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Koronin said:
Update to the above. Not leak in the roof. Water came in where the attic vent is at. Also reset the fuse at the plug (many of our plugs have fuses) and everything in the garage is working again.
That's great news! Hope your insurance claim goes through for any other damages your house may have sustained.

Here in Eugene it's about 66F and it's trying to rain, this summer we broke a record on days without rain. Unlike the fine folk on the east coast we could really use a decent downpour right about now, the air is just foul!
 
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Tricycle Rider said:
Koronin said:
Update to the above. Not leak in the roof. Water came in where the attic vent is at. Also reset the fuse at the plug (many of our plugs have fuses) and everything in the garage is working again.
That's great news! Hope your insurance claim goes through for any other damages your house may have sustained.

Here in Eugene it's about 66F and it's trying to rain, this summer we broke a record on days without rain. Unlike the fine folk on the east coast we could really use a decent downpour right about now, the air is just foul!

We aren't going to bother with an insurance claim. Too high of a deductible with named storms. What it'll cost to fix stuff won't come close to what the deductible is.
We have another system not off the cost that is headed for us. From the looks it's just going to bring thunderstorms. Believe me, I'd be more than happy to send it to all of you on the other cost.

Yesterday and today nice and sunny to get recovery efforts started.

One interesting note is that the Food Network sent their food trucks to Wilmington to help feed people there.
 
They say that a vital way to help an economy bounce back after a disaster is to visit,spend your tourist dollars to stimulate a full,fast recovery..I can tell you that North Carolina has everything...OK maybe their surfing is So-so..but hunting,fishing,sailing,camping hiking,road biking,mountain climbing and biking are all great! If you love sailing,paddle boarding or golf...North Carolina has it...If you like mountains...this place won't disappoint...if you don't like any of those things..go to NC to eat and drink!! Good beer and spirits made in the state...
 
Charlotte, Raleigh, and Wilmington also have some really nice museums. The Seafood Festival has been postponed due to the Hurricane. It was scheduled for the first weekend of Oct, but they are moving it due to allowing for more time to recover. They are hoping to have it the first weekend of Nov.
The Battleship North Carolina is a museum in Wilmington.

However just give us a little more time to recover first as of yesterday there was still only one open route into Wilmington and that was Hwy 17 through Jacksonville. I-40 was not yet open.
 
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Koronin said:
I hope you hear from your friend soon.
He's okay. He wrote he just got internet back on after 2 weeks, they didn't suffer any damage and aren't near any floods. I had thought his internet (and maybe power) were out and that he was fine, but you never know, the images coming out of there have been terrible!
 
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dusty red roads said:
Koronin said:
I hope you hear from your friend soon.
He's okay. He wrote he just got internet back on after 2 weeks, they didn't suffer any damage and aren't near any floods. I had thought his internet (and maybe power) were out and that he was fine, but you never know, the images coming out of there have been terrible!
Glad to hear that.
 
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Unchained said:
i read today that there are still dangerous water levels on some rivers in N and S Carolina...hope it will be over soon

There is, and still flooding in some areas. Don't know how soon it will be over as it was raining here today. Did not need more rain. Really wish we could ship some of it to the west where they need it.
 
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Robert5091 said:
Hope you're doing ok Koronin.

Thanks. We've got now tropical storm Michael going through. So far so good with it. There are still tons of stuff out at the road to be picked up by clean up crews, but haven't seen those crews in the county at all. This one should be out of here sometime over night.
 
I was concerned that there was some cowboy B.S. Going on..people were told to evacuate but instead thought they "would ride it out" ..there is nothing heroic about staying behind..many people will risk life and limb to save boneheads that don't listen...
 
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Unchained said:
I was concerned that there was some cowboy B.S. Going on..people were told to evacuate but instead thought they "would ride it out" ..there is nothing heroic about staying behind..many people will risk life and limb to save boneheads that don't listen...

If there is a mandatory evacuation they don't necessarily come save you if it's too dangerous. The except to this is if a shelter becomes threatened by the hurricane, then they do come to rescue to people as they did follow the evacuation order. The reason we evacuated when Florence hit was because it was so slow moving and the amount of rain it was going to dump. We knew we'd loose power and weren't sure if we'd be able to get out of the neighborhood.
 
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Koronin said:
If there is a mandatory evacuation they don't necessarily come save you if it's too dangerous. The except to this is if a shelter becomes threatened by the hurricane, then they do come to rescue to people as they did follow the evacuation order. The reason we evacuated when Florence hit was because it was so slow moving and the amount of rain it was going to dump. We knew we'd loose power and weren't sure if we'd be able to get out of the neighborhood.
If this kind of a weather pattern were to become a regular thing, would you consider moving elsewhere?
 
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Tricycle Rider said:
Koronin said:
If there is a mandatory evacuation they don't necessarily come save you if it's too dangerous. The except to this is if a shelter becomes threatened by the hurricane, then they do come to rescue to people as they did follow the evacuation order. The reason we evacuated when Florence hit was because it was so slow moving and the amount of rain it was going to dump. We knew we'd loose power and weren't sure if we'd be able to get out of the neighborhood.
If this kind of a weather pattern were to become a regular thing, would you consider moving elsewhere?
My husband would have to be able to get a transfer and it would have to be someplace we are both willing to live. There are states in this country I will not consider living. We won't stay here when we retire, but that's at least 12 or so years away for my husband. Add another 8 or so years for me. If we can retire on just his retirement our plan is to move out of the country when he retires.
 
This afternoon my PWS on the rooftop of the house registered a peak wind of 179 km/h during a downburst generated by the passage of a large squall line. I've seen a lot of strong downbursts during summer convective thunderstorms but never something like that, for some minutes looked like to be during the passage of the eyewall of an hurricane, not far from my house the roof of a swimming pool collapsed during the event and there were damages almost everywhere in a very large area with shingles and TV aerials and dishes taken away from roofs, trees pulled down and various damages in external parts of buildings.
Near the coast was even worse with peak winds beyond 200 km/h mark in the Arcipelago island of Montecristo, but almost all Italy suffered from severe events related to the cold front that approached from western Med, I've seen photos of Terracina (in Lazio) with buildings collapsed and trees destroyed, probably there was a tornado generated by a mesocyclone, along the Adriatic Sea surfs generated by prefrontal Sirocco flooded streets and buildings near the coast and an exceptional high tide flooded more than 80% of Venice streets with the 156 cm over mean sea level registered at Punta della Salute that was the 4th highest high tide ever.
 
Here the buildings are from XI to XIV century and are rock solid, so no problem, only some water from the roof where shingles has been taken away and from the windows exposed due to the high pressure from the wind.
But I've read there are some casualties along Italy and some missing at the moment, tomorrow is another day of red alert in some areas but especially for the strong post frontal winds and high seas, the islands of Arcipelago are already isolated and a lot of harbors are flooded and closed due to high tide. The one of Rapallo I've read is also partially destroyed because the protection dam has collapsed.
 
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Re:

Nirvana said:
This afternoon my PWS on the rooftop of the house registered a peak wind of 179 km/h during a downburst generated by the passage of a large squall line. I've seen a lot of strong downbursts during summer convective thunderstorms but never something like that, for some minutes looked like to be during the passage of the eyewall of an hurricane, not far from my house the roof of a swimming pool collapsed during the event and there were damages almost everywhere in a very large area with shingles and TV aerials and dishes taken away from roofs, trees pulled down and various damages in external parts of buildings.
Near the coast was even worse with peak winds beyond 200 km/h mark in the Arcipelago island of Montecristo, but almost all Italy suffered from severe events related to the cold front that approached from western Med, I've seen photos of Terracina (in Lazio) with buildings collapsed and trees destroyed, probably there was a tornado generated by a mesocyclone, along the Adriatic Sea surfs generated by prefrontal Sirocco flooded streets and buildings near the coast and an exceptional high tide flooded more than 80% of Venice streets with the 156 cm over mean sea level registered at Punta della Salute that was the 4th highest high tide ever.
The river also started overflowing in my hometown Innichen/San Candido, we also had many landslides and the road to Cortina was closed because of a lake overflowing.
I'm in Innsbruck atm, so I was pretty worried about my family (I wasn't able to contact them on the Phone) and our house, if the river starts overflowing at the right point we could also be in trouble, but fortunately nothing big happened in my hometown, but still:
 
Yesterday post frontal Libeccio wind has hit the Riviera di Levante very rough, i've seen photos of small costal town like Portofino or Cinque Terre with boats put inside the first floors of houses from the windows. Casualities are up to 12 as far i've heard on Sky before going to work.

Anyway rain should continue to fall in the coming days for at least a week, it's what i call "trenino atlantico" with a succession of low pressure systems that enters in the Mediterranean from the ocean without pauses between them, and there is also a Balcanic blocking the prevents low pressures go away to the east.
 
Regarding roads used for cycling there a lot of damages on the Dolomites, in the TD of the Giro was already mentioned that the road of Passo Manghen that is supposed to be used in next year Giro has collapsed but reading in local press there are a lot of mountain passes with big damages, in some cases wasn't even possible to check because the road are already interrupted in the valleys and with the winter coming the priorities are toward roads needed to reach town and villages.

That one is the canyon where there was the road for Passo Fedaia that is totally removed.



 

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