Teams & Riders Froome Talk Only

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JosephK said:
LOL at Froome getting booed by the spectators up the hill on Stage 15 after the wheel change. Even better: Phil Liggett's bewilderment at why fans could possibly be booing the Great One -- no clue at all as to why that might be happening, total astonishment. :lol:[/quote

https://twitter.com/theraceradio/status/886609232937705476
Today's finish is only 3km from where Romain Bardet grew up is a good reason for the booing, isn't it
 
JosephK said:
LOL at Froome getting booed by the spectators up the hill on Stage 15 after the wheel change. Even better: Phil Liggett's bewilderment at why fans could possibly be booing the Great One -- no clue at all as to why that might be happening, total astonishment. :lol:
Froome talking about how tired everyone is, but the team hangs on to the sprint teams doing 80 km/hour on Saturday, then Sunday's uphill sprint back to the bunch, so "boo" say I too! (at least he's not getting pee or Jiffy bags thrown at him) :D
 
Listening to Lance's Stages podcast. In the latest one he seems confused at how many mechanicals Dawg has. Then the co-presenter asks what it could be. LA says it could Pinarello, Shimano or many other things.

Why doesnt any of his team mates have so many mechanicals?
 
Oct 16, 2010
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MartinGT said:
Listening to Lance's Stages podcast. In the latest one he seems confused at how many mechanicals Dawg has. Then the co-presenter asks what it could be. LA says it could Pinarello, Shimano or many other things.

Why doesnt any of his team mates have so many mechanicals?
If he's not riding with a motor, then without those mechanicals he'd now have two odd minutes more on his competitors.

Two.
Minutes.

That's alot. No marginal gains can compete with that.
Expecting Froome to abandon Pinarello and Shimano next season then. :rolleyes:
 
Feb 24, 2014
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A few scenarios

1. Froome is the greatest physical specimen of an athlete that has ever graced the planet and we should all laud him as such. He is the greatest cyclist of all time and triumphs over all adversity with his single minded focus and superior physiological strength. The rear wheel change and the time to be made up reinforces this.

2. There is a motor in the hub (or wheel rim) that was starting to malfunction and he had to swap a rear wheel with Kwiatkowski who had a functioning one.

3. The motor is in bottom bracket and the rear wheel change was just a rear wheel change but the motor got him back to the GC group.

4. There is no motor but instead he is doped to his eyeballs with whatever the pharmacy industry can produce.

My money is on 4 but not ruling out 2 and 3.
 
Re:

deeno1975 said:
A few scenarios

1. Froome is the greatest physical specimen of an athlete that has ever graced the planet and we should all laud him as such. He is the greatest cyclist of all time and triumphs over all adversity with his single minded focus and superior physiological strength. The rear wheel change and the time to be made up reinforces this.

2. There is a motor in the hub (or wheel rim) that was starting to malfunction and he had to swap a rear wheel with Kwiatkowski who had a functioning one.

3. The motor is in bottom bracket and the rear wheel change was just a rear wheel change but the motor got him back to the GC group.

4. There is no motor but instead he is doped to his eyeballs with whatever the pharmacy industry can produce.

My money is on 4 but not ruling out 2 and 3.
For 1, I would add, "And he is able to do this against rivals who are using motors and/or doped to their eyeballs".
 
Aug 26, 2014
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RedheadDane said:
Cycle Chic said:


FROOME with the ARM WARMERS again on the rest day - no-one else has them
Aaah, yes! Arm Warmer Doping. It's the new EPO.

I know what you're insinuating.
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.

DanielSong39 said:
deeno1975 said:
A few scenarios

1. Froome is the greatest physical specimen of an athlete that has ever graced the planet and we should all laud him as such. He is the greatest cyclist of all time and triumphs over all adversity with his single minded focus and superior physiological strength. The rear wheel change and the time to be made up reinforces this.

2. There is a motor in the hub (or wheel rim) that was starting to malfunction and he had to swap a rear wheel with Kwiatkowski who had a functioning one.

3. The motor is in bottom bracket and the rear wheel change was just a rear wheel change but the motor got him back to the GC group.

4. There is no motor but instead he is doped to his eyeballs with whatever the pharmacy industry can produce.

My money is on 4 but not ruling out 2 and 3.
For 1, I would add, "And he is able to do this against rivals who are using motors and/or doped to their eyeballs".
I would have thought 4 until I saw that weird stage finish the other day. I thought his chain had come off or his gears failed, it was so strange.
 
Aug 26, 2014
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RedheadDane said:
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.
Not exactly... that's pretty darn hot! And claiming they're hiding needle-marks is too obvious, so there's gonna be some benefit in the arm warmers themselves.

:cool:
Sarcasm ;o)

If there was a benefit in arm warmers, why not the whole team? Don't you want everyone to enjoy the improvements considering it's such a small thing to do?
 
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Electress said:
RedheadDane said:
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.
Not exactly... that's pretty darn hot! And claiming they're hiding needle-marks is too obvious, so there's gonna be some benefit in the arm warmers themselves.

:cool:
Sarcasm ;o)

If there was a benefit in arm warmers, why not the whole team? Don't you want everyone to enjoy the improvements considering it's such a small thing to do?
Aaah... but that's where the conspiracy theories come in. :p
 
Arm warmers block the sun, I've worn them on particularly sunny days at times when I've felt I might burn. Wasn't very pleasant at times as mine are wool or quite heavy lined ones but they did the job when a couple of mates got burned. Conversely, some of the bunch were absolutely fine without them. I keep meaning to try find some light ones for times like this.
 
Re:

RedheadDane said:
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.
Not exactly... that's pretty darn hot! And claiming they're hiding needle-marks is too obvious, so there's gonna be some benefit in the arm warmers themselves.

:cool:
Try to keep up. Arm warmers are not to hide the needle marks they are because you get a bad case of the "chills" after a blood transfusion. Hamilton explained the clearly in his book along with it being a medical fact.

 
Re: Re:

thehog said:
RedheadDane said:
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.
Not exactly... that's pretty darn hot! And claiming they're hiding needle-marks is too obvious, so there's gonna be some benefit in the arm warmers themselves.

:cool:
Try to keep up. Arm warmers are not to hide the needle marks they are because you get a bad case of the "chills" after a blood transfusion. Hamilton explained the clearly in his book along with it being a medical fact.

Still too obvious!
 
Jul 5, 2009
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Re: Re:

RedheadDane said:
thehog said:
RedheadDane said:
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.
Not exactly... that's pretty darn hot! And claiming they're hiding needle-marks is too obvious, so there's gonna be some benefit in the arm warmers themselves.

:cool:
Try to keep up. Arm warmers are not to hide the needle marks they are because you get a bad case of the "chills" after a blood transfusion. Hamilton explained the clearly in his book along with it being a medical fact.

Still too obvious!
The effects don't last though. It's just that you've literally lowered your body temperature by introducing a liter of very cold fluid. Once you warm up again, you're good to go.

John Swanson
 
Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
RedheadDane said:
thehog said:
RedheadDane said:
Current temperature in southern france between 29 and 33 degrees. Definitely arm warmer kind of weather.
Not exactly... that's pretty darn hot! And claiming they're hiding needle-marks is too obvious, so there's gonna be some benefit in the arm warmers themselves.

:cool:
Try to keep up. Arm warmers are not to hide the needle marks they are because you get a bad case of the "chills" after a blood transfusion. Hamilton explained the clearly in his book along with it being a medical fact.

Still too obvious!
The effects don't last though. It's just that you've literally lowered your body temperature by introducing a liter of very cold fluid. Once you warm up again, you're good to go.

John Swanson
Has nothing to do with body temperature. If you receive a transfusion the morning of, around 24 hours you'll feel the symptoms of the newly injected blood and if in hospital you'd be treated by keep warm for that period up to 3 days. It's doesn't wear off quickly as you suggest.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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We saw the needle and bandaid mark on Bardet's arm the other day.
Froome and some others with long sleeves on rest days.
Needles are still en vogue. And understandably so!
Stage 12 showed you can't rely on your motor to work for you all the time.

And meanwhile bike and wheel changes are turning into a no-go.
It's so naughties, when literally nobody was paying attention to them (see Floyd).
Now they're raising too many eyebrows.
We had Cipo commenting on Contador in the Giro.
Jalabert and the French now bullying Froome.
All because of those innocent bike/wheel swaps.

So it's a long way to go before we can discard the good old needle and high octane doping.
 
Jul 5, 2009
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Re: Re:

thehog said:
Has nothing to do with body temperature. If you receive a transfusion the morning of, around 24 hours you'll feel the symptoms of the newly injected blood and if in hospital you'd be treated by keep warm for that period up to 3 days. It's doesn't wear off quickly as you suggest.
Where did you get that from? ~10% of patients develop a fever, but I've never heard that you get the chills (would mean you're either hypothermic or have a fever) that lasts for a few days. https://www.pathology.med.umich.edu/bloodbank/manual/bbch_7/

John Swanson
 

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