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Tour de France 2017 Stage 11: Eymet > Pau 203.5km

Page 11 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
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Pirazziattacks said:
Red Rick said:
Katusha being brilliant.
I don't think I even saw Kristoff up there at the end.
A late attack from Martin would have to be a better chance than Kristoff even coming close to winning a sprint at this point. Embarrassing tour from Lotto and Katusha so far really, what's the point when d grade sprinters like EBH and Groenewegen are better than their guys?
Groenewegen isn't in the same league as Hagen. He's beaten all, even Kittel, in sprints this year but ofcourse Tour is not ZLM tour.

However, I do rate him in the big group behind Kittel. Just around 3-5th fastest sprinter. He's already faster than Kristoff or Greipel.

btw speeds today
• Kittel (1st): 71.24km/h
• Groenewegen (2nd): 72.04km/h
• Boasson Hagen (3rd): 67.80km/h
 
Tonton said:
The way I see it, after an exciting Giro, the temperature on the forum went from pumped up to "here we go again, the Tour is gonna s**k as it always does", and besides the Sagan story splashing all over, there was more depressing stories than excitement. take away stage 9, and all we have so far is Valverde crashing, Bertie not the Contador that he was, tired Quintana won't beat Froome, Porte...well...

Actually, the first part of the Giro was boring, so there's hope...underwhelming so far though...

Stage 8 was all out attacking for the first two thirds. The finished was somewhat subdued, but overall it was a great stage.

So far, apart from the stage finishes, I've watched Stage 1 (from when G and Bardet were riding) and Stages 8 and 9 pretty much from the start. This tour has been wonderful :cool: (apart from the crashes).
 
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Brullnux said:
The_Beach said:
DNP-Old said:
Sprinterteams trying all they can for a at best 2nd place. Hilarious...
Why? If they don't catch Bodnar there is a 100% chance they won't win. It's not inconceivable that Kittel's leadout or positioning goes wrong.
It did, he still won

His positioning was not wrong. From the start of the tour, he has won coming from about 12th position with 500m to go at will.
 
Re: Re:

Tank Engine said:
Brullnux said:
The_Beach said:
DNP-Old said:
Sprinterteams trying all they can for a at best 2nd place. Hilarious...
Why? If they don't catch Bodnar there is a 100% chance they won't win. It's not inconceivable that Kittel's leadout or positioning goes wrong.
It did, he still won

His positioning was not wrong. From the start of the tour, he has won coming from about 12th position with 500m to go at will.
It certainly wasn't optimal. I'd consider where he was to be wrong.
 
Jul 12, 2017
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I know it sucks to hear for elitists, but when it comes to this form of dominance, it's about physiology and power output. Lead-out does not matter in the slightest.

Kittel needs team-mates that can reel in a breakaway, and then he can sit anywhere from 1-25 at 500 metres out and still win the sprint.
 
Re: Re:

Brullnux said:
Tank Engine said:
His positioning was not wrong. From the start of the tour, he has won coming from about 12th position with 500m to go at will.

It certainly wasn't optimal. I'd consider where he was to be wrong.
He does that on purpose. Quite interesting.

Kittel seemed to fortuitously fight his way from behind when he won in Liège and Troyes, and now Quick-Step Floors team manager Patrick Lefevere has confirmed to Cyclingnews that Kittel has specifically asked the team to set him up for a late charge to the line.

Kittel's success with this method marks a further evolution in sprinting tactics at the Tour de France. Long lead-out trains are no longer effective as no one team can control the front of the bunch long enough. Kittel so far avoided any of the cutthroat fighting for the best that his rivals have endured, choosing instead to sit back and wait for an opening to present itself.

"He prefers to come from behind, that's his wish. He doesn't want the team to lead him out, he wants to come from the second line," Lefevere revealed to Cyclingnews.
 
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carolina said:
I would argue that QS's tactic is working because Cav is no longer in the race. Dimension Data has been making some perfect leadouts for EBH. If they were making that kind of work for Cav, the results would have been different.

It wouldn't make any difference with a way sub-par Cavendish finishing the DD train. You are probably right though that the tactic would be dubious against a top tier sprinter like a fit Cav on the end of a top tier train.
 
Re: Re:

Zinoviev Letter said:
carolina said:
I would argue that QS's tactic is working because Cav is no longer in the race. Dimension Data has been making some perfect leadouts for EBH. If they were making that kind of work for Cav, the results would have been different.

It wouldn't make any difference with a way sub-par Cavendish finishing the DD train. You are probably right though that the tactic would be dubious against a top tier sprinter like a fit Cav on the end of a top tier train.
I'm pretty sure that 14-16 Bouhani could've beaten Kittel once or twice. Unless Demare he's got the quality. But Nacer is absolute horse crap this year. So the Kittel Blitz strikes on and on.