Race Design Thread

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Two parallel Giri... this could get confusing since you're posting at a faster rate than me! Probably ok while we're at opposite ends of the country, but I'm sure we'll meet at some point.

Stage 9: San Donà di Piave - Trieste, 166km





Climbs:
Conconello-Monte Belvedere (cat.3) 4,1km @ 10,3%
Conconello-Monte Belvedere (cat.3) 4,1km @ 10,3%

After the rest day the riders have transferred up into the north of the country for a stage which shows us what the final stage of the 2014 Giro COULD have been but isn't. It's one of those typical Giro stages that look fairly easy on first glance but are secretly far trickier than you might have expected.

After the transfer the riders will be happy enough on their first day after the rest day to enjoy a mostly flat stage heading into the very corner of the country, on the Slovenian border. Trieste has of course much history in the Giro, with the notorious partly-neutralised 1946 stage "won" by Giordano Cottur perhaps the most memorable, and it will be hosting the conclusion of next year's race. Here, however, it's part of a mid-race intermediate stage, which consists of an almost entirely pan-flat first 115km following the Adriatic coast through Veneto and Friuli, then two laps of a difficult circuit around Trieste.

The main reason for the difficulty is the very steep climb of Conconello, the very steep (maximum of 23%) Hausberg of Trieste, a long rectangular mountain ridge overlooking the city with dramatic views of the bay below. At the base of the climb it's unassuming enough, as Via Commerciale is wide enough and the first kilometre averages around 6%, but then it kicks right up with the second kilometre averaging 12,2% and including that maximal 23%. About 500m at 7% then follow before we turn right onto the road Salita a Conconello, which runs parallel to the trenovia at around 12%, before crossing the main road onto Via della Bellavista. This is where things get really, really tough as the final kilometre of the climb opens up with 200m at 20% and averages an Alto de Aia-tastic 14%. Just to add insult to injury, there's a stretch from 500m to the summit to 200m to the summit which averages 13% and is on cobbles. After cresting the summit, however, there's no real descent per se, more a few kilometres of flat before a gradual, two-stepped rolling downhill to the finish. The second time the riders climb Conconello, the summit is crested with 19,3km remaining, but with the difficulty of the climb it is almost certain that there would be some action among the elites here on the day after a rest. The climb is somewhere between Bologna-San Luca and Xorret del Catí, but with the descent finish there's no Unipublic styled all-in-the-last-3km stage here.

San Donà di Piave:


Trieste:
 
Giro d'Italia

Stage 5: Reggio Calabria - Soverato, 165 km






Still a long way to go until i am in northern Italy. There will be two stages in Friuli, though. Stage 5 follows the Ionian coast to the east and is totally flat. There is some chance of wind, but normally this should be another sprint.

Reggio Calabria:


Soverato:
 
Giro d'Italia

Stage 6: Catanzaro Lido - San Giovanni in Fiore, 221 km






The first 21 km are not shown above. They are flat along the coast. Then the road turns inland and climbs from sea level to 1.600 m. The first 25 km of this climb have 5 to 6%, then it flattens out a bit. This should be the place where a break forms, while non-climbers will try not to get dropped from the peloton. The riders have now reached the plateau of La Sila and will stay there for the rest of the stage. The terrain is rolling with some climbs thrown in. The next substantial one is Botte Donato (10,4 km 5,3%), which probably is the highest pass in the region at 1.866 m. Much harder is the short climb that waits at km 147. Colle Esca, also called Macrocioli, is a legbreaking wall at 4,6 km length and average gradient of 11,8%. There are several stretches at 19%. This is followed by more rolling terrain. A critical moment occures at 18 km to go, where the riders leave the main road and turn into a small road for a steep and tricky descent at 12%. This is followed directly by a steep ascent (3,4 km 10,4%) to the village of Castelsilano. There are 10 km to go at the top of the climb, the first 8 km are rolling, the last 2 km are uphill again (at 5%), already in the city of San Giovanni in Fiore. This is a hard day in the saddle in the mountains of Calabria. I expect quite a lot of action in the last 15 km, not quite sure what to expect from Colle Esca.

Catanzaro Lido:


San Giovanni in Fiore:
 
Giro d'Italia

Stage 7: Cosenza - Lido di Tortora, 164 km






From Cosenza the course follows the river Crati. There are two hills in the first 55 km, the second one leading to Spezzano Albanese. The coastal ridge is crossed at the relatively easy Passo dello Scalone (740m), after which 25 km of flat along the Tyrrhenian coast follow. Then things are getting interesting, as a few capi have to be navigated, which unsurprisingly provides nice views and results in three little climbs that have to be tackled. The first one is shallow (4 km 3,5%), the second one has 1,25 km at 5,2%, the last one 0,6 km at 6,3%. There are 7 km left to go at the top of the last capo. The descent leads into Praia a Mare, the finishing straight is 4 km long. This should provide about equal chances for attackers and sprinters, i would say.

Cosenza:


Lido di Tortora:
 
Giro d'Italia

Stage 8: Salerno - Vico Equense, 118 km





Before this stage, a transfer of about 170 km is needed. But most of it is on autostrada, so it shouldn't be a problem. The stage is very short, too, so the riders can sleep a bit longer than usual. Well, the stage is short, but very intense. It starts with smaller climbs in the vicinity of Salerno, then turns on the wonderful Costiera Amalfitana, before climbing Valico di Chiunzi (11,6 km 5,5%). This is followed by a nasty little climb on a small road (note Vesuvio in the background) to Lettere (2,45 km 12%). The descent is on a wider road and not as steep. This brings us to the main and final climb, the legendary Monte Faito (13,8 km 7%), famous for the exploits of Jose Manuel Fuente in his battle with Merckx in the Giro 1974. Monte Faito is an endless succession of hairpins and the first major climb of this Giro. The descent is highly technical, descending skills are definitely important today.

Salerno:


Vico Equense:
 
Giro d'Italia

Stage 9: Bacoli - Napoli, 43 km ITT





The main time trial of this Giro. Shortly after the start Monte Procida has to be climbed, that's 1,8 km at 6,5%. Then the route runs along the shores of Golfo di Pozzuoli and Golfo di Napoli and is mostly flat, except for a 1,3 km climb mid-stage. The final kms take place in Napoli. It's Sunday, so there should be big crowds. The riders enter the city center via the Via Francesco Carraciolo, which has to be one of the most beautiful streets in Europe. Then there is a little climb to Corso Vittorio Emanuele. The Corso is like a balcony midtown; to the left nice houses, to the right the lower parts of Napoli and the sea. After this the riders descend again to the harbour, cross the Piazza del Plebiscito and ride through the historic centre of the town on the 1,2 km long and cobbled Via Toledo. The final 6 km are mostly uphill; some of that is on cobbles as well. The climb really starts at the Via Matteo Renato Imbriani, the cobbled part is the Via Giacinto Gigante. The final km is flat, the finish is at the Piazza degli Artisti.

This is followed by a rest day on Monday, which includes a transfer to Pescara.

Bacoli:


Napoli:
 
Aug 31, 2012
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THE STAGE OF MY CITY, do you like it? (take a look at it)

I live in Gijón, it's a lovely city in the north of Spain it has many possibilities to create a really hard and beautiful race if someone wanted. Take a look at it.


Climbs (name: distance – medium percentage – maximun percentage):
1.El Muselín: 840 m – 10,7% – 24%
2.Monte Areo: 2400 m – 5,9% – 14%
3.La Formiga: 650 m – 8,7% – 11%
4.Luanco: 950 m – 8,5% – 16%
5.El Monte: 1200 m – 6,8% – 11%
6.Cabo de Peñas: 800 m – 5% – 8%
7.La Granda: 1450 m – 4,5% – 8%
8.El Campo: 1600 m – 4,6% – 13%
9.Piedramenuda: 850 m – 8,7% – 13%
10.La Eria: 1900 m – 4,8% – 8%
11.Zanzabornín: 600 m – 8,3% – 12%
12.El Llano: 650m – 7,7% – 15%
13.L’Alto la Iglesia: 660 m – 8,3% – 10%
14.Xabina: 620 m – 10% – 17%
15.El Palacio: 1150 m – 6,1% – 11%
16.El Fundial: 500 m- 10,2% – 11%
17.Villar de Riba: 2150 m – 5,2% – 13%
18.Montegrande: 530 m – 9,4% – 15%
19.Retuerto: 2000 m – 6,5% – 15%
20.Monteagudo: 1600 m – 7,1% – 14%
21.Santueña: 1500 m – 9,1% – 17%
22.Gallinal: 1900 m – 6,2% – 15%
23.La Teyera: 850 m – 7,4% – 17%
24.La Coroña: 1850 m – 6,3% – 9%
25.Cementerio de Cenero: 1300 m – 5,4% – 8%
26.Los Llanos: 2500 m – 8,1% – 18%
27.Pico Mil Cuatrovientos: 3000 m – 8,2% – 16%
28.San Martín de Huerces: 1150 m – 5,5% – 13%
29.Lavandera: 1600 m – 8,1% – 15%
30.La Cuadra: 1300 m – 7,8% – 12%
31.Caldones: 1300 m – 7,5% – 13%
32.Túnel de Infanzón: 800 m – 9% – 14%
33.Ñora: 1100 m – 7,8% – 15%
34.Alto de Somió: 770 m – 7% – 10%
35.La Providencia: 470 m – 8,2% – 11%
36.Cerro de Santa Catalina: 410 m – 5,3% – 14%

You can watch photos of the route here where it says "Imagenes del recorrido":

http://plataformarecorridosciclistas.org/2013/09/16/la-clasicona-gran-premio-ciudad-de-gijon/
 
Jun 28, 2012
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Asturiano said:
I live in Gijón, it's a lovely city in the north of Spain it has many possibilities to create a really hard and beautiful race if someone wanted. Take a look at it.


Climbs (name: distance – medium percentage – maximun percentage):
1.El Muselín: 840 m – 10,7% – 24%
2.Monte Areo: 2400 m – 5,9% – 14%
3.La Formiga: 650 m – 8,7% – 11%
4.Luanco: 950 m – 8,5% – 16%
5.El Monte: 1200 m – 6,8% – 11%
6.Cabo de Peñas: 800 m – 5% – 8%
7.La Granda: 1450 m – 4,5% – 8%
8.El Campo: 1600 m – 4,6% – 13%
9.Piedramenuda: 850 m – 8,7% – 13%
10.La Eria: 1900 m – 4,8% – 8%
11.Zanzabornín: 600 m – 8,3% – 12%
12.El Llano: 650m – 7,7% – 15%
13.L’Alto la Iglesia: 660 m – 8,3% – 10%
14.Xabina: 620 m – 10% – 17%
15.El Palacio: 1150 m – 6,1% – 11%
16.El Fundial: 500 m- 10,2% – 11%
17.Villar de Riba: 2150 m – 5,2% – 13%
18.Montegrande: 530 m – 9,4% – 15%
19.Retuerto: 2000 m – 6,5% – 15%
20.Monteagudo: 1600 m – 7,1% – 14%
21.Santueña: 1500 m – 9,1% – 17%
22.Gallinal: 1900 m – 6,2% – 15%
23.La Teyera: 850 m – 7,4% – 17%
24.La Coroña: 1850 m – 6,3% – 9%
25.Cementerio de Cenero: 1300 m – 5,4% – 8%
26.Los Llanos: 2500 m – 8,1% – 18%
27.Pico Mil Cuatrovientos: 3000 m – 8,2% – 16%
28.San Martín de Huerces: 1150 m – 5,5% – 13%
29.Lavandera: 1600 m – 8,1% – 15%
30.La Cuadra: 1300 m – 7,8% – 12%
31.Caldones: 1300 m – 7,5% – 13%
32.Túnel de Infanzón: 800 m – 9% – 14%
33.Ñora: 1100 m – 7,8% – 15%
34.Alto de Somió: 770 m – 7% – 10%
35.La Providencia: 470 m – 8,2% – 11%
36.Cerro de Santa Catalina: 410 m – 5,3% – 14%

You can watch photos of the route here where it says "Imagenes del recorrido":

http://plataformarecorridosciclistas.org/2013/09/16/la-clasicona-gran-premio-ciudad-de-gijon/
Looks like an Amstel Gold Race on steroids!
 
Dec 16, 2011
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Somewhere around August I was playing a bit on tracks4bikers. I do this many times, but most times I end up with pretty uninteresting races. However, this time I created something nice. I decided: 'I should post this one in the Race Design Thread'.

We're a few months later now, and I haven't posted anything yet. First, I was too busy; later on I just forgot about it. But today I finally decided to show my race: a Tour de France without the Alps and Pyrenees

Prologue: Brest (5.5 KM)

It's not very original, but this Tour starts with a prologue. The course is flat and pretty straightforward. Still, it's a nice way to show all the riders.

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Tour de france without Alps and Pyrenees

Stage 1: Brest - Mur de Bretagne (164 KM)

Today's stage brings the peloton into the heart of Brittany. The finish is on top of the Mur de Bretagne. Just for your information; the last time the Tour finished there Cadel Evans narrowly defeated Alberto Contador. So this is no easy climb!

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Tour de france without Alps and Pyrenees

Stage 2: Auray - le Mont saint Michel (188 KM)

Today's stage will most likely end up in the first bunch sprint of this Tour. The finish is in front of the beautiful Mont saint Michel monastery.

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Tour de france without Alps and Pyrenees

Stage 3: Vire - Rouen (194 KM)

Again a flat stage. The sprinters get a chance for a royal sprint, since the last kilometres are completely without turns.

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Tour de france without Alps and Pyrenees

Stage 4: Forges les Eaux - Laon (195 KM)

The fourth stage brings the peloton into the rural areao of Northern France. The first part of the stage is rather straightforward. Towards the finish the route will become hillier. The action will culminate on the two climbs in the old centre of Laon. The last kilometre goes up around 7%

 
Very interested to see how this one goes, since it's an idea I've tried to flesh out a couple of times.

Also, Asturiano, I saw your GP Ciudad de Gijón linked on APM recently, very nice little race, most of the climbs short enough that it's not a pure climber's race but with nearly 40 of them, that's going to break some legs.
 
Jun 28, 2012
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Libertine Seguros said:
Very interested to see how this one goes, since it's an idea I've tried to flesh out a couple of times.

Also, Asturiano, I saw your GP Ciudad de Gijón linked on APM recently, very nice little race, most of the climbs short enough that it's not a pure climber's race but with nearly 40 of them, that's going to break some legs.
Unfortunately, I can't do such a race of my own home area. Well, I could, just that the race would be pan-flat.
 
Jun 28, 2012
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Jun 12, 2010
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Nice Tour of Greece. Hope the riders won't be affected too much by all the potholes, parked cars in the middle of the street and goats and donkeys appearing out of nowhere.
 
Stage 10: Fiume (Croazia) - Zagabria (Croazia), 192km





Climbs:
Gornje Jelenje (Passo di Monte Gellegne)(cat.3) 8,4km @ 4,8%
Šestine (cat.4) 5,0km @ 4,2%

Yes, it's time to add an element of surprise to my Giro. After all, my Tour de France featured just 20km outside of France (in Belgium) and of my three Vueltas a España, there have been a total of four stages leaving Spanish territory - one into Gibraltar, which is hardly straying far or for very long (less than 10km), one into Andorra, which happens regularly anyway, and two in Portugal. And after all the fuss about coming up with a Giro with all the options that are available in Italy, it must therefore be a bit of a surprise to see me disappearing outside of the host nation, with this stage linking two of the biggest cities in Croatia, Rijeka (Fiume) and Zagreb (Zagabria). Croatia hasn't hosted the Giro since 2004, when there was a stage into and out of Pula, but these were of little consequence overall other than stats-padding for Ale-Jet in that sprint-infested race.

The stage itself is uncomplicated, but as this is a transitional midweek stage this shan't be too much of a problem for the race. Again, making the sprinters work for their wins is the name of the game, as the stage is designated flat but there are a couple of bumps, right at the start and end of the stage. The very start of the stage is the Gornje Jelenje pass, which is just long enough to ensure a strong breakaway, but after that the stage is at first rolling, then utterly flat, so the trains will have a chance to organise themselves before the final uphill.

Although the city of Zagreb sits at the foot of the Medvednica mountain(s), whose highest peak of Sljeme is over 1000m above sea level, we are only scraping the foothills here; the high mountains are still to come. So instead we just climb to the village area of Šestine, best known for the fairytale church of St Mark and Groblje Šestine, a famous cemetery. The climb up to this village is 5km long, but the average is only just over 4%, so I guess you could call it a Poggio-alike, though there are four or five stretches where it gets up to 10 or 11% briefly. This one may burn off the Guardinis and Quarantas of the world, but more durable sprinters should stay in the bunch; the big question will be if anybody can escape the clutches of the pack ahead of the very fast and very straight descent into the city centre of Zagreb, where the stage will finish with a final corner at 400m to go and a fast run in to Trg Bana Josipa Jelačića where the finishing line awaits.

Rijeka:


Zagreb:
 
Stage 11: Zagabria (Croazia) - Lubiana (Slovenia), 163km





We move back towards the home of the race with our second flat stage in a row, this one much more suited to the fast men, as it's a real calm-before-the-storm stage, without a single climb to mark it. Although the Giro had to pass through it briefly in order to get to Pula in 2004, the Giro hasn't stopped in Slovenia since 2001, when they held this stage from Lido di Jesolo to Ljubljana (Lubiana), followed by this only slightly less uninspiring stage from Bled to Gorizia re-entering Italy (looping across the border on the closing circuit). Not that today's stage will be any more exciting; we leave Croatia early and head through the attractive town of Novo Mesto, but apart from scenery there's not really a lot to this stage - not a single categorised climb to mark it, in fact. We do have a lap around Ljubljana for touristic purposes at the end, though.

There is a one-day race between these two former Yugoslav capitals. It is rated 1.2 and is invariably won by Slovenes, usually from the Adria Mobil squad. It alternates which direction it travels; it appears either not to have been held or to have lost UCI status this year; last year's race was from Zagreb to Ljubljana and was won by Marko Kump in a sprint. I expect a similar outcome in terms of the form of race (in terms of direct outcome I would have thought that as a more durable guy Kump would be more competitive in the previous stage).

Ljubljana:


 
Libertine Seguros said:
There is a one-day race between these two former Yugoslav capitals. It is rated 1.2 and is invariably won by Slovenes, usually from the Adria Mobil squad. It alternates which direction it travels; it appears either not to have been held or to have lost UCI status this year; last year's race was from Zagreb to Ljubljana and was won by Marko Kump in a sprint.
This year the race was called Croatia-Slovenia and was run from Zagreb to Novo Mesto. That sadly means a flat finish, while the finish in Ljubljana used to be uphill on the Schlossberg.
 
Has this thread had any fantasy world's courses?

1race, 1 circuit, 1 chance.

within the rules that it has to start in a population centre of some sort and then a 100k or so trek to a circuit that should not exceed 20k or so and not be less than say 12

Other than that, no rules, anywhere in the world, any climbs and finishing point you want.

Or even better an Olympic one. Has to take place around a global city but other than that no rules. 250-300k of whatever you want.
 

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