Question Should triathletes be allowed on bikes?

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I feel some people have taken this thread slightly too seriously, it's supposed to be a joke about how triathletes are poor bike handlers and annoy cyclists, not an actual debate on the merits of triathletes
My wife coaches tri-athletes....they are a serious lot. That said she and her associates have one recommendation for their clients: do your hard intervals on a trainer, not the road. Apparently they get fixated on wattage numbers and tend to hit objects while actually riding in the World. She has to laugh at that as well.
Her second recommendation is for them to train on a standard road bike most of the time, rather than riding 16 mph in their aero bars. Makes them better bike "handlers". Data still incoming on that training protocol.
 
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My wife coaches tri-athletes....they are a serious lot. That said she and her associates have one recommendation for their clients: do your hard intervals on a trainer, not the road. Apparently they get fixated on wattage numbers and tend to hit objects while actually riding in the World. She has to laugh at that as well.
Her second recommendation is for them to train on a standard road bike most of the time, rather than riding 16 mph in their aero bars. Makes them better bike "handlers". Data still incoming on that training protocol.
. Train on a standard road bike is that because of the lack of aerodynamics of that riding position....16 mph nobody rides 16 mph in aero bars....good advice though
 
. Train on a standard road bike is that because of the lack of aerodynamics of that riding position....16 mph nobody rides 16 mph in aero bars....good advice though
The recommendation for training on a road bike is for their skill improvement. That wouldn't mean not riding their tri bike. The transitional skills for grade changes is one of the bigger cycling weaknesses they've noticed. That and the pointless, grinding cadence even into headwinds.
By the way, most beginning tri folks don't exceed 20 mph that often. They need to learn how to do that.
 
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The recommendation for training on a road bike is for their skill improvement. That wouldn't mean not riding their tri bike. The transitional skills for grade changes is one of the bigger cycling weaknesses they've noticed. That and the pointless, grinding cadence even into headwinds.
By the way, most beginning tri folks don't exceed 20 mph that often. They need to learn how to do that.
Are u talking 20 mph in training or during a race..... great advice ur a wise man
 
Are u talking 20 mph in training or during a race..... great advice ur a wise man
Both. If they can't learn to ride 20 mph on a standard bike and handle terrain changes that challenge gets more pronounced on a tri position. Once they get confident on the road bike the TT position seems much, much faster. It usually is.
 
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Both. If they can't learn to ride 20 mph on a standard bike and handle terrain changes that challenge gets more pronounced on a tri position. Once they get confident on the road bike the TT position seems much, much faster. It usually is.
I guess I’m the opposite I can’t hardly go fast on a standard road bike. It’s so un aerodynamic ..... so much air drag.... it took me 10 minutes to master the aero bars.... I ride 95 percent of the time on them..... sooo much more comfortable
 
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why go procycling thats a down grade of their skills....grand tours a boat load of guys 6 inches apart everyone of them hiding from the wind behind the guy in front of them.....the first 10 miles and the last 10 miles are actually racing the rest is just mindless pedaling .....time trials are an honest assessment of a riders physical ability....one mans results come from one mans effort...not the result of hiding from the wind saving their legs for the last 5 miles of riding
Aleksandr Vinokourov and Laurent Jalabert both won their respective age group titles at 70.3 World Champs in Nice.

By big margins too I might add, and neither are particularly strong swimmers.
 
Aleksandr Vinokourov and Laurent Jalabert both won their respective age group titles at 70.3 World Champs in Nice.

By big margins too I might add, and neither are particularly strong swimmers.
Yes.....you do know their history? Not that they weren't very talented guys but they pooed on public trust some time ago. Maybe not the best example of an athlete that moves to tri and does well.
 
Yes.....you do know their history? Not that they weren't very talented guys but they pooed on public trust some time ago. Maybe not the best example of an athlete that moves to tri and does well.
I know exactly who they are.

I quoted them because apparently "single sport athletes would struggle to even finish" according to Mr "I swear I'm not a triathlete but I'll defend their honour tooth and nail".

Funnily enough, the winner of the pro race at Nice - Gustav Iden - rode a Venge with clip on aerobars to the fastest bike split, to the derision of the race commentators and Slowtwitch peanut gallery. They couldn't understand that a less aero, but lighter, better handling bike would be a better option on that course.
 
I know exactly who they are.

I quoted them because apparently "single sport athletes would struggle to even finish" according to Mr "I swear I'm not a triathlete but I'll defend their honour tooth and nail".

Funnily enough, the winner of the pro race at Nice - Gustav Iden - rode a Venge with clip on aerobars to the fastest bike split, to the derision of the race commentators and Slowtwitch peanut gallery. They couldn't understand that a less aero, but lighter, better handling bike would be a better option on that course.
I'd agree on the "single sport" response, for sure. Tri is also not the sanctuary of purity any more than other sports so that point might not need to be made.
The part about the bike is perfect. Pure aero works in a pure aero environment and ridden accordingly. Most new road bikes are pretty aero and probably suited his position the way it should. Cost him a few bill$$$ less, too.
 
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Sep 1, 2019
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I know exactly who they are.

I quoted them because apparently "single sport athletes would struggle to even finish" according to Mr "I swear I'm not a triathlete but I'll defend their honour tooth and nail".

Funnily enough, the winner of the pro race at Nice - Gustav Iden - rode a Venge with clip on aerobars to the fastest bike split, to the derision of the race commentators and Slowtwitch peanut gallery. They couldn't understand that a less aero, but lighter, better handling bike would be a better option on that course.
again I am not a triathlete....I am a runner/time trial bike rider...I have done the duathalon thing and I have nothing but respect for the triathlete/iron man most of all....they are super human
 
again I am not a triathlete....I am a runner/time trial bike rider...I have done the duathalon thing and I have nothing but respect for the triathlete/iron man most of all....they are super human
My wife had to drop tri for a period after a running injury. She went to the swim/ride version and did well. Because she could ride a bike.
Her take after winning at Tri and the Duo is that the best Tri studs are really disciplined and train super hard. That is their advantage. They are usually good at one phase of the sport and above average at the other two. She did admit that being good on the bike is a huge advantage.
 
The Slowtwitch author will find it's less dangerous than he had imagined - once he's off the back... the FTP is impressive but the repeatability of many short 600 - 700W efforts is what matters. Anaerobic capacity is the big part that he's overlooking. That and tactics / handling. Him witnessing multiple crashes in the P1-2 seems unusual, but ought to answer his own question of whether crit is dangerous. The worst / most frequent crashes are in the 4's because that's where the lowest skill-to-power ratio is. There is a huge difference in power and skill between the P1-2 and lower categories, but crashing at 24 MPH is not a lot better than crashing at 27 MPH
 
The Slowtwitch author will find it's less dangerous than he had imagined - once he's off the back... the FTP is impressive but the repeatability of many short 600 - 700W efforts is what matters. Anaerobic capacity is the big part that he's overlooking. That and tactics / handling. Him witnessing multiple crashes in the P1-2 seems unusual, but ought to answer his own question of whether crit is dangerous. The worst / most frequent crashes are in the 4's because that's where the lowest skill-to-power ratio is. There is a huge difference in power and skill between the P1-2 and lower categories, but crashing at 24 MPH is not a lot better than crashing at 27 MPH
Crits are what everyone thinks they are: risky as sh*t until you get to Cat2 and above. Tri guys should do a stage race or two and get used to being dropped. If they can produce the wattage to stay in contact; they'll get stronger. If they get stronger they'll begin to enjoy it. Amateur crits are just crapshoots and you can get hit from any angle even when you're in a break.
 
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