General News Thread

Page 471 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Limburg hills aren't really that great to avoid a bunch sprint unless you put in a bunch of them or finish almost directly on top of them. For a Tour route I'd way prefer a hard stage in the Belgian Ardennes, perhaps using the hardest climbs of the Ardennes and using them closer to the finish than the standard LBL type setup.

I'm not against the hilly finish in the first Tour week, but I don't like overreliance on Mur de Bretagne, and I'd love a proper Murito everyone and then.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Merckx competed in an era when cycling was not nearly as globalised as it is now and as a result far less competitive, not really sure how you can compare riders from such different eras.
Agreed, nobody will ever beat Merckx' record and therefore, he is by default the best there ever was and the standard for everyone to be measured against. But try plopping Pogacar into a race against Merckx, and you'll see who'd win.
 
The same when people make lists of current best athletes and it's a mix of men and women, that is also a bit nonsenical.
They often put Serena Williams near the top but there are hundreds of active male tennis players who would beat her so it does not really make sense. In Great Britain they always combine the sportsperson of the year award which I always thought is silly.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Well, except for Marita Koch and her cohort . . .
I'd also say that in sports like XC skiing the sport has become less competitive, you only have very few nations at the top nowadays.
With cycling it's more about specialization of riders and the field becoming even more international, but on the other hand you have the shirking talent pool in countries like Italy, France and Spain, that evens things out a bit.
 
With cycling it's more about specialization of riders and the field becoming even more international, but on the other hand you have the shirking talent pool in countries like Italy, France and Spain, that evens things out a bit.
I think actually cycling is less international than ten-fifteen years ago with basically no one around today in the wt from Eastern Europe except some super talented individuals. Most development teams also seem to pick from the same countries.
 
international, but on the other hand you have the shirking talent pool in countries like Italy, France and Spain, that evens things out a bit.
I don't think the talent pool is shrinking in those countries, the level of riders in other countries has risen so much it means a lot of the riders from countries like Italy, France and Spain that used to make up a lot of the peloton and would have been pro decades ago are not good enough now.
 
I don't think the talent pool is shrinking in those countries, the level of riders in other countries has risen so much it means a lot of the riders from countries like Italy, France and Spain that used to make up a lot of the peloton and would have been pro decades ago are not good enough now.
That's probably true when it comes to the pro ranks, but the number of kids riding in the junior ranks and at an even younger age is getting smaller and smaller in those countries, the talent pool is shrinking.
An example would be the number of male junior riders in Italy over the last few years.
2017: 1.684
2018: 1.664
2019: 1.567
2020: 1.516
Source: https://www.federciclismo.it/it/document/i-numeri-della-fci/96293f2d-296b-4a70-bde8-3b34c4d2f5d3/

That's a significant drop in only a few years and the number of athletes was much bigger in the 90ies and early 2000s.
Edit: Those numbers also include MTB, CX and Track cyclists.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Sandisfan

ASK THE COMMUNITY