Idiocy on Everest

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"So many dangerously unqualified idiots are climbing Mount Everest that Nepal Telcom is providing cell phone coverage for the mountain so they can dial 911 when their espresso machines break on the way to the summit."
 
On initial view I thought the photo looks ridiculous, but after a bit of investigation, it is understandable.

The window to summit is usually only one or two days each year. "ONE, maybe TWO DAYS" maybe a week apart when the weather opens up in late May.

The climbers are usually on the mountain for couple of months acclimatising going up and down between the camps. This is significant in itself.

So after couple of months on the mountain, there may be only one day when its possible to summit. Would you be prepared to say, I wait a few days, because there are two many climbers and hope maybe next week it will be clear again. This is why there is a big line plus a lot of Sherpas providing support.

Maybe the Govt should reduce the numbers, but that would affect employment.

It is a significant achievement and I dont begrudge anyone as you have to do the work.

I do hate the publicity records for being youngest/oldest/fattest to climb.

I agree, some are dragged up by Sherpas, but that's their choice.

Im going to base camp in a few weeks. Hopefully will make it, looking forward to it.

Regards


Hugh
 
May 14, 2010
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hughmoore said:
On initial view I thought the photo looks ridiculous, but after a bit of investigation, it is understandable.

The window to summit is usually only one or two days each year. "ONE, maybe TWO DAYS" maybe a week apart when the weather opens up in late May.

The climbers are usually on the mountain for couple of months acclimatising going up and down between the camps. This is significant in itself.

So after couple of months on the mountain, there may be only one day when its possible to summit. Would you be prepared to say, I wait a few days, because there are two many climbers and hope maybe next week it will be clear again. This is why there is a big line plus a lot of Sherpas providing support.

Maybe the Govt should reduce the numbers, but that would affect employment.

It is a significant achievement and I dont begrudge anyone as you have to do the work.

I do hate the publicity records for being youngest/oldest/fattest to climb.

I agree, some are dragged up by Sherpas, but that's their choice.

Im going to base camp in a few weeks. Hopefully will make it, looking forward to it.

Regards


Hugh
Hugh,

Base camp, from what I've heard, is no small achievement. Isn't it over 17,000 ft (5200+ meters)? Is base camp your destination, or are you actually going to try climbing this thing? Either way, can you send pictures? Or bring some back? Please!
 
Maxiton said:
Hugh,

Base camp, from what I've heard, is no small achievement. Isn't it over 17,000 ft (5200+ meters)? Is base camp your destination, or are you actually going to try climbing this thing? Either way, can you send pictures? Or bring some back? Please!
Im doing a tourist Trek to Base camp and Kala Patar (5500 metres). Looking forward to it.

Certainly a personal challenge for me, although others would say too many tourists. http://forum.cyclingnews.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

Hugh
 
hughmoore said:
The window to summit is usually only one or two days each year. "ONE, maybe TWO DAYS" maybe a week apart when the weather opens up in late May.
Not entirely true. If one's only goal is to get to the top, period, without having a great deal of skill or climbing knowledge, and taking as little risk as possible, then the window is almost that small. But even then it's rare to only find people summitting a few days a year.

The mountain can, and has been climbed in other seasons. Late October/early November has seen many ascents. The peak has been climbed in winter, and Reinhold Messner made a solo ascent during the monsoon season. He wrote an interesting book on it called Crystal Horizon.

Again, night and day the difference between what the people in that line of lemmings do, and someone like Messner or Andrzej Zawada.
 
Oct 1, 2010
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Maxiton said:
Hugh,

Base camp, from what I've heard, is no small achievement. Isn't it over 17,000 ft (5200+ meters)? Is base camp your destination, or are you actually going to try climbing this thing? Either way, can you send pictures? Or bring some back? Please!
Base camp from the Tibetan side is however a rather small achievement, despite the 5200 meters. Been there, done that. Driver took care of the hard work. :cool:
 
Hugh, you will have a fantastic time, no matter what other tourists are around!
The scenery is incredible on the way in, and be sure to spend time chatting with tea house owners and your local trekking staff as well...hang out with your kitchen staff and share some tea with them sitting in the cook tent!

I have led a group of Trekkers to the top of Kala Pattar and the views are spectacular! You will go through different zones of vegetation on up to glacial morain and windswept rock and ice....

Actual base camp is pretty bleak and not too pretty, a junky tent city, but ignore that and look at your views of the worlds tallest peaks close up!

If you acclimatize slowly and not try to walk too fast as you go up you will avoid altitude headaches and sickness. Drink tons of water and don't rush it...

Have a great trip!! Enjoy! you will have a wonderful experience and fall in love with the Nepali folks. :)

I have also been to everest bc on the Tibet side, LouieL, and spent a few days there...the drivers are totally awesome for sure.:)
 
LouieLouie said:
Base camp from the Tibetan side is however a rather small achievement, despite the 5200 meters. Been there, done that. Driver took care of the hard work. :cool:
One of my mates wants to ride from Lhasa from Katmandu next year which includes via base camp on the Tibet side.

The 100km downhill looks awesome.


Hugh

PS: Even though this would only be a small achievement, it will be fun for us.
 
May 14, 2010
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hughmoore said:
One of my mates wants to ride from Lhasa from Katmandu next year which includes via base camp on the Tibet side.

The 100km downhill looks awesome.


Hugh

PS: Even though this would only be a small achievement, it will be fun for us.
Are you allowed to enter Nepal now from China? When I was there it wasn't permitted.
 
May 7, 2009
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mewmewmew13 said:
..... Before my hubby would allow anyone to go he would do at least one or more climbs here in the States or similar ..
Mew,

What climbs in the states did he use to asses their (clients) capabilities ?

just curious, thanks.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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Sorry I can't recall the title, but I read a book last year that paints a far uglier picture of the situation on Everest. Prostitution and drug dealing are thriving at both Nepal and Chinese base camps. Some of the worst outfitters are showing up with nowhere near enough gear and mooching or stealing from the more established groups. Theft is also common in high altitude camps with oxygen, tents etc going missing. Stealing someone's oxygen at 28,000 feet is essentially attempted murder. 20th century climbing necessity- high altitude sherpas. 21st century climbing necessity- high altitude security guards.
 
Zam_Olyas said:
I have been on that flight. It's a crazy plane ride ... the landing and take off from Lukla are usually where the accidents happen. The runway is only a few hundres meters long on a downward slop that drops off a cliff! Planes then have to climb several hundred feet to fit through a gap between two mountains on the other side of the valley. You fly over the wreckage of a few planes that haven't made it as you take off!

It's something else.

So sad for folk on a trip of a lifetime to be involved in an accident like this.
 
Deagol said:
Mew,

What climbs in the states did he use to asses their (clients) capabilities ?

just curious, thanks.
Oh, sorry D, just saw this...
Well..I think they would do things in the Tetons..winter style..Rainier..maybe an Aconcagua or Denali trip.
My hubb always said climbing in Alaska was tougher than in the Himalayas..

When you climb in any tough conditions or challenging terrain you gat a good idea of how a person will do at altitude in the Himal...
Although fitness and experience at lower elevations is no guarantee of good performance at altitude. Some folks just never do well high up..their bodies that is.
:p
 
180mmCrank said:
I have been on that flight. It's a crazy plane ride ... the landing and take off from Lukla are usually where the accidents happen. The runway is only a few hundres meters long on a downward slop that drops off a cliff! Planes then have to climb several hundred feet to fit through a gap between two mountains on the other side of the valley. You fly over the wreckage of a few planes that haven't made it as you take off!

It's something else.

So sad for folk on a trip of a lifetime to be involved in an accident like this.
Yes, sadly it happens way too often. :(

What isn't said is that the Nepalese pilots are some of the best in the world. They can land almost anywhere...many times only a small hole opens in the clouds and they recognize a landmark and put it down.

The problem is lack of money for proper upkeep of planes, and of course the rapidly changing weather conditions...in a place where there is no room for error.
I've been on a few freaky flights and feel lucky I've made it through.
 
hughmoore said:
Im doing a tourist Trek to Base camp and Kala Patar (5500 metres). Looking forward to it.

Certainly a personal challenge for me, although others would say too many tourists. http://forum.cyclingnews.com/images/smilies/smile.gif

Hugh
My wife and I did that Treck to Kala Patar in 1999 ... it was easily the best trip we have ever done together. I know the route has become more and more commercialized (it was pretty commercial then) - but there is still a simplicity to walking among those magestic mountains that it's hard not to appreciate. I am confident that you will have a great time inspite of all the challenges described above.

Good luck. AND as has been said don't rush the altitude gains - even if you don't get sick it makes you feel like crap. THere are some great things to enjoy on the way ... no need to rush.

Have fun

T
 
Oct 25, 2010
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I guess Everest is the equivalent to climbers as the Tour De France is to riders...folks dream...imagine tho every rich masters fattie (tho even master fatties have more experience than these first time climbers) being able to buy a spot in the race...it would certainly happen if allowed...the difference being of course people wouldn't die but just fail...

you also get the feeling that the events of '96 drove more folks to want to climb it rather than the opposite...sadly, more death seems sometimes good for business...
 

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