Guess Who - Game

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Male? Yes
Active? Yes
Name that starts with the letter 'T'? No
On WT team? Yes
Raced this year? Yes
More than two names? Yes
From country with GT? No
From country with Monument? No
Colombian? No
From country with WT race? No
Does he ride on a team that has same nationality as he has? No
Ever won a WT race? No
European? No
American (continent, North or South)? Yes
Asian? No
African? No
Oceanic? No, terrestrial
Yousef Mirza al-Hammadi? No

Rode Vuelta al Tachira this year? No We already knew that he is on a world team, so he couldn't be in a 2.2 race)
Raced in South America this year? Yes
Brandon Smith Rivera? No
Ever won a time trial? No*
 
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Male? Yes
Active? Yes
Name that starts with the letter 'T'? No
On WT team? Yes
Raced this year? Yes
More than two names? Yes
From country with GT? No
From country with Monument? No
Colombian? No
From country with WT race? No
Does he ride on a team that has same nationality as he has? No
Ever won a WT race? No
European? No
American (continent, North or South)? Yes
Asian? No
African? No
Oceanic? No, terrestrial
Yousef Mirza al-Hammadi? No
Rode Vuelta al Tachira this year? No
Raced in South America this year? Yes
Brandon Smith Rivera? No
Ever won a time trial? No*

Has ever won a pro race? Yes
Rode Gran Premio de la Patagonia? No (already established that he is on a WorldTeam, so not in a .2 race)
From Ecuador? No
 
...and Sepúlveda only has 2 names.
I wondered (and possibly gave a wrong answer) about that when I had Leonardo Duque as the mystery rider: would the absence of a second surname indicate unknown/unreported paternity, or why does it sometimes happen?

And what happened that Sebastián Henao Marín Gómez was originally reported with a different second surname when he first became well known. Doubts are sometimes cast about the father's identity, but not usually the mother's. Did they suddenly find out that his maternal grandfather was not the person they had thought for the previous 40 years or more?
 
In Argentina it is very common to drop the second surname and take just the paternal one, which is fairly unique among Latin American countries. Some keep the maternal family name and some don't.

Surname begins with a letter in the second half of the alphabet? Yes
More than 5 pro wins? Fewer than 5 in races of .1 and above
National flag has exactly three colours? Yes
 
I wondered (and possibly gave a wrong answer) about that when I had Leonardo Duque as the mystery rider: would the absence of a second surname indicate unknown/unreported paternity, or why does it sometimes happen?

And what happened that Sebastián Henao Marín Gómez was originally reported with a different second surname when he first became well known. Doubts are sometimes cast about the father's identity, but not usually the mother's. Did they suddenly find out that his maternal grandfather was not the person they had thought for the previous 40 years or more?

Maybe Argentina has different naming rules from other countries with heavy Spanish influence? My understanding is that if paternity is unknown in some of the Spanish influenced countries they double the maternal last name. I suspect that's why Uran is Riggoberto Uran Uran. Spain allows for that, Spain also allows that if you move to Spain and become a Spanish citizen and are from a country without double last names you can double your last name to fit their naming laws.
 
Maybe Argentina has different naming rules from other countries with heavy Spanish influence?
Many Argentinian names are Italian-derived, so I am almost surprised when I see the double surname custom in Argentinian names. But Duque's original nationality was Colombian.
My understanding is that if paternity is unknown in some of the Spanish influenced countries they double the maternal last name. I suspect that's why Uran is Riggoberto Uran Uran.
The story of Rigoberto Urán Senior's murder is often reported: this was not a case of unknown paternity.

But I have caused digression.
 
Many Argentinian names are Italian-derived, so I am almost surprised when I see the double surname custom in Argentinian names. But Duque's original nationality was Colombian.
The story of Rigoberto Urán Senior's murder is often reported: this was not a case of unknown paternity.

But I have caused digression.
I had not read about that, sorry. There must be another reason in his case.
 

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