How To Say my name! Pronunciation thread

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I have come to the conclussion that while I appreciate commentators - and media people in general - who make an effort of pronouncing names correctly, my main pet peeve is when written media doesn't write names correctly, using the right names, which is also something that is much easier than pronunciation; you just have to type the right things... It's also why I take care to write Geoghegan Hart very time I talk about the former Giro winner on Ineos.
I also try to write the names correctly very time, unless I'm making a lame pun, which unfortunately is pretty much very time.
 
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Yes, all the sites make mistakes, which is somewhat understandable, but they could correct them faster.

The Twitter account for the Elsy Jacobs Festival in Luxembourg mixed up two Movistar teammates and initially awarded a stage victory to Leah Norsgaard.
The official account for Classica Almeria tried to send Matteo Jorgenson to the race, even though he was doing La Provence at the time... are they... trying to merge the Danes and the Americans on Movistar?

What I don't understand about WCS, is that it seems to be completely random whether or not the got the "hang of" the - admittedly, rather confusing - thing regarding whether Danes go by their middle names.
And then we got CN, who still insist on calling Valgren "Michael Valgren Andersen"...
 
The official account for Classica Almeria tried to send Matteo Jorgenson to the race, even though he was doing La Provence at the time... are they... trying to merge the Danes and the Americans on Movistar?

What I don't understand about WCS, is that it seems to be completely random whether or not the got the "hang of" the - admittedly, rather confusing - thing regarding whether Danes go by their middle names.
And then we got CN, who still insist on calling Valgren "Michael Valgren Andersen"...
I was following a live ticker for TdS to see the intermediate times today, because PCS wasn't listing them before a short while later, and my first thought was honestly that Andreas Nielsen was a Norwegian I hadn't heard about, before I realised it was actually Stokbro.
 
I have come to the conclussion that while I appreciate commentators - and media people in general - who make an effort of pronouncing names correctly, my main pet peeve is when written media doesn't write names correctly, using the right names, which is also something that is much easier than pronunciation; you just have to type the right things... It's also why I take care to write Geoghegan Hart very time I talk about the former Giro winner on Ineos.
It's also just a matter of respect towards Goeghaon Hart to spell his name correct.
 
I have come to the conclussion that while I appreciate commentators - and media people in general - who make an effort of pronouncing names correctly, my main pet peeve is when written media doesn't write names correctly, using the right names, which is also something that is much easier than pronunciation; you just have to type the right things... It's also why I take care to write Geoghegan Hart very time I talk about the former Giro winner on Ineos.
I get an allergic reaction every time I see people writing either Aert or Poel without anything preceding that :grimacing:
 
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I get an allergic reaction everytime i see people writing either Aert or Poel without anything preceding that :grimacing:
I feel the same way, when I see the word "I" being written in lower case ;) (I don't think you usually do it, and you have just written a post in which you got it right multiple times, but I have noticed that Logic consistently ignore using the capital I, though that has become part of his charm to me) Edit: Ha, you actually noticed it yourself, well done :hearteyes:

I also attempt to distinguish between the Dutch and Flemish ways of writing van/Van or de/De in surnames, but then you also have to know if someone, like van Aert for instance, has roots across the border to get it right each time.
 
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I feel the same way, when I see the word "I" being written in lower case ;) (I don't think you usually do it, you have just written a post where you get it right mulpiple times, but I have noticed that Logic consistently ignore using the capital I, though that has become part of his charm to me) Edit: Ha, you actually noticed it yourself, well done :hearteyes:

I also attempt to distinguish between the Dutch and Flemish ways of writing van/Van or de/De in surnames, but then you also have to know if someone, like van Aert for instance, has roots across the border to get it right each time.
What does mulpiple mean? :kissingheart: (I expect broccolidwarf to come and call me out on always picking a fight, now).

As I understand it, if you write Van der Poel on its own, you should start with a capital V, while it's lower case if you write the first name too. While in Flemish, all Van's, Der's and De's always start with a capital letter.
 
What does mulpiple mean? :kissingheart: (I expect broccolidwarf to come and call me out on always picking a fight, now).

As I understand it, if you write Van der Poel on its own, you should start with a capital V, while it's lower case if you write the first name too. While in Flemish, all Van's, Der's and De's always start with a capital letter.
I also made an edit, but not soon enough :tearsofjoy:

I actually didn't know that, so I have definitely been making some mistakes of my own, but it won't happen again from now on (at least not that particular mistake)
 
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What does mulpiple mean? :kissingheart: (I expect broccolidwarf to come and call me out on always picking a fight, now).

As I understand it, if you write Van der Poel on its own, you should start with a capital V, while it's lower case if you write the first name too. While in Flemish, all Van's, Der's and De's always start with a capital letter.
Wout van Aert's family on father's side being originally from the Netherlands makes this rule a bit more difficult for cycling fans. :p
Also a Dutch surname starting with van, der, de,... is also being written with a capital letter if the family is noble. Just to make it a bit harder.
 
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When English commentators get anglo names wrong.. Matt Stephens has taken to calling an Australian time trialist 'Rohan Deneez'.

I have recently picked up from Chennaoui and Been that the final n in Flemish /Dutch names such as Vliegen and Groenewegen is scarcely pronounced, which I hadn't previously realised, but I notice Jose Been also doing the same to Danish ...sen names: is that accurate, or is she applying her own language's principles to another?
 
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When English commentators get anglo names wrong.. Matt Stephens has taken to calling an Australian time trialist 'Rohan Deneez'.
I have never heard any commentator ever pronouncing Hesjedal's last name the way he himself said it should be pronounced.

The name is of Norwegian origin, though, if I'm not mistaken, so I guess that's where the difficult part was. But the way Hesjedal himself pronounced it was nothing beyond someone who only speaks English could take a guess at.
 
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When English commentators get anglo names wrong.. Matt Stephens has taken to calling an Australian time trialist 'Rohan Deneez'.

I have recently picked up from Chennaoui and Been that the final n in Flemish /Dutch names such as Vliegen and Groenewegen is scarcely pronounced, which I hadn't previously realised, but I notice Jose Been also doing the same to Danish ...sen names: is that accurate, or is she applying her own language's principles to another?
That is very, very inaccurate.
 
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I have recently picked up from Chennaoui and Been that the final n in Flemish /Dutch names such as Vliegen and Groenewegen is scarcely pronounced, which I hadn't previously realised,
This is true for all Dutch words ending on -en, following a consonant in a second, third... syllable. It's not just names, but all words in general. Pronouncing the "end n" isn't per se wrong, but it feels very unnatural. The Flemish guy from Eurosport does it, and it drives me up the wall. (Usually this is done by people who speak poorly in every day life, with a fat accent, and then try to talk "correctly" for other people). Nobody talks like that, and not pronouncing the n in these words generally makes for a more fluent speech as it is usually easier to bridge towards the next word, unless (at least in Flanders, not in the Netherlands) the next word starts with a vowel (in which case you can pronounce the n, to bridge).
"We gaan morgen eten." The first n will (in Flanders) will be pronounced to bridge towards the next word starting with a vowel. The next n will not be pronounced.
"We gaan morgen fietsen." Neither will be pronounced.

This is true for names like Vliegen, Groenewegen, Philipsen, Naesen, Teunissen...
Even the n in Wellens will usually not be pronounced.
 
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