Proof of government doping program in Russia

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sniper said:
indeed.
let's get back to your previous point.
the study (at least that photo that we're seeing) is written in perfect english, and speaks about "the Russian athletes" rather than about "our athletes" or "in our country" or something.
Iow, this is clearly not an old Soviet report.
Correct. Its just the usual stuff you get from the West about dodgy Eastern Europeans. Pointless.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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thehog said:
The US were blood doping in '84. Back then it was legal
Hmmm. I'm not sure that not being illegal is the same as being "legal."

"Legal" might suggest that it was allowed, but clearly it wasn't "approved" (except by the American coaching/medical staff).
 
Granville57 said:
Hmmm. I'm not sure that not being illegal is the same as being "legal."

"Legal" might suggest that it was allowed. Rather, it just hadn't been made illegal yet.
Wasn't that it "allowed" it was that anti-doping authorities had no idea that it existed. Or more to the point you weren't actually putting anything foreign or a chemical into your body.

Mearly freezing ones blood and re-injecting.

Lasse Viren wasn't doing it in the 70s and openly talking about it.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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thehog said:
Wasn't that it "allowed" it was that anti-doping authorities had no idea that it existed.
Which is not the same as being "legal."

But I think we are in agreement on the subtext of all this. :)
 
Granville57 said:
Which is not the same as being "legal."

But I think we are in agreement on the subtext of all this. :)
Agreed.

I should state Viren didn't talk about it, my mistake. Although his teammates did confess.

This is a news clipping from 1976, hemoglobin injections! Cool! :cool:

 
Aug 15, 2012
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thehog said:
Agreed.

I should state Viren didn't talk about it, my mistake. Although his teammates did confess.

This is a news clipping from 1976, hemoglobin injections!

Well, at least we can feel good that the "look him in the eye" litmus test of being clean isn't exactly new. :rolleyes: Interesting article though.
 
neineinei said:
It's from Volkov N.I.: Bioenergetics of Sports Activities. Moscow, TPFKS, 2010

https://twitter.com/iljukov/status/546917698291380225
I don't doubt it. The point being blood transfusions have been around since the beginning of time. And all nations have been at it. Tyler's book glorified them to the point of en vogue but they are nothing new. The Russians were probably the first to use them in sport but they have been a part of medical procedure since the 30's*.






* I'm not a doctor but have seen the beauty of a transfusion in cancer treatment.
 
DirtyWorks said:
Arne Ljungqvist gets a good Reuters story. It's exactly what WADA's message should be. It will be interesting to see if the story is published widely.

http://www.firstpost.com/sports/doping-cover-ups-result-death-elite-sports-wada-vice-chairman-1859193.html

Has Reedie said anything like this? Not to my knowledge. :(
A good line, except the Russian whistleblower has yet to be contacted by WADA for their investigation.

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http://www.faz.net/aktuell/sport/sportpolitik/doping/julia-stepanowa-im-interview-ueber-russlands-doping-skandal-13325469.html?printPagedArticle=true#pageIndex_2&edit-text=&act=url


Did you achieve your goal?

The most important thing was to attract attention with the documentation. We hope that now someone from the IAAF or the Wada report to us in order to view the entire material. So far that has not yet happened.

Both organizations say they have found.

We sometimes joke about it. What they determine only? Us no one has yet asked to provide them with recordings. What would we do without saying.
Google translate really butchers it, but so far, WADA (and IAAF) have not come to the whistleblowers looking for the evidence...
 
More Strides than Rides said:
A good line, except the Russian whistleblower has yet to be contacted by WADA for their investigation.

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http://www.faz.net/aktuell/sport/sportpolitik/doping/julia-stepanowa-im-interview-ueber-russlands-doping-skandal-13325469.html?printPagedArticle=true#pageIndex_2&edit-text=&act=url


Google translate really butchers it, but so far, WADA (and IAAF) have not come to the whistleblowers looking for the evidence...
There is an actual English translation up thread.

Here on Let's Run: http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=6189827

Did you achieve your goal?"

The most important thing was to attract attention with the documentation. We hope that now someone from the IAAF or the Wada will contact us in order to view the entire material. So far that has not yet happened.

"Both organizations say they're investigating."

We sometimes joke about it. Which investigations? Until now no one has asked us to provide our recordings. What we would do without saying.

"How did you master the coolness filming coaches, doctors and athletes, while they practised doping?"

I was not cold-blooded. Every time I recorded something with my phone, I was nervous. Especially when people looked at the phone, I worried every time about them getting suspicious. That would have brought us into great trouble in Russia. I'm not a cheater. I've made mistakes, but for a good future I have to make sacrifices. This was one. I have learned to act like James Bond.

"Are you in danger?"

We left Russia. Today we feel safe. What is in the future, I don't know. No one knows the consequences of this story. If more athletes turn against the fraud scheme, the situation could get out of control there.

"Did you have support while you were in Russia?"

The greatest support was that the Wada believed us and that Hajo Seppelt of the German television believed us. We knew what we did this for.

"If the doping system is a hierarchy: how far up does it reach?"

It is obvious that it is the goal of a country to win as many medals as possible at World Championships and Olympic Games. The goal of our state is to prove that Russia is greater and better than any other country in the world. In every field. The President, the Ministry, the Anti-Doping Agency: all know that the ultimate goal is to win medals. If you see the results of the Olympic Games in London and the World Athletics Championships in Moscow ...

"... Number two in athletics with eight Olympic victories and number one in Moscow with seven gold medals ..."

... Then you know that the system works. If it is successful, why should they change it?

"If the President of the IAAF asked for advice: How should he deal with the Russian athletics?"

Officials supporting doping instead of fighting it should be kicked out. Since most of the coaches come from the Soviet Union, it might be impossible to change their views. If one is really aiming at combatting doping, one has to ban officials and coaches not for two or four years, but for life. The Ministry should employ young coaches from abroad and give them time to build a system that works without doping. The entire association should be excluded for two years from all international competitions.

"Do you have an explanation, why now that you have fulfilled your mission and brought evidence Wada does nothing?"

The Wada is a toothless tiger.
 
thehog said:
There is an actual English translation up thread.

Here on Let's Run: http://www.letsrun.com/forum/flat_read.php?thread=6189827
The most important thing was to attract attention with the documentation. We hope that now someone from the IAAF or the Wada will contact us in order to view the entire material. So far that has not yet happened.

Yet, she was bribing IAAF officials. She doesn't understand how the system works.

WADA has no authority to do anything without the IAAF's instructions.
 
The tasks of sports and ethical education in the Soviet
sports school consist in the setting down of ethical norms
which are formed by the entire system of education in
Soviet society. Therefore, basically these tasks are not
something different in principle from the general tasks of
moral education but are in fact some of their practical
aspects. In other words, the main thing in sporting and
ethical education is to make the general principles of the
moral behaviour a practical guidance to action in the field
of sport.

The norms of the sports ethics theoretically are grasped
easily because generally they boil down to the requirement
to behave in sports as it befits a man: to honestly observe
the established rules of the competitions, not to resort to
prohibited methods of achieving superiority over an opponent,
the avoidance of rudeness, etc.

excerpt from: Fundamentals of Sports Training by L. Matveyev
translated from the Russian by Albert P. Zdornykh
1981 Progress Publishers (17, Zubovsky Boulevard, Moscow)
 
Oct 16, 2010
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DirtyWorks said:
The most important thing was to attract attention with the documentation. We hope that now someone from the IAAF or the Wada will contact us in order to view the entire material. So far that has not yet happened.

Yet, she was bribing IAAF officials. She doesn't understand how the system works.

WADA has no authority to do anything without the IAAF's instructions.
still, in a parallel universe where WADA are run by incorruptable and honest human beings, somebody from WADA would have contacted them already, if only to explain said system to them.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Freddythefrog said:
Did the IAAF tweet happy birthday to Caster Semenya ?
p'raps they wished chelsea manning a happy thanksgiving tho ;)

brother or sister of paul manning, whichever way you like to cut it
 
Jul 11, 2013
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http://hosted2.ap.org/ORBEN/a83f53f64d8747e1ba7ef3607401e6a5/Article_2015-02-02-ATH--Russia-Doping/id-692501c49f7e4c38ab482a3fb46ee7a7#.VM-OpJ2G_ow

All good then.....

IAAF: Russian bans show 'robustness' of anti-doping program

MONACO (AP) ? The IAAF says the spate of doping bans among top Russian athletes shows the "robustness" of the sport's drug-testing program.

So far this year, bans have been handed to seven Russian track-and-field medalists from major championships, including four Olympic champions.

Suspensions were imposed Friday on Olympic 3,000-metrer steeplechase champion Yulia Zaripova and former heptathlon world champion Tatyana Chernova.

The International Association of Athletics Federations says in a statement Monday the two cases are "the latest illustration of the robustness of the IAAF anti-doping program."

The IAAF says more than 40 "elite athletes" have been sanctioned based on abnormal biological passport profiles. The program, started in 2009, tracks an athlete's blood parameters for signs of doping.

Zaripova was among those sanctioned for a biological passport violation. Chernova was caught in a retesting of drug samples from the 2009 world championships.
 
May 19, 2010
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mrhender said:
These bans are nothing but mockery. The Russians have taken more than two years to process the most of them, and they hand out reduced sanctions. They also pick among the results to disqualify, some of them were dirty in the run ups for the Olympics, clean for the games, and then dirty again some months later. So they get to keep the Olympic medal, if the RUSADA sanctions stands.

Take for instance Sergey Kirdyapkin, 2012 Olympic 50 km race walk champion. According to RUSADA there is bio passport evidence that he was blood doping from 17 December 2011 to 11 June 2012 but he is clean for the London games in July/August and keeps the gold. And he gets a 3 year and 2 month sanction, so he is free to compete again in time for the Rio games.

To top it he has been competing while provisionally suspended (there are pictures of him taking part in a competition in Saransk in December 2014) and right after the official ban he went on a training camp with other race walkers from the same doping hell hole in Saransk, and had his pictures taken and uploaded on the net. They don't give a damn, and IAAF says God bless.
 
neineinei said:
These bans are nothing but mockery. The Russians have taken more than two years to process the most of them, and they hand out reduced sanctions. They also pick among the results to disqualify, some of them were dirty in the run ups for the Olympics, clean for the games, and then dirty again some months later. So they get to keep the Olympic medal, if the RUSADA sanctions stands.

Take for instance Sergey Kirdyapkin, 2012 Olympic 50 km race walk champion. According to RUSADA there is bio passport evidence that he was blood doping from 17 December 2011 to 11 June 2012 but he is clean for the London games in July/August and keeps the gold. And he gets a 3 year and 2 month sanction, so he is free to compete again in time for the Rio games.

To top it he has been competing while provisionally suspended (there are pictures of him taking part in a competition in Saransk in December 2014) and right after the official ban he went on a training camp with other race walkers from the same doping hell hole in Saransk, and had his pictures taken and uploaded on the net. They don't give a damn, and IAAF says God bless.
The IAAF clearly has a price at which they can be bought.

I have to give the UCI some credit because it's not at all obvious what the price is to, say, win the Vuelta and for some reason suddenly pursue the Kazhaks.
 
neineinei said:
These bans are nothing but mockery. The Russians have taken more than two years to process the most of them, and they hand out reduced sanctions. They also pick among the results to disqualify, some of them were dirty in the run ups for the Olympics, clean for the games, and then dirty again some months later. So they get to keep the Olympic medal, if the RUSADA sanctions stands.

Take for instance Sergey Kirdyapkin, 2012 Olympic 50 km race walk champion. According to RUSADA there is bio passport evidence that he was blood doping from 17 December 2011 to 11 June 2012 but he is clean for the London games in July/August and keeps the gold. And he gets a 3 year and 2 month sanction, so he is free to compete again in time for the Rio games.

To top it he has been competing while provisionally suspended (there are pictures of him taking part in a competition in Saransk in December 2014) and right after the official ban he went on a training camp with other race walkers from the same doping hell hole in Saransk, and had his pictures taken and uploaded on the net. They don't give a damn, and IAAF says God bless.
Grow up. Doping goes on in every country. Top athletes are always gonna be protected. Look at your own country for examples.
 
May 19, 2010
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Let's take Tatyana Chernova. In 2013 IAAF retested samples from the 2009 Worlds and found that one of hers was positive for Oral Turinabol.

Another athlete found positive after the retests is the Moldovian hammer thower Zalina Marghieva. Marghieva had her ban announced in 2013, 2 years ineligibility and loss of all results from the date of the positive test till the start of the period of ineligibility, 4 years.

Chernova gets her ban announced in January 2015. 2 years ineligibility from 22 July 2013, but she only loses the results from 15 August 2009 - 14 August 2011, 2 years. This means that she gets to keep the 2011 World Championships gold and 2012 Olympic bronze. If she'd been Moldovian she'd lost those medals two years ago.
 
May 19, 2010
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Russian child athletes are doping at school, says sports minister

Russian child athletes are taking banned substances while still at school, the country?s sports minister Vitaly Mutko has claimed.

With Russia enduring doping scandals for months, Mutko vowed to crack down on doping among child athletes, which he suggested was the result of a system where youth coaches can be paid sizeable bonuses when young athletes win competitions.

A holdover from the Soviet era, Russia has hundreds of children?s sports academies spanning dozens of summer and Winter Olympic sports.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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veganrob said:
They have to keep up with the kids here in the US.
It's heartwarming to see certain East German traditions being fostered and nursed in other parts of the world.
 
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