Teams & Riders Alberto Contador Discussion Thread

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Jun 30, 2014
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Valv.Piti said:
Great result. I didnt watch the stage, but Rasmussen's twitter seemed to suggest he got quite a bit help by the motorbikes? :D
Let's be real, when a Movistar rider rides for gc in a Spanish stage race it's usually just the same. :D
 
Re: Re:

PremierAndrew said:
Dekker_Tifosi said:
Can't punish them for that. Motors fault for riding so close.
Didn't say they should be punished.

But in future, there should be some sort of rule similar to the one that bans you from drafting behind any riders you catch, even if the motos are too close
*** no, you know how *** that is? Then you need to slow down as a rider because some damn motor is in the way and you don't want a penalty. That could actually cost them time.

The only way forward is to organize these motors better.
 
Re: Re:

PremierAndrew said:
Dekker_Tifosi said:
Can't punish them for that. Motors fault for riding so close.
Didn't say they should be punished.

But in future, there should be some sort of rule similar to the one that bans you from drafting behind any riders you catch, even if the motos are too close
Similar to how it's the caught rider's duty to get out of the way of the catcher, it ought to be the moto's role to avoid crossing the rider's racing line.
 
"I didn't have the split times of my rivals; I covered my SRM and preferred to ride only on my sensations. I don't think it was the best time trial I have done in the last years - even recently I have done better, like my time trial at the Tour de France," said Contador.

Legend!!
 
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
 
Re:

LaFlorecita said:
"I didn't have the split times of my rivals; I covered my SRM and preferred to ride only on my sensations. I don't think it was the best time trial I have done in the last years - even recently I have done better, like my time trial at the Tour de France," said Contador.

Legend!!
Wow.

We're really at the point where attacking for the sake of glory, shits and giggles is the only thing left. He's too far off the podium, a stage win is very unlikely, and yet he's ridden completely true to his character and actually been able to animate the race.

All that's left is to enjoy it
 
Re:

LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
He better keep riding the bike regularly, cause it's dangerous if athletes like that stop too apruptly
 
Oct 6, 2009
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LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
After he sees this, Oleg will probably mail him a ham.
 
Re: Re:

gregrowlerson said:
LaFlorecita said:
Unfortunately I missed today's stage. Just caught up, I think that was quite a great performance by our Berto :) Tomorrow more!
It was indeed, but damn, it actually looked like he could win it for a moment!
I hope he reconsiders his decision this winter. I really believe he has a Giro victory left in those legs!
 
Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
He better keep riding the bike regularly, cause it's dangerous if athletes like that stop too apruptly
What are the risks? Genuine question
 
Jul 3, 2017
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Re: Re:

Amazinmets87 said:
Red Rick said:
LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
He better keep riding the bike regularly, cause it's dangerous if athletes like that stop too apruptly
What are the risks? Genuine question
They have to find something to fill the void ... often times its drugs and womanizing ... that's what happened to me
 
Re: Re:

PPAR-delta said:
Amazinmets87 said:
Red Rick said:
LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
He better keep riding the bike regularly, cause it's dangerous if athletes like that stop too apruptly
What are the risks? Genuine question
They have to find something to fill the void ... often times its drugs and womanizing ... that's what happened to me
Ah, makes sense. I thought he was referring to adverse health effects due to a sedentary state.
 
Sep 3, 2017
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Pantani_lives said:
It's not very likely, but a stage win would be a superb finish to his career. If he attacks at the foot of the climb of Las Machucos or the Angliru, maybe the other GC riders won't immediately react.
AC wants to remember for something out of ordinary a think a stage win or a podium are not out of ordinary , i think that in is mind he wants to decide the winner of la vuelta
 
Re: Re:

Amazinmets87 said:
Red Rick said:
LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
He better keep riding the bike regularly, cause it's dangerous if athletes like that stop too apruptly
What are the risks? Genuine question
I think it was associaterd with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death - heart attack, but I can't find a source for it now. I think the risk had to do with them having very low resting heart rates and then stopping the regular stimulus for increasing the heart rate could lead to the sympathetic nervous system to give too few impulses which would cause the heart to beat dangerously slow or even stop.
 
Jul 11, 2009
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Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
Amazinmets87 said:
Red Rick said:
LaFlorecita said:
https://cyclingtips.com/2017/09/contador-retirement-ill-gain-weight-youll-make-jokes/

Once the race roars into the streets of Madrid and crosses the finish line, it’s all over.

He’s given what comes next some thought, and seems to appreciate the freedom he will have.

“The first days after retiring, there won’t be much peace. I certainly won’t get on the bike,” he said. “I’ll go and have breakfast where I usually go. At the weekend I’ll be at the Giro presentation in Israel, but it will be more relaxed. Every morning without looking at the scales, neither at night nor in the morning. I’ll be able to eat ‘jamón con tocino’ in the morning. My life will be normal, without crossing the demands and slavery of top level cycling.”

With that approach, he knows that his life – and his body – will change. He’s been an athlete for a long time and says that he accepts that things will be different. That may take some getting used to, but he says he is fine with it.

“I like slim fit clothes, so I may have to change my wardrobe,” he smiled. “The people around me are already working on it. I’ll be doing a lot of sport, not just cycling.

“I’ll gain weight, you’ll make jokes about it when you see me…but I’ll try to keep it under control.”
He will go the Purito way :eek: :lol: :)
He better keep riding the bike regularly, cause it's dangerous if athletes like that stop too apruptly
What are the risks? Genuine question
I think it was associaterd with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death - heart attack, but I can't find a source for it now. I think the risk had to do with them having very low resting heart rates and then stopping the regular stimulus for increasing the heart rate could lead to the sympathetic nervous system to give too few impulses which would cause the heart to beat dangerously slow or even stop.
Yes I remember Indurain having to train still, just gradually tapering it off
 
Re: Re:

Red Rick said:
I think it was associaterd with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death - heart attack, but I can't find a source for it now. I think the risk had to do with them having very low resting heart rates and then stopping the regular stimulus for increasing the heart rate could lead to the sympathetic nervous system to give too few impulses which would cause the heart to beat dangerously slow or even stop.
that's what they say, but surely someone in his inner circle knows this. I don't think we have to worry about him :)
And he says he will do many different sports anyway, don't think he plans to sit still for the next few years.
 
Jul 6, 2016
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Re: Re:

LaFlorecita said:
Red Rick said:
I think it was associaterd with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death - heart attack, but I can't find a source for it now. I think the risk had to do with them having very low resting heart rates and then stopping the regular stimulus for increasing the heart rate could lead to the sympathetic nervous system to give too few impulses which would cause the heart to beat dangerously slow or even stop.
that's what they say, but surely someone in his inner circle knows this. I don't think we have to worry about him :)
And he says he will do many different sports anyway, don't think he plans to sit still for the next few years.
Would be lovely to see him getting involved in some minor sport as well. Cyclocross for example. Going crazy in a big winter jacket rooting for his guys somewhere in a Belgian forest :D.
 

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