Teams & Riders Nans is not the next Lance, but he has won stages in both the Giro and the Tour de France - The Nans Peters Thread

(He is the next Pierre Latour and the old Aurélien Paret-Peintre, who's the old Clément Champoussin, who's the old Matteo Jorgenson, who might be the old Damian Touzé)




Being a fan of biathlon I have liked this guy, ever since he won in Antholz/Anterselva last year. I was rooting for Chaves that day, but he just kept his advantage and even managed to increase the gap at the end.
In this year's Tour he gave Zakarin a masterclass in descending and conquered Peyresourde on his own.
He didn't have the same legs/luck in the Vuelta, but he came close on the stage, that Woods won. In between he worked hard for Alaphilippe in Imola.

He'll propably never be a GC contender, but that doesn't matter. When he's at his best, he's definitely not a man, you would like to be up against in a break. He can attack, he can climb, he can descend, and he can win in style.


Tour de Nans:
Born March 12 (Pisces) 1994 in Monestier-du-Percy/Grenoble/Isère
177 cm, 70 kg
Max HR: 182 bpm
HR rest: 36 bpm
VO2 max: 76 mL/(min·kg)

He's named after a French soap opera from the 70s about a sheperd from Provence, set in the 19th century, He doesn't think, he has the required mindset to breed animals himself though.
His paternal grandparents were Dutch.
He enjoys cross-country skiing and is good friends with Émilien Jacquelin, who won the pursuit title at the biathlon WC in Antholz/Anterselva back in february.
He has raced on four continents.
His older brother Leo got him interested in cycling. Leo. who never made it out of the U23 ranks, now works as a DS for Chambéry CF, a feeder team for AG2R, which Nans used to ride for.

He holds a bachelor's degree in materials science and engineering.
His nickname is Le Pingouin due to his strong eyebrow game and his movements on the bike.
He holds the record for most call-ups (22) to the French U23 national team.
His GT stage wins are his only pro wins to date. He was wearing number 6 on both occasions, but wore 5 and 8 during his two winless Vueltas.

He doesn't like the flats and needs a mountainous background to perfom.
He's under contract with AG2R until 2023.
Based on his PCS profile pics, he has found a haircut and a pose and decided to stick with them. He also seems to get happier every year: https://www.procyclingstats.com/rider/nans-peters/statistics/details
After doing some research it seems that AG2R generally just want their riders to replicate the same photos every year.
Sometimes the photographer forgets to say smile, other times they add a pair of glasses just for the lols.
 
Last edited:
Great opener!

One thing which bugs me about him which is really not his fault is the way Danish commentators pronounce his name as if it was English. Come on, the s's are clearly silent, and Peters should not all sound like the English Peter...

Also his tongue bugs me.
 
Reactions: Samu Cuenca
Great opener!

One thing which bugs me about him which is really not his fault is the way Danish commentators pronounce his name as if it was English. Come on, the s's are clearly silent, and Peters should not all sound like the English Peter...

Also his tongue bugs me.
I guess this is the correct pronounciation: https://forvo.com/word/nans_peters/
It's also the on used in this interview: https://www.francebleu.fr/sports/cyclisme/ce-serait-enorme-sur-la-vuelta-nans-peters-tentera-de-completer-sa-collection-d-etapes-1603120277
 
Reactions: Fus087
That is pretty much the pronunciation that I have in mind when I see the guy (luckily, I never have to say it out loud in the presence of anyone who might know better). I tend to stick with (a much simplified version of) the original language's rules for a name rather than those of the country his ancestors moved to: I don't think any of us try to apply Dutch phonetic rules to Tom Dumoulin, and I wince when I hear Dombrowski with a W sound, despite what Joe himself, and probably many generations before him, may say.

And yeah, I guess my anglicised Gaelic name does precisely what I have just denounced, but Mac Giolla Cionnaidh would be a step too far.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Okay, no silent s. French is a weird, illogical language.
Well, it's not a French name. It's a Dutch/Flemish name. He likely has Belgian or Dutch ancestors. But don't fret, the idiots at Belgian TV have made it our new national sport, to mispronounce names based on how the person in question, pronounces his/her own name. So if Peters can't pronounce his own name correctly, they'll just pronounce it the same way. Just like how Voeckler (a German name) was pronounced "Veclère" (as if it were a French name). Many TV's have perished in Belgium from people hurling stuff at the screen when another name got butchered.

Peters rhymes with haters.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
Well, it's not a French name. It's a Dutch/Flemish name. He likely has Belgian or Dutch ancestors. But don't fret, the idiots at Belgian TV have made it our new national sport, to mispronounce names based on how the person in question, pronounces his/her own name. So if Peters can't pronounce his own name correctly, they'll just pronounce it the same way. Just like how Voeckler (a German name) was pronounced "Veclère" (as if it were a French name). Many TV's have perished in Belgium from people hurling stuff at the screen when another name got butchered.

Peters rhymes with haters.
Do you pronounce Voeckler like a German name? I've never ever heard anyone do so in Belgium, so I doubt many are bugged about it.

And Peters in Dutch doesn't rhyme with haters, unless you pronounce it like the Dutch people do (pej-ters).
 
Do you pronounce Voeckler like a German name? I've never ever heard anyone do so in Belgium, so I doubt many are bugged about it.

And Peters in Dutch doesn't rhyme with haters, unless you pronounce it like the Dutch people do (pej-ters).
No, everybody pronounces Voeckler wrong, because the French do, and he's French. Doesn't mean it's correct. It's also just one example, same with Flemish names like Brys. They even admit it that they will pronounce the names the way the person in question does, regardless of it being correct or not. I'm waiting for a Belgian Athlete with a fat lip and a bad lisp make a mess of his name and see what they'll do.

And Peters, rhymes with haters. Yes. A Dutch name, pronounced like... Dutch people do :eek:

I always pronounce Voeckler German and feel bad about it (I pronounce him in my head, I don't have real life people to talk about cycling to).
This summer I forced myself to change from PEters to PeTERS. Nans I pronounce French, but it sounds like a funny, friendly name anyway to me.
Yes, fun times ahead with people all around the world hailing from foreign descent. Can you imagine Spanish commentators pronouncing a Spanish name like a Japanese person would, for a Japanese athlete from Spanish descent?
 
Last edited:
Reactions: BlueRoads
No, everybody pronounces Voeckler wrong, because the French do, and he's French. Doesn't mean it's correct. It's also just one example, same with Flemish names like Brys. They even admit it that they will pronounce the names the way the person in question does, regardless of it being correct or not. I'm waiting for a Belgian Athlete with a fat lip and a bad lisp make a mess of his name and see what they'll do.

And Peters, rhymes with haters. Yes. A Dutch name, pronounced like... Dutch people do :eek:
But if a family that was originally from one country moves to another country, isn't it only logical that after a few generations the pronunciation of the name change to reflect the language of the new country?
Take Matteo Jorgenson; his family was originally from Denmark, but his name isn't pronounced - or spelled - in the "correct" Danish way. Of course not; he's American. Likewise Nans Peters isn't going to pronounce his name in the Dutch way, because, well... he's French.
 
Reactions: Fus087
No, everybody pronounces Voeckler wrong, because the French do, and he's French. Doesn't mean it's correct. It's also just one example, same with Flemish names like Brys. They even admit it that they will pronounce the names the way the person in question does, regardless of it being correct or not. I'm waiting for a Belgian Athlete with a fat lip and a bad lisp make a mess of his name and see what they'll do.

And Peters, rhymes with haters. Yes. A Dutch name, pronounced like... Dutch people do :eek:


Yes, fun times ahead with people all around the world hailing from foreign descent. Can you imagine Spanish commentators pronouncing a Spanish name like a Japanese person would, for a Japanese athlete from Spanish descent?
Not saying it's correct, just that very few people seem to care.

Ehm, pronouncing Peters like the Dutch do, isn't correct either. You don't say 'zeuven' instead of 'zeven' now, do you? ;) so no, Peters doesn't rhyme with haters.
 
Wikipedia claims that the surname stems from his Dutch ancestry, but in this interview after his Giro win, he says that it's comes from his fathers family in Alsace. Both can of course be true, if they moved to Alsace from the Netherlands.

 
But if a family that was originally from one country moves to another country, isn't it only logical that after a few generations the pronunciation of the name change to reflect the language of the new country?
Take Matteo Jorgenson; his family was originally from Denmark, but his name isn't pronounced - or spelled - in the "correct" Danish way. Of course not; he's American. Likewise Nans Peters isn't going to pronounce his name in the Dutch way, because, well... he's French.
That makes no sense. Following that logic, there is no reason to ever try to pronounce a name correctly, just say it like you want it or how it would sound in your language, since the person who's name you're saying, doesn't try to pronounce his name in any other way than his language either even if that is not the origin of the name.

If you have a French name (like me), you try to pronounce it like you would in French, regardless whether you are actually from France or whether you actually speak French. What you are suggesting, is that when two British brothers migrate, and one goes to Japan, and the other goes to Italy, that if the grandchildren of both brothers would one day in the future meet (without knowing) and introduce themselves, that they would not even understand they share the same name and might be related. A name should be more than letters on a piece of paper.

Ehm, pronouncing Peters like the Dutch do, isn't correct either. You don't say 'zeuven' instead of 'zeven' now, do you? ;) so no, Peters doesn't rhyme with haters.
There is a difference between Dutch pronouncing "zeven" as "seujfeuh" and "Peters" as "Pejters". One is simply wrong and changes the actual vowel, the other is rounding off the vowel, which is even very common in Flanders. Take a professional radio voice like Peter Vandenbempt for instance, he will also say "Pejter" (as in "hater")
 
Last edited:
My 2 cents: I think people are entitled to choose how they want their names to be pronounced. If that means distorting the way the original name was pronounced then be it. The original name was very likely distorted a number of times before someone decided to write it down and make it the "official" version.
Exactly.
Besides, a name changing because the family - or part of the family - moves to another country just reflects the history of that family.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY