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Tirreno-Adriatico

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This stage really showed the importance of having a strong team around a GC rider. It was expected that Klöden could get pretty isolated today which is also what happened with only Iglinsky there to help when it was needed the most.

When Scarponi, Basso, Garzelli and Nibali gained more and more time in the big climb it was obvious that they had the strongest legs of the day. To make up any time on them after the climb Astana and Columbia would have had to have more riders to help chase them back but as it turned out Iglinsky and Siutsou wasn't enough to gain any time back. It wasn't until later when George Hincapie reached the chase group in the end that they started gaining alot of time against the italians.

It's still pretty early in the season though so it's hard to have a alot of riders in good form at the same time let alone enough to support 2 leaders in 2 diffrent races. At this point it's more the strongest riders that have the edge rather then the strongest teams.
 
Another great day's spectacle. Terrific, attacking riding and once again. We have been spoilt, at the start of this season.

Astana again undone, by having a very weak team.

All I can say is, I hope the Tour of Californian, Lance/Levi bandwagon was worth it, because they have thrown away two MAJOR European Tour titles, to keep an emerging, New World one.

Odd priorities for a Kazakh outfit.:rolleyes:

ingsve said:
It's still pretty early in the season though so it's hard to have a alot of riders in good form at the same time let alone enough to support 2 leaders in 2 different races. At this point it's more the strongest riders that have the edge rather then the strongest teams.

A good point.
 
ingsve said:
This stage really showed the importance of having a strong team around a GC rider. It was expected that Klöden could get pretty isolated today which is also what happened with only Iglinsky there to help when it was needed the most.

When Scarponi, Basso, Garzelli and Nibali gained more and more time in the big climb it was obvious that they had the strongest legs of the day. To make up any time on them after the climb Astana and Columbia would have had to have more riders to help chase them back but as it turned out Iglinsky and Siutsou wasn't enough to gain any time back. It wasn't until later when George Hincapie reached the chase group in the end that they started gaining alot of time against the italians.

It's still pretty early in the season though so it's hard to have a alot of riders in good form at the same time let alone enough to support 2 leaders in 2 diffrent races. At this point it's more the strongest riders that have the edge rather then the strongest teams.
I would like to add something to this story. At the bottom of the climb, Scarponi already attacked. At that point, the peloton exploded.
At some point, Robert Gesink had lost 1'00 in the first two kilometers. Then he finally came into his rythm, passed 25 riders, and 2km before the top, he was at 8 seconds of the leaders (you could even see this on the helicopter view). But there, he just couldn't close the final meters, and dropped back to the group with Klöden in the downhill.

As 22-year old, he clearly has problems with the explosion on a bottom of a climb, but his climbing rythm was faster then the guys up front... damn.. that's impresive
 
Mar 12, 2009
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Just watched highlights, impressive racing!, Basso looks better each day - will he ride the Giro?, Astana certainly incapable of controlling a race like that, but was attacking racing in their defence.
 
What is really exciting, is that the Giro has 3 stages mid race, (14-16) that are very similar in profile. Stage 16, in particular, is a tougher 237kms.
All before the final two killer mountaintop finishes!

Re: Gesink. He seems to like a fast tempo on long climbs, before launching attacks on the big hills.
I first noticed him in the Tour of Germany a couple of years back, climbing the insane Rettenbachferner.
Hard to believe he's still only 22.
I'll bet someone is looking over his shoulder......
 
Mar 14, 2009
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ingsve said:
This stage really showed the importance of having a strong team around a GC rider. It was expected that Klöden could get pretty isolated today which is also what happened with only Iglinsky there to help when it was needed the most.

When Scarponi, Basso, Garzelli and Nibali gained more and more time in the big climb it was obvious that they had the strongest legs of the day. To make up any time on them after the climb Astana and Columbia would have had to have more riders to help chase them back but as it turned out Iglinsky and Siutsou wasn't enough to gain any time back. It wasn't until later when George Hincapie reached the chase group in the end that they started gaining alot of time against the italians.

It's still pretty early in the season though so it's hard to have a alot of riders in good form at the same time let alone enough to support 2 leaders in 2 diffrent races. At this point it's more the strongest riders that have the edge rather then the strongest teams.
I caught the last 15 km or so of the stage, and it was very apparant that Kloden was left high and dry without the team support he needed. Hincapie was a beast, as he almost single handedly dropped the gap to the quartet from around 4 minutes to 1 minute before the finishing climb. I was suprised to see Kloden not put more of an effort in to the chase. I guess he was worried about getting burned on the final climb and losing even more time and dropping further down the GC.

On another note, the top four on the stage are all previously suspended dopers. I won't personaly judge them, as they have all served their time, but I wonder what all the young up and comers, such as Gesink, Lokvist and Hesjedal think of this quartet's early season success.
 
bikenrunnwt said:
On another note, the top four on the stage are all previously suspended dopers. I won't personaly judge them, as they have all served their time, but I wonder what all the young up and comers, such as Gesink, Lokvist and Hesjedal think of this quartet's early season success.

Ya, that is interesting. I wouldn't suggest that they in any way are cheating now though. Another fact they have in common is that they are all older more experienced riders from Italy in a race on home turf. That is a more significant
reason for them being up there on that stage.

As for what the younger riders may think I think all they can really do is work hard and gain experience themselves and if in fact anyone is cheating them then all they can do is hope those people will eventually get caught.
 
ingsve said:
Ya, that is interesting. I wouldn't suggest that they in any way are cheating now though. Another fact they have in common is that they are all older more experienced riders from Italy in a race on home turf. That is a more significant
reason for them being up there on that stage.

As for what the younger riders may think I think all they can really do is work hard and gain experience themselves and if in fact anyone is cheating them then all they can do is hope those people will eventually get caught.

Those riders (first four) are simply on another form level right now. Home turf, important Italian race... Plus the fact that they are older and more experienced, meaning their base level of form is higher then the base level of young(er) riders.
 
Mar 14, 2009
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I agree with what people are saying about Scarponi, Garzelli, Basso and Di Luca's in terms of experience, motivation, base fitness etc. I was more commenting on the psychological impact having these guys come back from suspensions and put out dominating displays of riding. Personally, I really like all four of these riders, I just hope they are smart enough to keep their hands out of the cookie jar.
 
Mar 17, 2009
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This race has pretty much encapsulated all that is currently wrong with pro cycling. The top 3 aren't exactly saints are they, yet nobody asks questions. Basso was kicking around there in the results along with Di Luca, For all that Basso has been doing to prove he has changed - and I grant him that working with the ex-Mapei doctor is a point in his favour - as one interview put it, he doesn't seem to understand that outside of Italy, fans want to see more than just saying, "you can trust me now, I have learnt my lesson".

As for the others: contempt.

All you have to do these days is keep quiet for a couple of years and everything will blow over.
 
Well, my stance on former dopers is that I don't really want them in the peloton. You don't even have to go so long as to enforce lifetime bans. That's not necessary. All that needs to happen is that the teams should just refuse to rehire these riders.

That's the real hypocracy in cycling. Teams are very quick to fire anyone that gets caught cheating but as soon as someone has served their time there are teams lining up to rehire them. That makes no sense. If you're so willing to forgive and forget as soon as someone has served their time then why fire them in the first place?

If more team managers would have the guts to not forgive riders that drag the sport through the mud then things would move quickly to the better.
 
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Dekker_Tifosi said:
In stages with no hill of notice in the final 100km whatsoever, yes.

I don't see him survive in the finale of Milan San Remo though

There could be a nervous stalemate in the finale that slows it enough for him to hang in there ... or, other contenders will blast it on the Cipressa and Poggio purely to eliminate him.
 
Mar 11, 2009
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I'd look to a team like Liquigas with a good climbing sprinter to try and drop Cav on the Cipressa. Columbia will no doubt drop back five guys to try and pace him back up, though.
 
Mr.DNA said:
I didn't know he was trying to find a team. I thought he just retired quietly.

Immediately after his suspension became official I believe he stated that he would not be attempting a return to the sport because of the time away from competition and his age. He has since been drawn back into wanting to compete and has an agent that has contacted several teams but with none willing to bite. He has been competing in mountain bike races and finished in the top ten in a grueling multi-day stage event I believe in Costa Rica, "La Conquistador"...something or other was the name.

I'm sure our Spanish speaking posters can give more accurate details.
 
Angliru said:
Immediately after his suspension became official I believe he stated that he would not be attempting a return to the sport because of the time away from competition and his age. He has since been drawn back into wanting to compete and has an agent that has contacted several teams but with none willing to bite. He has been competing in mountain bike races and finished in the top ten in a grueling multi-day stage event I believe in Costa Rica, "La Conquistador"...something or other was the name.

I'm sure our Spanish speaking posters can give more accurate details.

La Ruta de las Conquistadoras. I probably mangled the spelling. Three day mountain bike race across Costa Rica. Lots of amateurs race it.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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LA RUTA de los Conquistadores

http://www.adventurerace.com/eng/english.php

MTB race in Costa Rica

It's a bangin race that's been ongoing for 17years
4 days 11/11 thru 11/14
I believe they were initially planning to add of 5the day this year but that has been put off until 2010.

main.php