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Nathan Van Hooydonck (Jumbo Visma)

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He had a cardiac arrest but it was reactivated immeditely thanks to heartmassage and a defibrillator

two reasons for a reanimation : cardiac arrest or fibrillation...

medical tests will follow...
 
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This is probably the best outcome we could have hoped for. The only thing that remains, of course, is to find out what actually happened. Fainting doesn't immediately mean a heart attack.
"Doesn't suffer injuries from the car accident" is a bit beside the point. That accident was at low speed. The major issue here is the heart problem(s) that led to the accident and whether there is lasting heart damage or not.
 
At least he's better now:

View: https://twitter.com/JumboVismaRoad/status/1701901942153187828


But Jumbo's PR machine is total bilge. I wonder if Van Hooydonck would have been 'moved' had Sepp Kuss dedicated a red jersey to him?

Sorry for the cynicism but this sort of "person in hospital is happy so all good people should be as well" messaging is very heavy-handed.

Just my opinion but when something way more serious than bike racing happens, don't make it about... bike racing.
 
You'd say the chances of his returning to the sport are extremely slim, at least in the same capacity. There are cases like Christian Eriksen where a sportsman has had an incident like this and returned to the sport at a high level but those are the exception, not the norm. The fact this is an endurance sport means that you can't really enter it without significant strain on the heart either.

Not claiming that footballers don't have intensity in their efforts, but you can come on as a sub for 10-15 minutes in that and manage your workload a lot better than you can within a sport where you're completing a 4 hour stage day after day which will have an effect even if you're riding it within yourself.
 
I’m sure it depends on a lot of things between what the doctors recommend as well as his personal outlook and mentality. There’d probably be a part of me that’s worried about pushing the body too much because you just never know. But experiences like this can also remind one of how important the things you’re passionate about really are. Hopefully he can at least get back up and running with no issues first.
 
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You'd say the chances of his returning to the sport are extremely slim, at least in the same capacity. There are cases like Christian Eriksen where a sportsman has had an incident like this and returned to the sport at a high level but those are the exception, not the norm. The fact this is an endurance sport means that you can't really enter it without significant strain on the heart either.

Not claiming that footballers don't have intensity in their efforts, but you can come on as a sub for 10-15 minutes in that and manage your workload a lot better than you can within a sport where you're completing a 4 hour stage day after day which will have an effect even if you're riding it within yourself.
Well put. And on Eriksen's level you're performing in stadia surrounded by medics and defibrilators. Not surrounded by 100+ colleagues of the road where another episode can occur in a downhill or riding or your own with only the broom wagon in your arrears.

The recent history of his hopefully growing family another strong incentive to choose safely. Here's wishes for a normal and long retirement for Nathan.
 
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You'd say the chances of his returning to the sport are extremely slim, at least in the same capacity. There are cases like Christian Eriksen where a sportsman has had an incident like this and returned to the sport at a high level but those are the exception, not the norm. The fact this is an endurance sport means that you can't really enter it without significant strain on the heart either.

Not claiming that footballers don't have intensity in their efforts, but you can come on as a sub for 10-15 minutes in that and manage your workload a lot better than you can within a sport where you're completing a 4 hour stage day after day which will have an effect even if you're riding it within yourself.
There's different kinds of heart problems. If he had heart arrhythmia, in some cases that can be solved with an ablation, a relatively "small" surgical procedure. Robert Gesink had one, for example.

Christian Eriksen and Daley Blind have a pacemaker. I don't think there's any pro cyclists with a pacemaker. That would seem a little dangerous to me... but I'm not a heart surgeon.
 
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Eriksen I think has an implanted defibrillator rather than a pacemaker.

If they decide Nathan needs an ICD I don't think he'll return to cycling.

As someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest himself. I was shocked (as it were!) that Eriksen was able to resume high-level athletics. His doctors must have been convinced it was a one-time thing. Cardiac arrest can have many causes; some require relatively easy interventions but others are likely to repeat; hence need for ICD or a change in lifestyle.
 
If I'm not mistaken, I think part of the reason why Colbrelli had to retire and Eriksen did not was partially down to Italian laws preventing sportspeople from competing professionally with the specific type of implant they both have. Colbrelli could only compete under an Italian license and thus was prevented, Eriksen was not able to continue with Inter Milan and had his contract cancelled, but was able to continue in the UK as the implant is not banned there.

I'm not sure what the laws are like for Belgium that will affect Van Hooydonck, but the decision is probably more whether it's medically sensible to continue rather than legally possible at this stage.