Lesser Known Race Results 2020

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So Israel's both men and women road race champions have the same given name. Not a very common situation, I guess. :p
 
So Israel's both men and women road race champions have the same given name. Not a very common situation, I guess. :p
It would be a little funny if they were also a couple, but she is dating one of the Guys.
 
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So Israel's both men and women road race champions have the same given name. Not a very common situation, I guess. :p
And the U23 champ also has that name!
 
He's going to rest up to give the rest of the bunch a chance for the Clásico RCN, though, which started yesterday. Pretty much all the other major players are there - Óscar Sevilla, Fabio Duarte, Cristhian Montoya, Robinson Chalapud, Robigzon Oyola, Walter Pedraza, Bernardo Suaza, Aldemar Reyes, Juan Pablo Suárez, Diego Ochoa, Daniel Arroyave, Yecid Sierra (strangely listed as a Spaniard?), Darwin Atapuma, Hernán Aguirre, Miguel Ángel Rubiano, Nelson Soto, Danny Osorio, Didier Chaparro, Daniel Jaramillo, Jordán Parra, Jorge Camilo Castiblanco and Cayetano Sarmiento - and there are eight stages including an MTF (of sorts) at Riosucio, and a mini-stage which essentially consists of nothing but the brutal climb of the Alto de Minas and a short descent.

The race kicked off yesterday with a Team Time Trial which was won predictably by the Medellín superteam, today's stage began and finished in Ibagué with a "mountaintop finish" at Villa Restrepo on the outskirts of town, which only climbs 350m in 13km so really isn't something to get excited about (the same goes for the 'uphill' time trial on stage 5 or the Santa Rosa de Cabral stage on stage 4). Bernardo Suaza had a long solo attack which was caught early in the climb, before José Tito Rendón of the UAE Team countered and went solo 9km out. He lasted all the way into the final kilometre when he was pegged back by a reduced bunch having an uphill sprint like it was a HC MTF at the Tour de France or something. In the final kilometre, Edison Muñoz of the Indeportes Antioquia team (Orgullo Paísa, Camargo's team and also that of Jaramillo and Osorio) snuck away and out-thought the Medellín sprint train which was set up for Óscar Sevilla, holding on to win but crashing comically over the line (at low speed and still celebrating while prone on the floor). Sevilla is the new leader due to the superior TTT of Medellín.

Tomorrow, they go over the Alto de La Línea, but it's from the easier side and early in the day, with the stage being long and flattish after that to reach a finish in Buga.

Daily streaming with professional coverage, including helicams, on-screen graphics of distance, course and team jersey pictures, will be available here.

Stage 3 was dominated by the Colombia Tierra de Atletas team, who put four men in the front group that convened post-La Línea, and did a number on Medellín to take advantage of those numbers, with eventually Óscar Quiroz leading home a 1-2-3 for the team, as they had 3 in the final group of 5. Wilson Peña and the sprinter Nelson Soto were the other CTA riders in that group, with Óscar Sevilla and UAE's Rafael Pineda the interlopers. The victory means that CTA also wrest the leaders' jersey from their rivals, with Quiroz now leading by a single second from Óscar Sevilla.
 
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Entertaining finale in stage 4. The profile was rather misleading, suggesting an interminable low gradient ascent to the line, but in reality this was something of a misnomer; the finish was in fact crossing the viaduct into Dosquebradas, then up El Tambo, which is around 7km at 5% via the highway route (there is a steeper back roads way), cresting 2,8km from the line, a short descent and then a punchy 1km ascent to the line.

Strong breakaway, from which Robigzon Oyola (Medellín) and Wilson Cardona (Nectar Cundinamarca) escaped when the lead started to come down with 15km to go. They had around 2 minutes at the start of the climb, just under, but there were a lot of counterattacks behind. In the remains of the escape, which had been trimmed down to 4, a battle was on to survive, and eventually they caught the lead duo just before the summit, giving us six out front, with Medellín having two as well as Rafael Pineda from UAE being in the escape for the second day running. However, Oyola sprinted away for the mountains points, with Cardona going with him; thinking they were duking out the GPM the others let them go, and after Oyola took the summit, Cardona went over him and attacked again, the two creating a decisive gap of a few seconds. Oyola played it smarter, slowing the pace enough to make Cardona take it up in the final kilometre to prevent them being caught again, then outsprinting his breakmate to take the win. Pineda, who was just 28" down after yesterday's stage, takes the race leadership ahead of José Tito Hernández of Medellín and Didier Merchán of CTA; Pineda is arguably the leader of the young UAE team, but the others are very much secondary riders for teams which are so star-laden, so their role could be interesting in the days to come. It could well be that after the effort expended to get into the lead yesterday with Quiroz, CTA simply wanted to rest up for the ITT tomorrow and therefore were happy to let the break go, feeling they can handle anything Pineda has to offer on the Alto de Minas?
 
So Medellín took control of the race in the ITT; José Tito Hernández was strong enough to hold on to the GC lead by mere milliseconds from the evergreen Óscar Sevilla, Cara de Niño, who took the stage but fell just short of taking control of the race he has won 4 times in the last 12 years. It was a 1-2-3 for the team, with Duarte slotting in between the stage winner and the new yellow jersey. Merchán was at just 6" deficit, on the GC, with Pineda losing the lead due to his exploits in the breakaway two days running coming back to haunt him. Nevertheless, it's been a solid week's racing for the 21-year-old.

Today was a mountaintop finish at Riosucio, albeit not what you'd call an especially tough one - more a Montevergine type gradual incline up to a town on a ridge underneath the sierra leading into Medellín. The idea clearly was to set things up ahead of the short Minas stage tomorrow rather than light the touchpaper. The break was leading off well, and first Roosbelth (sic) Rojas of Team UAE Colombia and then Javier Jamaica escaped from the break to open up a gap. Jamaica rode past Rojas and hit for home, as Medellín were forced to pull rank around race leader José Tito Hernández as he suffered a bad patch, which allowed Didier Chaparro, at 2'14" on the GC, to escape and try to pull Jamaica back.

Chaparro had brought the gap down to less than 20" when it drew a reaction from the group behind which was trimmed to only around 10; Hernández had recovered and when the group caught Chaparro he counterattacked, grinding across the gap to the sole remaining fugitive. The summit of the climb proper came just under 2km to go, and he was still with Chaparro at this point; a straight fast descend into town followed, and then a final repecho. The lead the duo had was just a few seconds, but it was enough for Chaparro to ride up the final repecho in the lead to take the win as they held off the rest of the GC men by a few seconds. I believe this was probably a gift; at first when Hernández caught Jamaica, the latter was not collaborating as he obviously was more exhausted and wanted a chance to win the stage, but on the false flat through the town leading to that final ramp he was cooperating so there's a good chance a deal was struck for mutual benefit, Jamaica getting the stage and Hernández getting the GC time.

 
Medellín went bonkers on the mini-stage over the Alto de Minas. First, they set off with Cristhian Montoya in solo attack ahead of the bunch which was being paced by Medellín for leader José Tito Hernández. Then Robinson Chalapud set off in pursuit and caught his teammate, leaving the team with the yellow jersey with a Saunier Duval-esque break off the front. Wilson Cardona tried to push from the group of around 15 that was left behind, but he wasn't given any quarter by the remaining contenders, and instead some other counter attacks developed. Approaching the summit, Montoya proved stronger than his more experienced teammate and went solo again as they approached the summit, and went over the summit with about 27" advantage over Chalapud and the Grupo del Líder, which was led by Roosbelth Rojas. Chalapud then rejoined Montoya on the descent, but we got to see very little of it due to some issues of ad placement on such a short stage over a legendary climb, meaning almost three consecutive advert breaks - when we returned with 4km remaining, Montoya had disappeared and Chalapud was chasing Adrián Bustamante of the UAE Team Colombia who had attacked the yellow jersey group, caught the Medellín duo, and attacked them on the way into Caldas - the maillot líder had been slowing things to a crawl with two teammates up the road, and the advantage of Bustamante and Chalapud (who again caught up to the head of the race) suddenly swoll to over a minute; Chalapud paid for his efforts, however, and Bustamante, 14 years his junior, comfortably outsprinted him; Sevilla won the sprint of the group of 13 almost exactly a minute behind.

This set up a final day around the outlying towns and cities of the extended Medellín conurbation, with a misleading profile that belied the many cat.3 and uncategorised ascents in the late going. A 10-man group went up the road (including Salvador Moreno and Cristhian Montoya, most notably) and settled all of the intermediates, but was brought back, so Julián Cardona of the Colnago-CM team (which won the Riosucio stage with Javi Jamaica) went solo, only to be caught with just under 30km remaining when the last sequence of cat.3 climbs began. Those ones that looked like nothing on the profile, just some GPMs noted on a little downward roll. Some real candidates for the Worst of Race Profiles thread here. Montoya, yet again, was in the group that captured Cardona, along with Yecid Sierra, Diego Cano, Eli Saúl Burgos and Germán Gómez of UAE, and then a second group of five, driven by Moreno and Castiblanco, reunited the majority of the original break of the day. Castiblanco, Moreno, Gómez and Cano then broke away from that group, with Montoya and Gómez proving strongest, on the penultimate ascent of the day, before Montoya decided that after his solo exploit yesterday failed, then the one today should surely succeed. He quickly turned the race into what seemed to be a one-on-one time trial; his 31-year-old frame had a bit more durability than his 19-year-old adversary and the teenage Gómez took a few too many risks trying to catch Montoya on the final descent leading to a crash which resulted in his losing far too much time to have any chance of catching Montoya, so the latter led solo up the uncategorised cobbled climb into the finish in Concepción. From the GC group, Medellín carefully monitored to prevent any major attacks, allowing the finale to be settled by an uphill sprint on the cobbled climb which, for good measure, champion elect José Tito Hernández won in order to underscore his GC victory.

Final GC therefore looks like this:
1 José Tito Hernández Jaramillo (1994) Team Medellín 21:39:37
2 Óscar Sevilla Rivera (1976) Team Medellín +21
3 Didier Merchán Cardona (1999) Colombia Tierra de Atletas-GW +28
4 Rafael Steven Pineda Pineda (1999) UAE Team Colombia +1'02
5 Adrián Camilo Bustamante Ruda (1998) UAE Team Colombia +1'18
6 Fabio Andrés Duarte Arevalo (1986) Team Medellín +1'24
7 Brayan Stíven Sánchez Vergara (1994) Team Medellín +1'44
8 Didier Chaparro López (1987) IDEA-Indeportes Antioquia-Lotería de Medellín (Orgullo Paísa) +2'36
9 Javier Ernesto Jamaica Mejía (1996) Colnago CM Team +3'27
10 Juan Tito Rendón Franco (2000) UAE Team Colombia +3'51
 
Medellín went bonkers on the mini-stage over the Alto de Minas. First, they set off with Cristhian Montoya in solo attack ahead of the bunch which was being paced by Medellín for leader José Tito Hernández. Then Robinson Chalapud set off in pursuit and caught his teammate, leaving the team with the yellow jersey with a Saunier Duval-esque break off the front. Wilson Cardona tried to push from the group of around 15 that was left behind, but he wasn't given any quarter by the remaining contenders, and instead some other counter attacks developed. Approaching the summit, Montoya proved stronger than his more experienced teammate and went solo again as they approached the summit, and went over the summit with about 27" advantage over Chalapud and the Grupo del Líder, which was led by Roosbelth Rojas. Chalapud then rejoined Montoya on the descent, but we got to see very little of it due to some issues of ad placement on such a short stage over a legendary climb, meaning almost three consecutive advert breaks - when we returned with 4km remaining, Montoya had disappeared and Chalapud was chasing Adrián Bustamante of the UAE Team Colombia who had attacked the yellow jersey group, caught the Medellín duo, and attacked them on the way into Caldas - the maillot líder had been slowing things to a crawl with two teammates up the road, and the advantage of Bustamante and Chalapud (who again caught up to the head of the race) suddenly swoll to over a minute; Chalapud paid for his efforts, however, and Bustamante, 14 years his junior, comfortably outsprinted him; Sevilla won the sprint of the group of 13 almost exactly a minute behind.

This set up a final day around the outlying towns and cities of the extended Medellín conurbation, with a misleading profile that belied the many cat.3 and uncategorised ascents in the late going. A 10-man group went up the road (including Salvador Moreno and Cristhian Montoya, most notably) and settled all of the intermediates, but was brought back, so Julián Cardona of the Colnago-CM team (which won the Riosucio stage with Javi Jamaica) went solo, only to be caught with just under 30km remaining when the last sequence of cat.3 climbs began. Those ones that looked like nothing on the profile, just some GPMs noted on a little downward roll. Some real candidates for the Worst of Race Profiles thread here. Montoya, yet again, was in the group that captured Cardona, along with Yecid Sierra, Diego Cano, Eli Saúl Burgos and Germán Gómez of UAE, and then a second group of five, driven by Moreno and Castiblanco, reunited the majority of the original break of the day. Castiblanco, Moreno, Gómez and Cano then broke away from that group, with Montoya and Gómez proving strongest, on the penultimate ascent of the day, before Montoya decided that after his solo exploit yesterday failed, then the one today should surely succeed. He quickly turned the race into what seemed to be a one-on-one time trial; his 31-year-old frame had a bit more durability than his 19-year-old adversary and the teenage Gómez took a few too many risks trying to catch Montoya on the final descent leading to a crash which resulted in his losing far too much time to have any chance of catching Montoya, so the latter led solo up the uncategorised cobbled climb into the finish in Concepción. From the GC group, Medellín carefully monitored to prevent any major attacks, allowing the finale to be settled by an uphill sprint on the cobbled climb which, for good measure, champion elect José Tito Hernández won in order to underscore his GC victory.

Final GC therefore looks like this:
1 José Tito Hernández Jaramillo (1994) Team Medellín 21:39:37
2 Óscar Sevilla Rivera (1976) Team Medellín +21
3 Didier Merchán Cardona (1999) Colombia Tierra de Atletas-GW +28
4 Rafael Steven Pineda Pineda (1999) UAE Team Colombia +1'02
5 Adrián Camilo Bustamante Ruda (1998) UAE Team Colombia +1'18
6 Fabio Andrés Duarte Arevalo (1986) Team Medellín +1'24
7 Brayan Stíven Sánchez Vergara (1994) Team Medellín +1'44
8 Didier Chaparro López (1987) IDEA-Indeportes Antioquia-Lotería de Medellín (Orgullo Paísa) +2'36
9 Javier Ernesto Jamaica Mejía (1996) Colnago CM Team +3'27
10 Juan Tito Rendón Franco (2000) UAE Team Colombia +3'51
Cardona would have gotten away with it, too, if it hadn't been for those Medellín kids (and their grandfather).
 
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