Tour de France Tour de France 2022: Stage 17 (Saint-Gaudens – Peyragudes, 129.7k)

The third time this Tour finishes on an airstrip, the second time the final hectometres are a brutally steep ramp, and the repeated error of designing a short mountain stage where the first 50 kilometres are flat – not one of ASO’s better or more original ideas, but given current circumstances, it might still do the trick.

Profile


Map


Route description
The stage starts from Saint-Gaudens, one of the Tour’s more frequent stopoffs for the Pyrenean stages – Patrick Konrad won here from the break last year. Located at the foot of the mountains, it developed as a religious community in the Middle Ages before growing to become the largest town in the upper Garonne valley.

The first 30-odd kilometres of the stage are spent riding along the edge of the Pyrenees, as far as the intermediate sprint in La Barthe-de-Neste. This section passes through Saint-Bertrand-de-Comminges, a sizeable city in Roman times and still so important in the Middle Ages that a (now UNESCO-inscribed) cathedral was built, before being overtaken by other cities in the region (such as Saint-Gaudens) and falling to a village size.




Immediately after the intermediate sprint, the riders turn south to head up the Neste valley as far as Arreau. This village is situated at the bottom of Col d’Aspin, the first climb of the day.


The descent to the Lac de Payolle is much shallower. Fortunately, there will be no flamme rouge arch to collapse onto any riders this time around, instead the route doubles back on itself for the next climb, Hourquette d’Anzican from its easier, but more irregular side, corresponding with the final 10.0 kilometres of the profile below.


The descent takes us back into the Neste valley, which is followed for a brief time into Saint-Lary-Soulan. Here, the riders turn left onto the Col d’Azet. Annoyingly, every profile I can find online is of a different variant, starting further north, so the official profile it is.


The final 8.8 kilometres of the climb are identical to those of the profile below.


The descent is much more technical than what we’ve seen earlier today and yesterday, I remember some crashes having happened here in the past. It ends in Loudenvielle, last seen as a stage finish in 2020 (victory for Nans Peters while Tadej Pogacar went berserk from the peloton on Peyresourde). The road starts to climb very quickly again as we reach the MTF. The final 8.0 kilometres of the stage are identical with the section of this profile from the junction to Loudenvielle onwards. The final 2.8 kilometres are the same as the 2017 stage, which saw Romain Bardet win a very conservatively-raced affair as Chris Froome lost the yellow jersey to Fabio Aru.


Final kilometre of that stage:

Final kilometres


Peyragudes is one half of a ski resort spanning both sides of the Peyresourde. Outside of cycling and winter sports, it’s best known for being a shooting location for the Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies, on this very runway.



Pyrenean scenery in Arreau with its 19th-century bridge.
 
All at the same time? The only edition prior to this one they all raced was 2015, when they all finished 13th or higher on the final mountain stage, so that would be your answer.
Not necessarily the same time...


It is the last time anyone can remember seeing him in a professional race, after all.
I'm pretty sure I've seen him since then.
 
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I thought at first that these long flats between the climbs are gonna kill any early moves but than I realized they only look long on the stage profile but the stage itself isn't even 130km long.
So the flat before Peyragudes is only about 5km, with the descent from Azet being quite technical this should definitely be another one for Pogacar the try. Jumbo to put WVA in the break again to kill that idea?
 
When was the last time those three were seriously considered options for a TdF mountain stage?
I get what you mean but I also think you are being unfair. Especially when talking about the stage-win. Jungels has actually won a stage this year... in which Pinot came close but no cigar. He was also 4th to Mende, so it is not like he does not have a chance on a good day. Froome was 3rd up to Alpe and his form seems to be improving. He is better than he has been in a long time.

Them winning or being capable to win from a break seems plausible at the moment.
 
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I get with you mean but I also think you are being unfair. Especially when talking about the stage-win. Jungels has actually won a stage this year... in which Pinot came close but no cigar. He was also 4th to Mende, so it is not like he does not have a chance on a good day. Froome was 3rd up to Alpe and his form seems to be improving. He is better than he has been in a long time.
Don't get me wrong, I think it's amazing they're back!
 
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If Pinot can manage to not ride like an idiot he will finally take his free stage if this goes to the break.

Holding out hope that Poggy shatters it early though and cracks the cyborgs armour and we get a madness
 

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