NBA / NCAA Basketball

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I've been really impressed with the Celtics this year. They've managed to build up a strong squad, when many people might have thought the loss of Thomas and then Irving and Horford would cause problems, that has been able to cope with injuries. Big praise to Stevens. Coming in for Rivers and rebuilding that team so quickly was impressive. Hope we hang on to this group of players.
 
I've been really impressed with the Celtics this year. They've managed to build up a strong squad, when many people might have thought the loss of Thomas and then Irving and Horford would cause problems, that has been able to cope with injuries. Big praise to Stevens. Coming in for Rivers and rebuilding that team so quickly was impressive. Hope we hang on to this group of players.
Haven't watched much basketball of late but now the NFL is finished that will change. From what I have seen of the Celtics, I think it looks positive. The 76ers on the other hand don't look that good at all and many picked them to win the East. The Raptors also have done well without Kawhi. If I was a betting man I would say the 76ers won't make the conference final. Bucks versus ?
 
It’s pretty open. If the Celtics don’t have any injuries they can trouble anyone, Raptors and Heat look pretty good to and I wouldn’t say the Sixers or Pacers are out of it yet. Don’t think Brooklyn have a chance.

I’ll call it as Bucks/Celtics East and Clippers/Lakers West.
 
It’s pretty open. If the Celtics don’t have any injuries they can trouble anyone, Raptors and Heat look pretty good to and I wouldn’t say the Sixers or Pacers are out of it yet. Don’t think Brooklyn have a chance.

I’ll call it as Bucks/Celtics East and Clippers/Lakers West.
I think that will be close to the match ups unless the Bucks mess up. 76ers loss of Reddick and Jimmy was big and Embiid just isn't consistent enough.
 
Forgot to say, the Raptors are getting a roll on with Siakam returning, but they just lost Powell to a broken hand (I don't see him slamming many dunks so not sure how that happened). That's going to put a lot of pressure on Davis and maybe Thomas and McCaw.
 
Forgot to say, the Raptors are getting a roll on with Siakam returning, but they just lost Powell to a broken hand (I don't see him slamming many dunks so not sure how that happened). That's going to put a lot of pressure on Davis and maybe Thomas and McCaw.
Raptors have a good coach and a solid squad even without Kawhi. be interesting to see how Miami go. Don't see the Nets doing much. Pacers are doing well as are the Jazz. Houston are out of sorts.
 
Big trade and a lot to unpick here:


Firstly, I'm not sure what Houston get out of this unless it's just salary cut, possibly some better D? Losing Nene and Capela and bringing in Covington and Bell. Firstly, who's going to play at centre? Tucker..? I know they've been playing this agile, small man style but I wouldn't say it's working that well. Losing Capela's rebounds is going to hurt and who's going to pick up those lost points? Bell plays low minutes for not much gain, maybe he'll develop. On top of this they get a second round pick? There was talk of the Celtics giving up their Grizzlies pick (which is a potential lottery pick) to get Capela with maybe Theis or Kanter going with it. Both of those guys make more sense for Houston, with that first round pick being a massive plus, so I'm guessing it was just rumours (which I'm happy about, seemed a poor deal for Boston). I know this years draft doesn't look great, but that pick is something they could have traded for later on.

Hawks make out quite well in this. Capela and Nene over Drummond seems to fit well.

The Timberwolves pull in some potential and are loading up on picks. This season is done for them and while the draft class isn't seen as very promising, half a couple of high first round picks is going to do them well, either as trades or for taking what the draft has to offer. There's some reasonable guards in the class, I think they might be what Minnesota are after.

The Nuggets don't get much out of this. I'd guess they're planning something else or they were just clearing the decks.
 
Celtics continue to win, beating a losing Magic team, without Kemba. Being able to rest him agains tthe worse teams and still get goods wins bodes well. Good to Langford getting some long game minutes in, there was talk of trading him out already and hopefully this is an indication that's been put on the back burner. Tatum is on fire at the moment, Brown is showing why he was a potential all-star (call me biased but I think he should be in) and Hayward is still putting up good numbers.

After the Mookie/Price trade (seriously, what the hell was that?!) at least one of the teams I follow looks to be going to the play-offs in a good position.
 
The NCAA is currently considering releasing a bracket even though games won't be released. I hope they ultimately decide to do the brackets. If nothing else it would give us sports fans something to talk about for a little while.
 
I do not understand the current cancellation of the NBA season. It is favouring quantity of life over quality of life to a ridiculous degree. It's not like the season has just started; we are roughly 75% of the way through the season. Why not just ban the fans? And if players are testing positive, test their teammates and opponents, and get on with it.

If many people are already effected in America, then more people are going to catch the virus whether the NBA doesn't play games, or does. There are still mass gatherings even if you cancel entertainment....just try to walk into any supermarket.

And just remember that we are all going to die....eventually.
 
I do not understand the current cancellation of the NBA season. It is favouring quantity of life over quality of life to a ridiculous degree. It's not like the season has just started; we are roughly 75% of the way through the season. Why not just ban the fans? And if players are testing positive, test their teammates and opponents, and get on with it.

If many people are already effected in America, then more people are going to catch the virus whether the NBA doesn't play games, or does. There are still mass gatherings even if you cancel entertainment....just try to walk into any supermarket.

And just remember that we are all going to die....eventually.
The NBA is probably the most image conscious of the big three sports in the USA. The Australian basketball finals just had to play Game 3 to a near empty stadium of 200 family members and officials in a best of five series. Cinemas are still open but I doubt that many are going. Cafes, restaurants and pubs the same. A few cruise lines have postponed cruises for a few months at least.
 
The NBA has two players who tested positive. They had made a decision two weeks before the first positive that if a player tested positive they would have to suspend the season. They haven't actually cancelled it, just suspended and are hopeful to restart it.
 
I do not understand the current cancellation of the NBA season. It is favouring quantity of life over quality of life to a ridiculous degree. It's not like the season has just started; we are roughly 75% of the way through the season. Why not just ban the fans? And if players are testing positive, test their teammates and opponents, and get on with it.
People who criticize the NBA season cancelation seems to assume that the players can perform in a bubble, risking only themselves. Players go home to families; they and their family members have to go to supermarkets and other places where they interact with other people. Not to mention that players travel, often visiting several or more cities in several weeks. All this interaction is two-way. Not only do players risk spreading the virus beyond the NBA, but people outside the NBA can spread the virus to the players. The players then spread it among themselves, and back to outside the NBA. And remember, basketball is a very physical game. Players touch each other constantly, and pass a ball around. In theory, it's quite possible that everyone in a game could be infected beginning with one positive player, just through. the ball.

It looks as though many medical systems are being, or will be, overwhelmed, to the point where people who could have survived with proper treatment will be denied that treatment. This make it very clear that any steps that reduce or delay the spread could save lives.

If many people are already effected in America, then more people are going to catch the virus whether the NBA doesn't play games, or does. There are still mass gatherings even if you cancel entertainment....just try to walk into any supermarket.
Of course the spread will go on with or without the NBA' help. That doesn't mean stopping games can't help reduce the spread. It's a benefit-risk situation, I agree with that. But we don't even know what the full extent of the risk is. Suppose the NBA season continued, and a few players died--a small percentage of young people do from the virus--and other players suffered serious lung damage--some evidence suggests this may happen--compromising their ability to play even after recovering. Isn't missing part of one season a worthwhile price to pay to avoid that? Isn't that a quality of life issue, not simply a quantity of life issue?

And just remember that we are all going to die....eventually.
I could also point out that every season is going to end, eventually, too. If it doesn't matter when we die, why should it matter when a season ends?
 
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People who criticize the NBA season cancelation seems to assume that the players can perform in a bubble, risking only themselves. Players go home to families; they and their family members have to go to supermarkets and other places where they interact with other people. Not to mention that players travel, often visiting several or more cities in several weeks. All this interaction is two-way. Not only do players risk spreading the virus beyond the NBA, but people outside the NBA can spread the virus to the players. The players then spread it among themselves, and back to outside the NBA. And remember, basketball is a very physical game. Players touch each other constantly, and pass a ball around. In theory, it's quite possible that everyone in a game could be infected beginning with one positive player, just through. the ball.

It looks as though many medical systems are being, or will be, overwhelmed, to the point where people who could have survived with proper treatment will be denied that treatment. This make it very clear that any steps that reduce or delay the spread could save lives.



Of course the spread will go on with or without the NBA' help. That doesn't mean stopping games can't help reduce the spread. It's a benefit-risk situation, I agree with that. But we don't even know what the full extent of the risk is. Suppose the NBA season continued, and a few players died--a small percentage of young people do from the virus--and other players suffered serious lung damage--some evidence suggests this may happen--compromising their ability to play even after recovering. Isn't missing part of one season a worthwhile price to pay to avoid that? Isn't that a quality of life issue, not simply a quantity of life issue?



I could also point out that every season is going to end, eventually, too. If it doesn't matter when we die, why should it matter when a season ends?
Good points. Yes, it does matter when we die, of course it does. But life also is not simply about being born, and then continuing to breathe for as long as possible, and rating a successful life based solely on longevity. I think this is where a balance needs to be struck here.

I forget what I have already written in regards to this subject in this thread, but basically, if the human world all but stops for three months and as a result, gets on top of the virus. Then it will have been worth it. But otherwise, questions will be raised.

My frustration is more based on human hypocrisy, which is that generally speaking we - and the governments - don't give a f*** about people's health. Many things that we consume, and pastimes that we engage in lead to guaranteed deaths, either immediate (such as road fatalities), or less so (such as cigarette smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, generally bad diets) but that which still remove years from people's lives (which is actually what we are talking about here with CV). But we don't do everything in our power to improve the life longevity of humans when it comes to other factors, yet suddenly with CV everyone is a saint and has everyone else's well being at heart?

The big differences with CV are obviously the contagious factor, and the clogging up of hospital systems (the negative effects of cigarette smoking for example which may on average also mean that people die at 80 instead of 90, are more spaced out, so easier for the system to handle).
 
If you have not seen "The Last Dance" (ESPN 10-part documentary on the Michael Jordan Bulls team of the 90's), it is a great watch if you like that sort of thing. It began April 19, and I've seen the first 4 episodes. They billed it as a 10 part series, so I hope there's more to come.
 
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