Favourite "Dirty" Performance

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Jun 12, 2010
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Slight deviation from the infamous GT stages .

Franchesco Mosers hour records of 84 must be in the hall of shame.

Not only was the aquipment rule book rather over looked ( some would say "re interpetated" ) but he had the gaul to do it all again 24 hours later.

Theres a strong case to argue blood packing and the place the sport is now began in earnest with them records.
An absalute farce . I thought so at the time and everything thats come out since has confirmed it.
 
May 3, 2010
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Darryl Webster said:
Slight deviation from the infamous GT stages .

Franchesco Mosers hour records of 84 must be in the hall of shame.

Not only was the aquipment rule book rather over looked ( some would say "re interpetated" ) but he had the gaul to do it all again 24 hours later.

Theres a strong case to argue blood packing and the place the sport is now began in earnest with them records.
An absalute farce . I thought so at the time and everything thats come out since has confirmed it.
Wasn't that where Ferrari made his name as part of Moser's team?
 

Polish

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Mar 11, 2009
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This year's LBL was an exciting one for sure!

Although Taylor Phinney would disagree with me:(
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Polish

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Mar 11, 2009
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VeloCity said:
Hincapie winning the toughest mountain stage in the '05 Tour. Biggest joke I ever saw.
That was one of my LEAST favorites:(
Big George sucked Oscar P's wheel most of the climb....
If you are going to dope - ATTACK for goodness sakes
 
Jun 12, 2010
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Mrs John Murphy said:
Wasn't that where Ferrari made his name as part of Moser's team?
Im not sure re Farrari involvement. I thought it was a Dr Conconi? ( not certan of the spelling)
Im sure a few here will know more detail.;)
 
Another obscure one, but the 2008 Vuelta a Asturias was pretty ridiculous.

Stage 1: LA-MSS sends four riders to the front to force the pace on the final category 2 climb. The pace they force splits them away from the rest of the pack, and only Stefano Garzelli is able to join them. The four then TTT away while Garzelli sits on, and finish over a minute ahead of the field, with Vicioso outsprinting Garzelli. A further LA-MSS rider stays with the élite group of chasers only 1'20" back, while most of the rest of the péloton comes in at 2'39".

Stage 2a- bunch sprint. Garzelli takes time bonuses and lead.

Stage 2b- place 3 riders in top 20 of ITT, acquiring 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th on GC. Next rider in 13th.

Stage 3- Garzelli moves into 2nd place with a sprint win.

Stage 4- place rider lying 5th overall (and 4th of the LA-MSS riders) in the break of the day. Pace the péloton throughout nonetheless. Rider in break drops back to group, then gets on the front and rides all but two other LA-MSS riders and Koldo Gil off his wheel. Fourth and fifth LA-MSS riders monitor the rest of the front group. Gain another 2 minutes on teams classification. Now placed 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 8th and 11th on GC.

Stage 5 - lead the bunch home after letting the break go. Win the teams classification by 7 minutes in a short Tour with few gaps between riders.
 

Dr. Maserati

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Jun 19, 2009
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Darryl Webster said:
Im not sure re Farrari involvement. I thought it was a Dr Conconi? ( not certan of the spelling)
Im sure a few here will know more detail.;)
Great to have you here Darryl!!


Dr. Conconi's able and willing assistant was a young Dr. Michele Ferrari. ;)
It was at this point he realised he preferred working with Cycling teams then in a boring lab.

BTW - thanks to whoever posted the Alpe d'Huez 2003 video- pretty incredible, although my vote will go for Riis in 96.....
 
Jun 12, 2010
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Dr. Maserati said:
Great to have you here Darryl!!


Dr. Conconi's able and willing assistant was a young Dr. Michele Ferrari. ;)
It was at this point he realised he preferred working with Cycling teams then in a boring lab.

BTW - thanks to whoever posted the Alpe d'Huez 2003 video- pretty incredible, although my vote will go for Riis in 96.....
Well there we have it peeps..the trail began with Moser...peeps beet a path to Conconni @ Farraris door..were for a price the little known of world of blood doping could be explored. Think Rominger was "customer"?.
Latter when Armstrong was diagnosed with cancer if im understanding it wasnt Amgen on board with his treatment?.
One can imagine the chat:
LA " Can you cure me?"
Amgen " We can do better than that"
La..." Tell me more":D

Add together what Lance already knew with the expertise of Amgen and you have the recipy for some serious jet fuel I`d suspect? geneticly modified epo?

Who needs Cludo to play eh? :)
 
freecycle said:
A dirty performance that not many people know about, especially Australians, is the winner of he 1997 World Duathlon Championships in Spain. Jonathan Hall was on "the tackle" in 1997, when he won the World Duathlon Championships, then all through 1998 when he rode as an Amateur in Spain and racked up 30 odd victories. He then turned pro with festina, just after the festina affair and had a falling out with his at the time “trainer/coach/doctor” and thus couldn't get on the gear, and did absolutely nothing in the pro ranks as a result.

He now works as a coach as the VIS and it makes me sick to think of him as a role model to young people.
:rolleyes:
Highly unlikely.
 
May 12, 2010
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mastersracer said:
how about the 2003 stage to alpe d'huez; like the doper hall of fame: Mayo, Beloki, Hamilton, Vino, LA, Ullrich etc. going up so fast they have a hard time making it around the switchbacks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-y38WZAtgc&feature=PlayList&p=82CBEE3CDC2D917A&playnext_from=PL&playnext=1&index=22
I remember how I was in shock seeing USPS riding the Uniballer into the climb. That was sheer terror.

Not bad as well, Piti almost unable to lift his arms in Courchevel, 2005:

 
Jun 25, 2009
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mastersracer said:
how about the 2003 stage to alpe d'huez; like the doper hall of fame: Mayo, Beloki, Hamilton, Vino, LA, Ullrich etc. going up so fast they have a hard time making it around the switchbacks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-y38WZAtgc&feature=PlayList&p=82CBEE3CDC2D917A&playnext_from=PL&playnext=1&index=22
Going by the alpe d'huez times on wiki most people werent going up that much faster than in the late 80s. Iban mayo did a fast time but after that they were doing around 41 minutes. Ullrich did a 42.42.

http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/road/2003/tour03/?id=results/stage8

I know that how the rest of the stage went, and earlier stages went, will have an effect, but i would still have thought that they would have gone up quicker than that. Is my assumption wrong or are the wiki times unreliable?
 
Aug 13, 2009
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Skibby the bush kangaroo said:
Obscure one:
Peter Luttenberger's solo win to Grindlewald in the 1996 Tour du Suisse. Memorable because he rode permanently out of the saddle for about 25km.
Not so sure if that's really a discriminator. Historically there are people that prefer to climb that way (think lots of the Columbians) and at about the same size/weight as Pantani, I'd guess he's not a sprinter. I'm not saying that he was clean, just that climbing out of the saddle for a relatively long distance isn't positive evidence of doping.
 
May 3, 2010
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Uniballer in 1999, because it was the moment I realised just how worthless all the claims about a 'cleaned up sport' from the UCI and journalists were.

We had a guy who in his previous attempts to ride the TDF had managed just once to make it out of the first week, when he had made it out he had been in the bus in most of the mountains, he'd been a below average TTer (being passed by Mig), and all of a sudden he was riding everyone off his wheel.

This was the point I realised that all the claims about turning the corner on doping was just ********.
 
Not to defend Lance but he was just 23 when he finished 36th in the 1995 TdF. That's not spectacular but you don't get such a result without some climbing ability. Then, in 1996, he destroyed people like Rominger in the Tour Du Pont, and there was a lot of anticipation to see him in the TdF. And in 1998 he was 4th in the Vuelta and in the ITT World Championships. Of course he wasn't clean in 1999, but I don't think the transformation came that out of the blue or was that sudden.

If anything, what makes me raise an eyebrow is the contrast between his early 1998 season, when he was close to giving up and retiring shortly after his comeback, and his late season.
 
May 3, 2010
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I don't disagree but for me it was the TDF performance that brought home to me that the sport hadn't changed despite its claims, and the way in which 'post-cancer improvement' was wheeled out as an excuse, and that if you questioned him you were somehow pro-cancer.

You cite his 1995 performance he finished almost an hour and half down on Mig, lost 6 minutes and 5 minutes in the two ITTs, 20 minutes on the D'Huez stage, 17 minutes on stage 9 to La Plagne, 28 minutes down on stage 14.

In 1996 he was most notable for having his **** kicked by Gilles Bouvard and then crying off.

There was nothing in his first 4 performances that suggested that he had any prowess in the high mountains, or as a TTer.

And yet in 1999 he could suddenly do it all.

As a fan who had naively bought into the rhetoric from the UCI and the press that the sport was cleaning up, for such an unbelievable improvement to be made, was a ride too far.
 
Yeah, in retrospect I agree with you, but at the time it did seem possible to analyze his 1995 and 1996 results in view of his 1999 TdF win, especially when compared to the kind of stunts some other people were pulling at the time without being called out.
 
May 3, 2010
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I agree that all sorts of reasons were trotted out but they seemed to so implausible at the time and even more so now. As I say, for me, it is the dirty performance that sticks in my mind because it was the point that I realised that the sport was as dirty as it had been in 1997.

I think the other thing that angered me was that the equally doped Pantani had been kicked out of the Giro (and this would ultimately lead to the downward spiral of his life and end up in his death) while Armstrong was protected by the UCI and the media who saw him as a cash-cow.
 
Nov 17, 2009
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Mrs John Murphy said:
I don't disagree but for me it was the TDF performance that brought home to me that the sport hadn't changed despite its claims, and the way in which 'post-cancer improvement' was wheeled out as an excuse, and that if you questioned him you were somehow pro-cancer.

You cite his 1995 performance he finished almost an hour and half down on Mig, lost 6 minutes and 5 minutes in the two ITTs, 20 minutes on the D'Huez stage, 17 minutes on stage 9 to La Plagne, 28 minutes down on stage 14.

In 1996 he was most notable for having his **** kicked by Gilles Bouvard and then crying off.

There was nothing in his first 4 performances that suggested that he had any prowess in the high mountains, or as a TTer.

And yet in 1999 he could suddenly do it all.

As a fan who had naively bought into the rhetoric from the UCI and the press that the sport was cleaning up, for such an unbelievable improvement to be made, was a ride too far.
While Lance may have increased his doping program... focusing on how far back he finished to Indurain in TT's isn't exactly fair. Indurain didn't ride in 1999... he may still have pasted Lance by 2-3 minutes. It would probably be more realistic to compare him to Zulle (who finished second in the stage 8 TT in 1999).

He was about a minute down to Zulle in the 56km TT in 1995... and a minute ahead in the 56km TT in 1999.

While the doping was definitely going on... I'm not sure how much of that 2-minute increase in his relation to Zulle was from him doping more, Zulle doping less... or natural increases in his ability that went along with the doping.
 

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