Youngsters 2019

A companion thread to Sprinters 2019.

I can't remember a year with such an amazing crop of young riders. There was all the hype about Evenepoel (who has done pretty well) but we've had MVDP tearing the place up and looking the strongest rider in every flipping race he rides in. Pogacar, Philipsen ... obviously Bernal and Schachmann of those a little older. Even Van Aert is being made to look "so so".

It's great to see ... there's definitely the feel of changing the guard. Alaphilippe ( a bit older) is picking up Valverde's role. There are quite a few other young riders piling on the style at the moment.

Are we entering a new golden era for talent?
 
Sep 4, 2017
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Pogacar is certainly someone I could see becoming a very good rider but did not envisage him getting the top results he has achieved this season so soon in his career. I’d like to see him ride the Vuelta this year even if to abandon late in the 2nd week
 
If Van Aert is being made to look so-so, i would love your input on how Sagan, Van Avermaet, Terpstra, Naessen... are being made to look. Like they should thank the lord they still have a contract. Lol.

Philipsen i still need to see grow. Too soon to tell imho. Also, MVDP, Van Aert... Are older than Bernal.

Biggest surprise to me is Pogacar. Expected him to be good, but not this good this soon.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
If Van Aert is being made to look so-so, i would love your input on how Sagan, Van Avermaet, Terpstra, Naessen... are being made to look. Like they should thank the lord they still have a contact. Lol.

Philipsen i still need to see grow. Too soon to tell imho. Also, MVDP, Van Aert... Are older than Bernal.

Biggest surprise to me is Pogacar. Expected him to be good, but not this good this soon.
Well I wasn't that clear ... I'm a fan of Van Aert, but MVDP's exploits are eclipsing him somewhat. As a matter of fact, Sagan, Van Avermaet, Terpstra and Naessen have all looked 2nd division this year next to MVDP... not just in terms of results, but in terms of the ease with which VDP has made things look. His recovery from the crash was incredible.
 
Unfortunately Van Aert's worst performance was in RVV, which in turn was MVDP's most impressive one. For the most part, he was one of the stronger riders in reach race he entered except Omloop. He was the strongest in E3 and GW imho (stronger than MVDP in the latter even if the result says otherwise) and his comeback in PR was imho more impressive due to the fact he had to do it solo all the way. The thing is, you can't argue with results (wins). And Mathieu has those, Wout doesn't.
 
Bernal is "a little older"? He's two years mvdp's junior. 24 really isn't that young. Chris Froome is probably the only rider who got significantly better after 24.
 
Yes, it looks like a new generation is taking over. Riders from '94 and later are ready to compete in the big races:

1994 Schachmann
1994 M. A. López
1994 Politt
1994 Van Aert
1995 Van der Poel
1997 Bernal

These are even younger and will need a few more years to grow:

1997 Lambrecht
1998 Pogacar
1998 Philipsen
2000 Evenepoel

Bettiol and Alaphilippe are only slightly older, so riders of 24-27 are doing very well this spring.
 
Apart from the obvious names, Marc Hirschi is the rider who impressed me the most among the neo-pros.
Sergio Higuita has been a revelation too, although mostly in minor races.

I don't consider youngsters riders born before 1995, unless they are special cases like Van Aert, with his very limited experience on the road. I think it's completely normal that someone like Schachmann or Bettiol is hitting his prime, hence delivering great results.
 
Dec 6, 2012
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It's great time although some really old guys are always there to crash the party at its big moments. It seems that we have gone through several years without real big talents who can stand consistency test. Sagan, Dumoulin, and the Yateses might stand alone, or not even them, to stand between these great crop of <26 and the seemingly won't-go-away 33< riders.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
Also sprinters like Gaviria, Jakobsen... are still young.
De Plus, Oomen... Mas less than 25 years old.
How old is Jungels now?
26 but he is a strange case. Good enough to finish a GT in the top 10, is a contender for the cobbles and already has LBL under his belt. Not to forget an at least decent time trial. What should he focus on?
 
Higuita and Lambrecht .... yes, two more showing promise. I actually wondered whether Lambrecht would have been competitive in the front group at BP the other day if Wellens wasn't already in there. He rode away from the rest impressively enough. There have been glimmers of his talent, though he has been pressed into the service of senior riders mostly.
I must say though, I love this young crop, but I do still think it's going to be good fun seeing the stubborn old buggers duking it out with them this year.
 
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proffate said:
Bernal is "a little older"? He's two years mvdp's junior. 24 really isn't that young. Chris Froome is probably the only rider who got significantly better after 24.
It was Schachmann who I was referring to as "a little older". Poor punctuation on my part. (... "obviously Bernal" was linking him with Pogacar and Philipsen).
 
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proffate said:
Bernal is "a little older"? He's two years mvdp's junior. 24 really isn't that young. Chris Froome is probably the only rider who got significantly better after 24.
Nibali did, but he did in a way that arguably makes some sense.

Buuunch of classic riders got better after 24 too.
 
I don't think a 26 year old count as youngster. Isn't 26-34 what we consider the peak years?

25 and below is young and 35+ is an older rider. But I know that cycling is a sport that allow you to last a bit longer, so it may not be the case.
 
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Pantani_lives said:
Yes, it looks like a new generation is taking over. Riders from '94 and later are ready to compete in the big races:

1994 Schachmann
1994 M. A. López
1994 Politt
1994 Van Aert
1995 Van der Poel
1997 Bernal

These are even younger and will need a few more years to grow:

1997 Lambrecht
1998 Pogacar
1998 Philipsen
2000 Evenepoel

Bettiol and Alaphilippe are only slightly older, so riders of 24-27 are doing very well this spring.
But really, hasn't mid-20s always been the sweet spot? Sure there are always some outliers younger/older, but it's quite natural that guys that age should be in their prime. I think what's different now is that we still expect riders over 30 to still be just as good due to advances in training/nutrition/increased specialization.

What's most surprising to me about the two CX guys is that they've been able to sustain a 4-5 month peak. That's unheard of. Maybe CX is in fact ideal training for the road rather than the traditional "lay down a winter base of training rides then use early low-stakes races to build explosiveness."?
 
May 20, 2017
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Re:

hayneplane said:
Pogacar is certainly someone I could see becoming a very good rider but did not envisage him getting the top results he has achieved this season so soon in his career. I’d like to see him ride the Vuelta this year even if to abandon late in the 2nd week
Next year he goes to Vuelta
 
Re: Re:

Bolder said:
Pantani_lives said:
Yes, it looks like a new generation is taking over. Riders from '94 and later are ready to compete in the big races:

1994 Schachmann
1994 M. A. López
1994 Politt
1994 Van Aert
1995 Van der Poel
1997 Bernal

These are even younger and will need a few more years to grow:

1997 Lambrecht
1998 Pogacar
1998 Philipsen
2000 Evenepoel

Bettiol and Alaphilippe are only slightly older, so riders of 24-27 are doing very well this spring.
But really, hasn't mid-20s always been the sweet spot? Sure there are always some outliers younger/older, but it's quite natural that guys that age should be in their prime. I think what's different now is that we still expect riders over 30 to still be just as good due to advances in training/nutrition/increased specialization.

What's most surprising to me about the two CX guys is that they've been able to sustain a 4-5 month peak. That's unheard of. Maybe CX is in fact ideal training for the road rather than the traditional "lay down a winter base of training rides then use early low-stakes races to build explosiveness."?
There is research to support this. The tradition of riding a bike LSD (long slow distance) all day, everyday, all winter has been a tough habit to break, but cycling is coming around.
 
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Logic-is-your-friend said:
Classics guys usually get better towards their 30s i think. Van Avermaet, Boonen (at the expense of his sprint), Cancellara...
Also Gilbert was 28 in 2011 i think. Even Alaphilippe has grown a lot after he turned 24.
The list of riders that made a significant progress in their mid to late 20s and sometimes even in their 30s is too long to post here.
 

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