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Teams & Riders Froome Talk Only

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Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
Has nothing to do with body temperature. If you receive a transfusion the morning of, around 24 hours you'll feel the symptoms of the newly injected blood and if in hospital you'd be treated by keep warm for that period up to 3 days. It's doesn't wear off quickly as you suggest.

Where did you get that from? ~10% of patients develop a fever, but I've never heard that you get the chills (would mean you're either hypothermic or have a fever) that lasts for a few days. https://www.pathology.med.umich.edu/bloodbank/manual/bbch_7/

John Swanson

You can type into google “symptoms of blood transfusion” and chills comes up every time, plus every cyclist who has talked about it like Hamilton, Jascke states they get the “chills”. Is that hard to understand?

Transfusion reaction symptoms include:
back pain.
dark urine.
chills.
fainting or dizziness.
fever.
flank pain.
skin flushing.
shortness of breath.
 
MartinGT said:
Listening to Lance's Stages podcast. In the latest one he seems confused at how many mechanicals Dawg has. Then the co-presenter asks what it could be. LA says it could Pinarello, Shimano or many other things.

Why doesnt any of his team mates have so many mechanicals?

That is what I was wondering. One would think that Froome's bike would be the one getting the serious going over after every stage to make sure everything is in order. Quite strange.
 
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Re: Re:

thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
Has nothing to do with body temperature. If you receive a transfusion the morning of, around 24 hours you'll feel the symptoms of the newly injected blood and if in hospital you'd be treated by keep warm for that period up to 3 days. It's doesn't wear off quickly as you suggest.

Where did you get that from? ~10% of patients develop a fever, but I've never heard that you get the chills (would mean you're either hypothermic or have a fever) that lasts for a few days. https://www.pathology.med.umich.edu/bloodbank/manual/bbch_7/

John Swanson

You can type into google “symptoms of blood transfusion” and chills comes up every time, plus every cyclist who has talked about it like Hamilton, Jascke states they get the “chills”. Is that hard to understand?

Transfusion reaction symptoms include:
back pain.
dark urine.
chills.
fainting or dizziness.
fever.
flank pain.
skin flushing.
shortness of breath.

I'm guessing you got that from here... Very authoritative, unlike what I gave. http://www.healthline.com/health/transfusion-reaction-hemolytic

Horrible to think about all those riders gasping, fainting and peeing black goo. I guess those arm warmers fix that up too.

John Swanson
 
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Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson
 
Oct 6, 2009
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Re:

sniper said:
We saw the needle and bandaid mark on Bardet's arm the other day.
Froome and some others with long sleeves on rest days.
Needles are still en vogue. And understandably so!
Stage 12 showed you can't rely on your motor to work for you all the time.

And meanwhile bike and wheel changes are turning into a no-go.
It's so naughties, when literally nobody was paying attention to them (see Floyd).
Now they're raising too many eyebrows.
We had Cipo commenting on Contador in the Giro.
Jalabert and the French now bullying Froome.
All because of those innocent bike/wheel swaps.

So it's a long way to go before we can discard the good old needle and high octane doping.

To be fair, a needle and band-aid mark could come from a blood test by anti-doping testers. I would think a guy not hiding such would maybe be more likely for it to have come from a test, while a guy getting a transfusion would make an attempt to cover the mark.
 
Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson

So Hamilton lied. Good to know. Excellent work :cool:
 
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Re: Re:

thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
Has nothing to do with body temperature. If you receive a transfusion the morning of, around 24 hours you'll feel the symptoms of the newly injected blood and if in hospital you'd be treated by keep warm for that period up to 3 days. It's doesn't wear off quickly as you suggest.

Where did you get that from? ~10% of patients develop a fever, but I've never heard that you get the chills (would mean you're either hypothermic or have a fever) that lasts for a few days. https://www.pathology.med.umich.edu/bloodbank/manual/bbch_7/

John Swanson

You can type into google “symptoms of blood transfusion” and chills comes up every time, plus every cyclist who has talked about it like Hamilton, Jascke states they get the “chills”. Is that hard to understand?

Transfusion reaction symptoms include:
back pain.
dark urine.
chills.
fainting or dizziness.
fever.
flank pain.
skin flushing.
shortness of breath.

The symptoms you are referring to are as a result of incompatible blood transfusions and can be a serious, even life threatening event.
Having that said a lot of patients, particularly those that receive blood cooler than room temperature often complain of feeling cold or having a cold sensation up their arms.
 
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Re: Re:

thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson

So Hamilton lied. Good to know. Excellent work :cool:

Hamilton versus the entire body of science concerning transfusions. Good argument. Show me where Hamilton talks about passing out and peeing black goo.

John Swanson
 
Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson

So Hamilton lied. Good to know. Excellent work :cool:

Hamilton versus the entire body of science concerning transfusions. Good argument. Show me where Hamilton talks about passing out and peeing black goo.

John Swanson

2004 Tour for Phonak that's exactly what occurred to Hamilton, as detailed in his book.

Have you read is book, I guess not considering your responses.
 
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Re: Re:

thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson

So Hamilton lied. Good to know. Excellent work :cool:

Hamilton versus the entire body of science concerning transfusions. Good argument. Show me where Hamilton talks about passing out and peeing black goo.

John Swanson

2004 Tour for Phonak that's exactly what occurred to Hamilton, as detailed in his book.

Have you read is book, I guess not considering your responses.

You win. That explains the blankets and arm warmers for three days, which is what happens in the hospital for anyone receiving a transfusion. Poor transfusion patients. Unconsciousness and chills everywhere. Black goo pee.

John Swanson
 
Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson

So Hamilton lied. Good to know. Excellent work :cool:

Hamilton versus the entire body of science concerning transfusions. Good argument. Show me where Hamilton talks about passing out and peeing black goo.

John Swanson

2004 Tour for Phonak that's exactly what occurred to Hamilton, as detailed in his book.

Have you read is book, I guess not considering your responses.

You win. That explains the blankets and arm warmers for three days, which is what happens in the hospital for anyone receiving a transfusion. Poor transfusion patients. Unconsciousness and chills everywhere. Black goo pee.

John Swanson

I did win because I've read the evidence from Hamilton and also many others like Jaksche.
 
Re: Re:

thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
thehog said:
ScienceIsCool said:
Like I said.

Quote: "Cause: Fever and chills during transfusion are thought to be caused by recipient antibodies reacting with white cell antigens or white cell fragments in the blood product or due to cytokines which accumulate in the blood product during storage. Fever occurs more commonly with platelet transfusion (10-30%) than red cell transfusion (1-2%)."

http://www.rch.org.au/bloodtrans/adverse_effects/Adverse_effects_of_transfusion/

John Swanson

So Hamilton lied. Good to know. Excellent work :cool:

Hamilton versus the entire body of science concerning transfusions. Good argument. Show me where Hamilton talks about passing out and peeing black goo.

John Swanson

2004 Tour for Phonak that's exactly what occurred to Hamilton, as detailed in his book.

Have you read is book, I guess not considering your responses.
The Hamilton symptoms during the 2004 tour are caused by a bad blood bag tough, he's saying so himself in the book. He could not have been mentally sound at the time, he still tried to ride the next day, he should have gone to the hospital instead, he was risking his life there.
 
Re: Re:

rick james said:
deeno1975 said:
sniper said:
when Bardet went, Froome couldn't respond until his hands had gone onto the hoods.


Good spot, saw that too, at around 31km to go... Looked like he pushed a button as oppose to change gear...
so what about the guy doing he attacking? nothing?
Cleans of course. Wonderful test results, lost some fat, freed his inner chimp and did not even start from zigzagging.
 
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Re: Re:

sniper said:
ontheroad said:
sniper said:
when Bardet went, Froome couldn't respond until his hands had gone onto the hoods.

Noticed the high velocity cadence by Froome when Bardet attacked, never noticed the hand movement.
Go to 14:10.
Bardet jumps, Froome then with the hands to the hoods, high cadence and idiotic stem watching (includes a nice slo-mo):
http://www.cyclingfans.com/node/29980

Yep I saw that. Why is this fellow getting away with this??? Well we said that for years about LA and but the truth finally came out
 
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Re:

sniper said:
LeMond expressed doubts about Froome's high-cadence attacking style in the L'Équipe interview. "He turned his legs at a high speed, but it's not effective and contrary to all physiological laws," LeMond is reported as saying, also dismissing the idea of Team Sky's marginal gains philosophy. "You can't get a gap on small gears," LeMond argued.
http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/greg-lemond-miracles-in-cycling-still-dont-exist/
Totally agree, how are you able to generate that amount of power on these small gears? to get that type of cadence on a mountain you have to be on the smaller gears and yet you are generating all that power?? Doesn't add up. Probably explains LA too. But for Froome to be getting away with it in this day and age? with all the Technology we have today is baffling.

I suggest that UCI will get 3 Bikes from the teams for the leaders 2 weeks before GT. And before each stage the leader should come and get the bike from UCI. Except I also don't trust UCI!
 

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