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Edvald Boasson Hagen - the future

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Jun 15, 2009
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flyor64 said:
1814...but it was only to be ceded to Sweden. The big date was 1905 I think, when Norway left Sweden and Sweden eventually recognized it later that same year. Followed shortly by Norway crowning it's first king...a prince from Denmark!

It's a very interesting history, especially to someone learning it later in life, and paints a picture of very close ties between the three countries (to a relative outsider it does anyway).

Maltiv, Hektoren, or any of the other Norwegians on the site can feel free to correct my discrepancies if they so desire :)

On the Nynorsk language, I've heard it's genesis was due to Bokmål being too similar to Danish. Interestingly enough, if one so chooses to write correspondence to the government in Nynorsk, the government is obliged to respond in Nynorsk....by law. I've heard it can take months to get a response...but you will get one and in the proper language! Not that I have a clue with Nynorsk. :eek:

As an import to Norway way back in the late 80's I'm hardly qualified. I'm born-and-bred British stock, with a personal preference for briar pipes, mulligatawny, real ale, roast beef, PG Wodehouse, Parkinson, the Goon Show, Battle-of-Britain museum, wog women and Spurs (not necessarily in that order). As my personal experience goes, any delay in governmental response in Norway will probably be down to a lack of efficiency rather than "bokmål/nynorsk" hand-wringing.
 
Aug 18, 2009
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hektoren said:
As an import to Norway way back in the late 80's I'm hardly qualified. I'm born-and-bred British stock, with a personal preference for briar pipes, mulligatawny, real ale, roast beef, PG Wodehouse, Parkinson, the Goon Show, Battle-of-Britain museum, wog women and Spurs (not necessarily in that order). As my personal experience goes, any delay in governmental response in Norway will probably be down to a lack of efficiency rather than "bokmål/nynorsk" hand-wringing.

You what now?
 
Love this quote from EBH:

"I'm really bad at remembering names or [cycling] history. I know who Eddy Merckx is, and that he was really good, but I don't know his results.

"I love cycling. But I don't like watching it. When it's on TV I might watch the final, but I won't sit for hours. And I don't watch other sports. I've never had any heroes. I have just always loved doing it."
 
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maltiv said:
Love this quote from EBH:

"I'm really bad at remembering names or [cycling] history. I know who Eddy Merckx is, and that he was really good, but I don't know his results.

"I love cycling. But I don't like watching it. When it's on TV I might watch the final, but I won't sit for hours. And I don't watch other sports. I've never had any heroes. I have just always loved doing it."

It does in some ways explain a lot. He has nobody to emulate, nobody to imitate, nobody to live up to except himself. makes him the rider he is.
 
After seeing him develop for a couple of years, I agree that the potential seems relatively limitless, although it seems slightly more likely that he'll be a better 1-day rider than a GT rider. But much in the same fashion as Kelly or Jalabert, who could be up there in the GT (don't really know much about EBH in the high mountains, actually, so take that with a grain of salt) but not quite at the top, but would be a good bet to win anything else. Especially 1-week stage races with moderate climbing and a time trial. Kelly won Paris-Nice 7 times; this type of one-week dominance is something I expect to be a matter of course for EBH throughout his career.
 
blackcat said:
just temper the anti-doping line. Bound to be betrayed.

Hagen is about the most talented rider besides Contador in the peloton. I would like to see him keep on dropping one kg a year, and in 5 years ride GC. In the interim, go for green, and attempt to win all the doyennes. Big chance at San Remo. Feel sorry for Hendo, surely he felt he was gonna be the first choice for field sprints.

Pretty much agree with this post.

I only know of him from the races he won on Italian broadcasts and what the Italian cycling comment crew has said about him, which is only about praise. A couple of thoughts, however:

I think he could possibly become this generations best classics man. None of the races, except, perhaps PR, is beyond his grasp. On the GC account, I'm less certain. In fact I have some reasonable doubts. And, leaving doping asside, there are two (and once three) young riders, basically in his age category, who have demonstrated superior class in the Grand Tours: obvioulsy AC, then Andy Schleck, and, thirdly, I would also say that controversial Ricardo Ricco.

Hagen needs to greatly improve his climbing skills to concievably have any chance in a three week event. And he'll never be better than AC in this discipline. Consequently, I think he's better off focusing on the classics. But as it has been said, the man will yet surprise us.

PS. He'd do well to demonstrate a least a bit of respect, if not genuine interest, for the past champions and history of this sport. It is making him quite rich and to not do so, is in poor taste.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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rhubroma said:
Pretty much agree with this post.

I only know of him from the races he won on Italian broadcasts and what the Italian cycling comment crew has said about him, which is only about praise. A couple of thoughts, however:

I think he could possibly become this generations best classics man. None of the races, except, perhaps PR, is beyond his grasp. On the GC account, I'm less certain. In fact I have some reasonable doubts. And, leaving doping asside, there are two (and once three) young riders, basically in his age category, who have demonstrated superior class in the Grand Tours: obvioulsy AC, then Andy Schleck, and, thirdly, I would also say that controversial Ricardo Ricco.

Hagen needs to greatly improve his climbing skills to concievably have any chance in a three week event. And he'll never be better than AC in this discipline. Consequently, I think he's better off focusing on the classics. But as it has been said, the man will yet surprise us.

PS. He'd do well to demonstrate a least a bit of respect, if not genuine interest, for the past champions and history of this sport. It is making him quite rich and to not do so, is in poor taste.

Well written and I couldn't agree more!! However, I don't think Hagen is bing disrespectful in his non-interest in the past. It is not like he is flaunting it in the face of anyone. It is actually kinda refreshing to an extent. Here is a guy who is a very talented rider...he rides not because of what others have done...but because he loves what he is doing. I also think all this is a little overblown...my guess is he is more aware of the history than he lets on.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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rhubroma said:
Pretty much agree with this post.

I only know of him from the races he won on Italian broadcasts and what the Italian cycling comment crew has said about him, which is only about praise. A couple of thoughts, however:

I think he could possibly become this generations best classics man. None of the races, except, perhaps PR, is beyond his grasp. On the GC account, I'm less certain. In fact I have some reasonable doubts. And, leaving doping asside, there are two (and once three) young riders, basically in his age category, who have demonstrated superior class in the Grand Tours: obvioulsy AC, then Andy Schleck, and, thirdly, I would also say that controversial Ricardo Ricco.

Hagen needs to greatly improve his climbing skills to concievably have any chance in a three week event. And he'll never be better than AC in this discipline. Consequently, I think he's better off focusing on the classics. But as it has been said, the man will yet surprise us.

PS. He'd do well to demonstrate a least a bit of respect, if not genuine interest, for the past champions and history of this sport. It is making him quite rich and to not do so, is in poor taste.

think Roubaix is one of his perfect races, as he can finish in the velodrome. His chrono threshold shows his ability, and wont be disadvantaged on a flat parcours. Wins Gent Wevelgem riding away with one other. Can win Roubaix.
 
Jul 24, 2009
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I don't see him winning a GT, but as others have said the shorter stage races should end up being well-suited to him, as well as a large number of the classics. I also see him being the cutest rider in the peloton for several years to come. He flashed me a grin on a climb at the Tour of Britain last year, and I've been under his spell ever since.

What do you mean "off-topic"?

As for "respect", the thing that is making him rich is riding his bike, not being able to recite facts about others who have ridden them. He's under no obligation to care about the achievements of Merckx or anyone else. It's not disrespectful to not know that, just as it's not disrespectful for me to not know about who has managed to claim the most unemployment benefit in Britain's history.
taiwan said:
What does he mean?
... well?
 
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His race schedule is looking pretty good...

Omloop and Kurne this weekend
Tirreno Adriatico
Milan-San Remo
E3 Pris
Gent Wevelgem
Roubaix
schelderpris tbc
 
Jun 15, 2009
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Skip Madness said:
I don't see him winning a GT, but as others have said the shorter stage races should end up being well-suited to him, as well as a large number of the classics. I also see him being the cutest rider in the peloton for several years to come. He flashed me a grin on a climb at the Tour of Britain last year, and I've been under his spell ever since.

What do you mean "off-topic"?

As for "respect", the thing that is making him rich is riding his bike, not being able to recite facts about others who have ridden them. He's under no obligation to care about the achievements of Merckx or anyone else. It's not disrespectful to not know that, just as it's not disrespectful for me to not know about who has managed to claim the most unemployment benefit in Britain's history.

... well?

Edvald is a shy, timid, softspoken guy at the tender age of 22, from a rural backwater of a rural backwater country. He's thoroughly intrigued by what he can do on his bike, he's NOT media-savvy, still very much a work in progress, and just as the Romanian band Fanfare Ciocarlia play the way they do because scholared musicians haven't had a chance yet to say they can't play that way, he's still redefining his own limits. Reading up on cycling history, learning to pay "lip-service" where credit is due, because it's the clever back-slapping strategy that's expected, is somewhat out of his range, yet. And I rue the day that it will be. I said, earlier, that EBH is "Nature Boy". He is. Not an evil, scheming bone in his body. He's the real deal, the future of cycling.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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hektoren said:
Edvald is a shy, timid, softspoken guy at the tender age of 22, from a rural backwater of a rural backwater country. He's thoroughly intrigued by what he can do on his bike, he's NOT media-savvy, still very much a work in progress, and just as the Romanian band Fanfare Ciocarlia play the way they do because scholared musicians haven't had a chance yet to say they can't play that way, he's still redefining his own limits. Reading up on cycling history, learning to pay "lip-service" where credit is due, because it's the clever back-slapping strategy that's expected, is somewhat out of his range, yet. And I rue the day that it will be. I said, earlier, that EBH is "Nature Boy". He is. Not an evil, scheming bone in his body. He's the real deal, the future of cycling.

hektoren, you seem to know very much about Edvald!! Please tell more...I am interested in what types of training he does. I have heard all these stories about how he trains, through the harsh winter, etc. In the link above it was cool to see him with the skis!! Does he come from a sporting family? By your last sentence...he seems like a very respectable person...in addition to being a beast on the bike!!
 
blackcat said:
think Roubaix is one of his perfect races, as he can finish in the velodrome. His chrono threshold shows his ability, and wont be disadvantaged on a flat parcours. Wins Gent Wevelgem riding away with one other. Can win Roubaix.

I honestly don't know if he even road it before...in any case, it takes a "particular" rider for Roubaix. If you're right, then hey, hats off to the guy.
 
Apr 25, 2009
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Can't help thinking the same and (I'm not a betting man honestly!) at 16-1, or 4-1 with an each way bet, represents very tempting odds for Roubaix, I think!

I know he's relatively untested, but I think he can win just about any flattish parcours he turns his mind to and certainly the more gruelling the better.
 
EBH has only had one season where he for the first time tested the spring classics so eventhough he won Gent.Wevelgem last year I think it will still take a season or two before he will be perfectly comfortable with these types of races. It's not like he's belgian and grew up on those roads...
 
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ingsve said:
EBH has only had one season where he for the first time tested the spring classics so eventhough he won Gent.Wevelgem last year I think it will still take a season or two before he will be perfectly comfortable with these types of races. It's not like he's belgian and grew up on those roads...

but if it snows?
 
Apr 25, 2009
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ingsve said:
EBH has only had one season where he for the first time tested the spring classics so eventhough he won Gent.Wevelgem last year I think it will still take a season or two before he will be perfectly comfortable with these types of races. It's not like he's belgian and grew up on those roads...

Of course not - Roubaix won't be comfortable for sure! But he's a big lad with big lungs and a will to win. He won't worry about who's meant to win and he won't be there to make the numbers up, I'm sure. I'm really looking forward to seeing how he does in the Classics this year.