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Women and doping

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May 19, 2010
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neineinei said:
I missed the best part. Because of the cost (USD 500) the Brazilian Cycling Federation only performed two EPO tests on the female road cyclists. And they both came back positive.
 
May 26, 2010
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It really does prove that doping is pervasive at all levels of sport and people will do what they feel they have to do to win. Even when the financial gain ins't there.
 
Benotti69 said:
It really does prove that doping is pervasive at all levels of sport and people will do what they feel they have to do to win. Even when the financial gain ins't there.
yea, but lets not forget the Rio business is coming up.

Anyway quite a few epo positives in recent months (various sports), it could point to a better test.
 
Benotti69 said:
It really does prove that doping is pervasive at all levels of sport and people will do what they feel they have to do to win. Even when the financial gain ins't there.
Agreed. We should therefore be really thankful to God that the top of Male cycling in recent years has been so clean despite the massive financial rewards at stake there.
 
May 26, 2010
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Dazed and Confused said:
yea, but lets not forget the Rio business is coming up.

Anyway quite a few epo positives in recent months (various sports), it could point to a better test.
There are over 80 different types of EPO........what is needed is better funding for testing, longer bans for athletes, coaches and doctors to be part of the bans.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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The Carrot said:
http://www.theolympian.com/sports/article58392588.html

'European cycling champion Brezhniva banned for doping'

This can't be right. Women don't dope, Track cyclists don't dope. That would mean that the most dominant track cycling team ever would have to try really really hard to beat cheaters like this.
interesting.
So all these years she's been able to slip through UCI's stringent antidoping system? Shocker.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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is this the anti-doping Tindr or the pro-doping Tindr?

Or did I get my wires crossed

I will take one of each please and some genevieve jeanson cos she ticks both boxes
 
Oct 16, 2010
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I mean how good was the Dutch team yesterday?
Vos, Van Vleuten and Van der Breggen, three ladies all capable of taking the gold.
I know we have a tradition in women cycling, but come on.

Anybody know who's on the staff of the Dutch team?
 
Jul 16, 2012
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King Of Molehill said:


More and more of the pro's look skinnier and more ripped than ever.
----------------
And the 3 on the podium did not look half as skinny as 4th Place in the front on this Picture ! They actually looked like women, which is a good thing, and not always the case in women's cycling. No "chicken" winner in the men's race either, oh happy day for the clinic..
 
I should absolutely hope that none of the podium looked as skinny as Abbott, given she has a well-documented history of problems with eating disorders that threatened to derail her career, and that is massively exacerbated visually by her being quite tall when compared to most of the other stage racers and climbers in the péloton.

Mara's skillset is exactly what you'd expect from her build, too.
 
Jul 30, 2009
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Libertine Seguros said:
I should absolutely hope that none of the podium looked as skinny as Abbott, given she has a well-documented history of problems with eating disorders that threatened to derail her career, and that is massively exacerbated visually by her being quite tall when compared to most of the other stage racers and climbers in the péloton.

Mara's skillset is exactly what you'd expect from her build, too.
I didn't know about Abbott's history with eating disorders, I suppose that explains her crazy physique. I wouldn't have posted that picture if I hadn't been thinking in general that the women's peloton seem much leaner than I remember over the last few years. The Abbott pics just stood out more, obviously. I'll take it down.
 
Feb 10, 2010
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Eating disorders are quite common in endurance sports. I would say it's pretty evenly split by gender, but male food issues aren't frequently discussed. Who is too skinny and who isn't needs to be posted with care. It's a very difficult condition, so please think twice before clicking on "submit."

What made Ms. Thomas' case so terrible was USA Cycling just letting it go. And now the steroids have wrecked her. http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/cycling/2013/03/01/doping-scandal-haunts-tammy-thomas/1958053/

Also worth mentioning, at the time of Jeanson's rise, Canadian Cycling Federation would not give her a license because of dodgy blood values. Once again, USA Cycling had no problem with doping and issued her a license. Her case is very tragic, over, and over again. Hopefully she is able to have a rich life despite the terrible things that happened to her.

Also worth noting, female athletes seem to have an increased history of inappropriate relationships with male coaches that also seem to factor into the doping. Romantic relationships with coaches should be totally off limits, like lifetime ban off limits.
 
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King Of Molehill said:
Libertine Seguros said:
I should absolutely hope that none of the podium looked as skinny as Abbott, given she has a well-documented history of problems with eating disorders that threatened to derail her career, and that is massively exacerbated visually by her being quite tall when compared to most of the other stage racers and climbers in the péloton.

Mara's skillset is exactly what you'd expect from her build, too.
I didn't know about Abbott's history with eating disorders, I suppose that explains her crazy physique. I wouldn't have posted that picture if I hadn't been thinking in general that the women's peloton seem much leaner than I remember over the last few years. The Abbott pics just stood out more, obviously. I'll take it down.
The profile of the Rio road race is likely to have been a factor in that as well, though, for multiple reasons. Although we have had many positive steps towards improved professionalization and depth, there are still many places where women's cycling is dependent to some extent on the Olympic cycle. Funding comes and goes around it, you find many 'pop-up races' that join the calendar in countries that haven't qualified riders after the biggest teams have already set their calendars, hopefully enabling the host country's riders to achieve qualification criteria, the races that more closely resemble the Olympic course in profile will see improved startlists while many of the favourites will skip the races that don't, which was amplified in this year's situation because of the races preceding Rio being flat, and after La Course was riddled with crashes, nobody with serious designs on Rio would want to risk anything in London. It's also meant more attention has often been paid to the races where the puncheurs and grimpeurs of the world are contesting than the flatter, sprintier races because of the need to hunt out form guides for the Olympics.

What we had here was a road race which favoured strong climbers - in conjunction with the heavily reduced team numbers, a lot of competition for places meant many riders, especially in the more established nations, had to prove their worth, as it were, and many riders not able to otherwise get starts as TT specialists worked specifically on their climbing in order to justify Rio selection. The most obvious examples here are Gracie Elvin and Giorgia Bronzini, neither of whom the race truly suited, but who absolutely busted their guts to get the chance to line up for their teams. You then have the fact that riders who the course absolutely didn't suit but who had the capabilities to go to the track were doing so, but that also entailed jeopardising much of their road season as a result, therefore more powerfully-built sprint-style riders like Jolien d'Hoore have not been as prominent in the results sheets this year because of the need to get back to the top of their track cycling game. Some riders at the top of the sport are naturally slender or compact and built for climbing accordingly even taking the extreme example that is Mara Abbott out of the equation - Ash Moolman-Pasio, Kasia Niewiadoma, Claudia Lichtenberg - while we also saw returns to prominence of riders who had either been quiet through the point of Worlds courses not suiting them - e.g. Tatiana Guderzo - and also the profile of the course and smaller start list gave a reason for the most slender rider of all, Mara Abbott, to become a factor, which in the overwhelming majority of one day races she absolutely is not, owing to her lack of descending or pack skills. But while riders like Ash, Kasia, Claudia and Mara may be naturally advantaged, those all-rounders who can compete in almost any race - Emma J, Evie Stevie, ELB, Anna VDB, Annemiek, Lizzie, Megan, Marianne - could certainly be factors in the race, but in order to maximise their chances had to be in optimum climbing shape. A lot of the riders who were most prominent here in Rio will likely not be prominent in Doha; riders like Mara won't even show up. A flat course with likelihood of wind and a sprint means we're more likely to see the Kirsten Wilds, Jolien d'Hoores and Chloe Hoskings of the world in contention.

That, in and of itself, isn't too unlike the men's péloton really, where stage racers not normally thought of as threats for one-day races such as Froome were up there, top quality riders like Sagan and the various sprinters either didn't enter or focused on other events or both, and those riders who are one-day specialists but not necessarily tailored to the particular type of route (including the guy that eventually won of course) had to make sure they were in peak climbing form and in their best climbing shape. It's just more magnified with the women's péloton because the Olympic péloton is so reduced that competition for places is enormous in many countries, and they are a massive event relative to the rest of the calendar. I bet if you asked van der Breggen at the start of the year whether she wanted a gold medal or to win the WT overall, she'd take the gold medal every day of the week. Winning the WT would be great, possibly a more validated achievement than the men's ProTour overall was owing to the prominence within the women's calendar, sure, but we don't know if five years down the line the UCI may have changed tack once more and there's a different season competition that renders it obsolete, depending on whether it takes off or not, which events join or leave, and so on. An Olympic gold is an Olympic gold. That's why Annemiek is so frustrated she can't just put it behind her and move on to the next day like she usually can; she knows this was probably her last chance and the gold was there to win. Also: Anna's already won the Giro. Ask her in January if she wants another Giro or the Olympic gold, she'll probably say the Olympic gold. Ask Chris Froome, who had already won two Tours, the same question, does he want a third Tour or the Olympic gold, he'll at least have to think longer about it.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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DirtyWorks said:
Eating disorders are quite common in endurance sports. I would say it's pretty evenly split by gender, but male food issues aren't frequently discussed. Who is too skinny and who isn't needs to be posted with care. It's a very difficult condition, so please think twice before clicking on "submit."

What made Ms. Thomas' case so terrible was USA Cycling just letting it go. And now the steroids have wrecked her. http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/cycling/2013/03/01/doping-scandal-haunts-tammy-thomas/1958053/

Also worth mentioning, at the time of Jeanson's rise, Canadian Cycling Federation would not give her a license because of dodgy blood values. Once again, USA Cycling had no problem with doping and issued her a license. Her case is very tragic, over, and over again. Hopefully she is able to have a rich life despite the terrible things that happened to her.

Also worth noting, female athletes seem to have an increased history of inappropriate relationships with male coaches that also seem to factor into the doping. Romantic relationships with coaches should be totally off limits, like lifetime ban off limits.
Some really cogent observations.
 

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