full Big Gulps,lit cigarettes and yelling and slurs. People trying to crash you while training everywhere. People pulling up next to you and start screaming about being a " my wise and beautiful friend" "gay"" queer" for riding a bike.
I have found that music from Chevelle, Clutch, Papa Roach and Ministry can negate many negative comments. Also kicking car doors and breaking off car mirrors is also soothing.

View: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm7vnOC4hoY
 
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