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Radios in races - are you in favour?

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May 25, 2009
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I'd like to have them banned, yes.
Having radios eliminates mistakes by riders. But today's close racing needs mistakes to let the gaps open up.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Bala Verde said:
just like US Postal :rolleyes:. At least AT&T prides itself in being the world's largest network, and they are using the GSM network, that's being used in 75% of the ROW. Verizon, aren't they the ones that make those walky-talky phones? Maybe a good time for T-Mobile to make a come back, since they are expanding their base in US market... Aren't their any weird and huge US concrete or steel manufacturers, like Hungarian 'betonexpresz' or soemthing like an Abramoviclike 'gasprom'...:D

But hey if we are actually trying to find reasons to sponsor cycling...

Why are Liquigas or Lampre, LPR, Astana, a sponsor. Where do they sell their products, and what does Astana even 'sell' besides a happily smiling sun? Or Skil-Shimano? Does Shimano really need any extra 'cycling' exposure (or perhaps it's like a cervelo test team).

well, i don't think that either verizon or at&t would be willing to pay for a pro cycling team so that they can sell more race radios! a true corporate giant like the two companies that you mentioned need a more justifiable reason and product fit to invest in the current economic climate.

EUROPEAN wooden flooring / cement companies / steel companies have a stronger cultural fit with cycling and therefore can sell cycling participation in their local markets and to their shareholders. it's still harder to make this sell in north america.
 
Here's some copypasta from a Velonews feature. It's Scott Moninger talking about Mancebo's move in California earlier this year:

Most of the field — or at least Astana — was waiting for info (time gaps, etc.) that was very delayed or inaccurate because of the serious weather conditions,” recalled Moninger. “Chris Horner, an old-school guy, finally said ‘screw this, we need to start riding NOW! We can't wait for the word from the boss.’

“Chris has the knowledge of reading a race from a time when riders were forced to read a race because radios didn't exist. His call ended up saving Astana's **** and afterwards they all recognized this,” Moninger added. “Lance (Armstrong)'s first real pro team was Motorola, so he was one of the first riders in the world to use race radio technology and he was the type of rider who really needed it and benefited from it. Considering that Chris and Lance are about the same age, I think Chris has a much better ability to read a race and I think the radio is the difference there.”
 
Apr 2, 2009
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mr. tibbs said:
Here's some copypasta from a Velonews feature. It's Scott Moninger talking about Mancebo's move in California earlier this year:

Most of the field — or at least Astana — was waiting for info (time gaps, etc.) that was very delayed or inaccurate because of the serious weather conditions,” recalled Moninger. “Chris Horner, an old-school guy, finally said ‘screw this, we need to start riding NOW! We can't wait for the word from the boss.’

“Chris has the knowledge of reading a race from a time when riders were forced to read a race because radios didn't exist. His call ended up saving Astana's **** and afterwards they all recognized this,” Moninger added. “Lance (Armstrong)'s first real pro team was Motorola, so he was one of the first riders in the world to use race radio technology and he was the type of rider who really needed it and benefited from it. Considering that Chris and Lance are about the same age, I think Chris has a much better ability to read a race and I think the radio is the difference there.”

I liked those comments posted during the ToC. I am against the radios for riders. It makes for a more exciting race for the fans. The race is played out by the participants and not the directors, etc. I feel the radios take away from the race being a race. Your director is telling you what he sees on the TV in his car or what he hears on race radio. The riders need to make decisions based on what they see developing in the race and being more attentive to riders' moves during the race.
 
Apr 2, 2009
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Didn't read the whole thread but isn't this on the table regarding the UCI? radios or no radios? Is the UCI the ones responsible for radios being allowed or not? I don't know, just wondering.
 
This is probably a bit off track here, but I recall the presidentital debate between Al Gore and W, and everyone was wondering why W was so quick and articulate in their last debate but such a dumb dud in the previous ones, and they showed a pic of him with what seemed to be a small, rectangular object on his back under his suit, and then showed a pic of Lance with a similar small, rectangluar object (a radio?) strapped to his back. I guess if it helped W get in for 8 years, then what the hell, let's all wear radios.
 
LOL!

shawnrohrbach said:
This is probably a bit off track here, but I recall the presidentital debate between Al Gore and W..

It was the 2004 Bush-Kerry debate. A lot of people thought Karl Rove was on the other end, whispering into W's ear. Kerry never bought into it though. And photos from the debate gave no clues that he had an ear piece in.

1010-01.jpg
 
Regards radios, I think radios should be used but it should only be one way and on one frequency.

The one way system would be from the Commissaire of the race to the riders, and directeur sportifs. The only information provided should be dangerous points on the road, crashes, warnings against rule breakages, announcements to directuer sportifs that they can move forward to join a break or fall back if the break ends.

You may think that once a break is established that the peloton can then hear when the break is coming to a danger point and therefore calculate the distance the break has. Well, to counter this, once the break is established the commissaire up front can give the directeur sportifs in the cars in the break a new frequency by paper or by mouth and allow them to change the frequency on the radio to a particular channel, riders could then do this by a control piece on the lead to the earpiece, similar to that on a mobile phone.

Also I would ban TV's, mobile phones, and other communication equipment from the cars so that directeurs cannot pass on information to riders. Finally, and as much as I would miss this, ban the timing board from giving information to the peloton, but allow it for the break so they gain motivation.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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What prevents a team mechanic or some team personel watching the race via TV to call the DS and tell him how far the break is? Absolutely nothing, removing or limiting the radios will be pointless, technology has surpassed what they can limit so don't expect them to be removed. If removed it will only be a cosmetic removal as they'll have cell phones or some kind of radio reciever/transmitter to communicate.
 
May 1, 2009
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Big_Blue_Dave said:
Also I would ban TV's, mobile phones, and other communication equipment from the cars so that directeurs cannot pass on information to riders. Finally, and as much as I would miss this, ban the timing board from giving information to the peloton, but allow it for the break so they gain motivation.

I think this would just be too complex to enforce. Also the whole one way radio thing starts to get in to the territory of radios having to be inspected etc. Before you know it we start getting cheating scandals related to radios as well as (well, you know). I don't think the sport needs that.

I'm really not convinced of the huge safety advantage using radios. Has there been a real reduction in the number of accidents in pro-cycling since radios were introduced?

As for the people using the whole "you cant stop technology" argument, I would disagree. Already aero bars, disk wheels and sub-6.8kg bikes are banned. And look at another example - formula 1 is probably the most technologically advanced sport there is, and they ban things such as turbo chargers and slick tyres just to try and keep the racing interesting.
 
Jun 3, 2009
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I am in favour of having race radios for safety but other than that, absolutly not.

I know F1 monitors team communications, if cycling can sort out a similar system where the Commisaires can listen in to any team radio at any time without warning, we should have less use of them.

Let's see how the French national champs go without them.
 
Jun 3, 2009
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Radios, along with a whole list of 'modern/ conveniences, have made cycling on the road very similar (in odd ways) to modern pro wrestling...a contrived competition...maybe not as bad as pro wrestling or roller derby, but certainly without the 'pureness' of other sports. All radios should go, along with:
2. anything computer related to aid the rider (monitors, etc.)
3. any equipment not available to anyone in the field. (IOW, even the playing field, equipment-wise).
4. anything BUT neutral follow vehicles...absolutely NO medical or mechanical 'tows' and certainly no following of vehicles back to the bunch.

This 'going back to the team car' for bottles and food is just lame...either take it with you, or get it in the feed zone....remember them? If one stops and really thinks about what road cycling is now...it is a sham...the payoffs between teams and riders was always there, and the evolution of radios, team cars, flat-out cheating by getting tows and pushes, well, that has seriously impaired the sport.
 
dpcowboy said:
Radios, along with a whole list of 'modern/ conveniences, have made cycling on the road very similar (in odd ways) to modern pro wrestling...a contrived competition...maybe not as bad as pro wrestling or roller derby, but certainly without the 'pureness' of other sports. All radios should go, along with:
2. anything computer related to aid the rider (monitors, etc.)
3. any equipment not available to anyone in the field. (IOW, even the playing field, equipment-wise).
4. anything BUT neutral follow vehicles...absolutely NO medical or mechanical 'tows' and certainly no following of vehicles back to the bunch.

This 'going back to the team car' for bottles and food is just lame...either take it with you, or get it in the feed zone....remember them? If one stops and really thinks about what road cycling is now...it is a sham...the payoffs between teams and riders was always there, and the evolution of radios, team cars, flat-out cheating by getting tows and pushes, well, that has seriously impaired the sport.

Are you serious? No computer on the bike, so I'd have no way of measuring distance covered, and estimating distance remaining to finish? Then if I raced in the Tour of China or something, I'd have to ride a "Flying Pigeon" bike b/c the team from Outer Mongolia couldn't afford carbon? And for 200km stages I'd have to carry 10 bottles with me at the start, and load up with another 10 at the single feedzone? Yes, I can see how this would make cycling much more 'pure.' As in pure bs. Great troll post, though (cause you can't be serious...)
 
Jun 3, 2009
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Race Radio

Hi all. Recent addition and new recreational rider (not a former pro, amateur,etc..), hence the moniker. I am all for race radio, for the reason that I think it allows the most fit rider with the best tactics (from the entire team, DS included) to win. I agree it selects against the smarter, but not as strong of a rider. In regard to Menchov's win, the flip side of him not having to pull after Sastre attacked made for brilliant viewing as DiLuca gave everything he had to put time on Mechov. Also, Evan's knew how much time Sastre was gainging on him on the Alpe last year, but still couldn't respond. Also breaks not making it, who cares? Bunch sprints are also fun to watch.

I have been to a few cycling threads and found for the most part that those that are against radios, or change in general, are older racers and I am wondering if that is the case here. I am also wondering if that is the case for race directors as well, that are selectively banning radios.

Just an ignorant newbie, put me in my place, all.
 
boalio said:
I think this would just be too complex to enforce. Also the whole one way radio thing starts to get in to the territory of radios having to be inspected etc. Before you know it we start getting cheating scandals related to radios as well as (well, you know). I don't think the sport needs that.

I'm really not convinced of the huge safety advantage using radios. Has there been a real reduction in the number of accidents in pro-cycling since radios were introduced?

As for the people using the whole "you cant stop technology" argument, I would disagree. Already aero bars, disk wheels and sub-6.8kg bikes are banned. And look at another example - formula 1 is probably the most technologically advanced sport there is, and they ban things such as turbo chargers and slick tyres just to try and keep the racing interesting.

Easy answer, radios are provided by the race organiser, can't fault that one, and can't excuse any other form of communication devices. Disc wheels by the way are not banned, just not used on the road (front wheel only for this example) due to wind direction potentially causing problems with being pushed over the road therefore not being very aerodynamic.
 
Mar 19, 2009
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I would like my director in my ear telling me when the next stop ahead sign sprint is coming up on the Tues. group rider. LOL
 
May 1, 2009
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I am in the Hinault camp -

"It is only a Game Boy with a gigolo at the end who tells the rider when he must go and p**s."
 
Mar 18, 2009
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I hate how cycling has become so calculated in recent years because of the radios but I'm not sure you can really eliminate them at this point. I wonder if it would help to limit it to one rider per team allowed to wear one (as it is in the NFL). I'm not sure what that does immediately but it might be a small step towards having more control over in the future.

As for DeLuca, at first I admired him for not wearing a radio but after his decision to not use aero bars and other TT equipment in the Giro (which was so close) I think it's just foolish arrogance.