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Are you a Vegetarian?

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Jun 16, 2009
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Tapeworm said:
A few points:-
1. If you had never eaten meat would you ever get a craving for it? (I know I haven't, lifelong vege here, n=1 so far)

2. Calorie intake from non-meat sources is actually one of the key points to rising obesity levels etc, highly refined sources such as high fructose corn syrup etc. So a claim that is hard to meet calorific intake is incorrect. Try getting enough carbs from meat alone!

3. Yes a balanced diet is best. Its just that is doens't HAVE to include meat or animal products. But if it does then so be it.

I defintely give u #1, although maybe vegans crave something and are not sure how to identify it. Possible.

#2 I was referring to another posters comments about plant based food.
I guess technically highly processed foods can be plant based such as high fructose corn syrup. But as the original comment was in regards to the vast amount of fiber involved i really can't give you #2 sorry.

#3. Balance, great we agree. I think you would have a hard time getting your heme iron without meat. Most vegans & vegetarians that i know have a very anemic look to their complexion. I am not saying you cannot be healthy without animal products, If you can more power to you.
 
May 18, 2009
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runninboy said:
#3. Balance, great we agree. I think you would have a hard time getting your heme iron without meat. Most vegans & vegetarians that i know have a very anemic look to their complexion. I am not saying you cannot be healthy without animal products, If you can more power to you.

what is it with people saying that veg diet doesn't provide enough iron? i'm veg, do north of 600km a week and have never had a problem with iron levels (have them tested regularly). however i know several people who aren't veg, do less kms then me, and have had trouble with their iron levels. So long as you eat a balanced diet it will provide what you need, veg or not.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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runninboy said:
I defintely give u #1, although maybe vegans crave something and are not sure how to identify it. Possible.

#2 I was referring to another posters comments about plant based food.
I guess technically highly processed foods can be plant based such as high fructose corn syrup. But as the original comment was in regards to the vast amount of fiber involved i really can't give you #2 sorry.

#3. Balance, great we agree. I think you would have a hard time getting your heme iron without meat. Most vegans & vegetarians that i know have a very anemic look to their complexion. I am not saying you cannot be healthy without animal products, If you can more power to you.

Point 2. Wheat, rice, potatoes, barely, rye etc? Not enough carbs there??

Point 3. Meat IS without arguement the easiest place to find iron. No question. But by far not the only sorce and maybe not the healthiest (from a holistic
POV). There is no doubt that with correct diet iron levels can easiely be maintained. Once again just using myself as an example my iron levels have never dipped to a low level. Females do have it harder though. Whilst the vege thing may still be a novelty in the West in Eastern culture there are some that have been that way for a looong time. Can't be that bad then...
 
Jul 21, 2009
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runninboy said:
Just a quick answer, No we make no profit on the cows. Hope that doesn't offend you. My family does not raise the cattle to make money, they actually are more like a natural weed control system to eliminate the use of pesticide. Kind of hard to keep the weeds down on 1000 acres but 160 cows do it just fine, in case you don't know in rural areas there is a weed commissionar and if your land is not managed properly you will be fined heavily. To answer the question you haven't asked, we make money on the land itself which has appreciated over time, and we rent as well.
The natural life span of cattle is closer to 17 years and yes all our cows live out their entire lives(bovine lawnmower remember?) It is sad when they pass on, but they have been well cared for, much better than if left to their own devices. Pink eye would render many blind, the young calves & heifers have to be seperated otherwise too much inbreeding & disease would result. As well as proper breeding techniques, we have never had a cow die giving birth, in over 30 years! But it is quite prevalent in the wild, the dominant bull breeds more, he is usually bigger which means his calves are bigger and heifers would die trying to give birth to his calves.

I could go on and on and i already have. I am sorry you are blinded by so much misinformation. I have heard alot of strange things about vegetarians as well. One thing that always puzzled me, when they are so repulsed by the thought of eating flesh and yet they spend so much time trying to replicate it artificially with vegetables.
Why try to shape tofu into something that is so vile, like a hamburger?
crazy:D

Oh btw I have a "don't ask don't tell" religious policy with the cattle so i have no idea what they consider sacred.

You're totally missing the point. You breed the cattle for your own purpose and use correct? You don't need to answer that..it's YES. Without the cattle you actually make no profit off the land. Enough said on that topic!

I'm well informed thank you. There are not too many people who are born vegan and many of us made the change later in life and when making that change it could be easier to eat/see things that resemble food we grew up with, pretty normal I believe.
To form a veggie burger out of tofu or grains or rice into something that resembles a burger made of dead cow(yes dead cow ...why call it beef? call it what it is!) is simply something we are used to eating in that form...not that we crave the taste of animal flesh nor do we want it to taste similar to that. Hey it's easier to put between to pieces of bread! Personally I'm not into eating soy textured protein made into a shape of a chicken leg...to each his own on that. Here's something to puzzle you...why are pigs called pork? why are cows/cattle called beef and their parts cut up for human consumption called streak...then broken down further..top sirloin, etc..and chickens..labeled as poultry by the industry but somehow calling a dead chicken just a plain old roasted chicken or fired chicken is acceptable. All this is done to desensitize us humans from the reality of what they are really consuming and hoping they don't give it a second thought. I'll close with this...The point is...and so many miss this point. We can eat things that look similar, might even taste similar but we're getting that taste/nutrition without the exploitation of other sentient beings. That is what really forms the basis of veganism. Your choice to not believe in that lifestyle or not but you can't argue that it's not the most compassionate, environmentally friendly way to live your life on this planet. I'm not out to convert, just stating my opinion as others have and educating the blissfully ignoramuses. :D
 
veganomics said:
You're totally missing the point. You breed the cattle for your own purpose and use correct? You don't need to answer that..it's YES. Without the cattle you actually make no profit off the land. Enough said on that topic!

I'm well informed thank you. There are not too many people who are born vegan and many of us made the change later in life and when making that change it could be easier to eat/see things that resemble food we grew up with, pretty normal I believe.
To form a veggie burger out of tofu or grains or rice into something that resembles a burger made of dead cow(yes dead cow ...why call it beef? call it what it is!) is simply something we are used to eating in that form...not that we crave the taste of animal flesh nor do we want it to taste similar to that. Hey it's easier to put between to pieces of bread! Personally I'm not into eating soy textured protein made into a shape of a chicken leg...to each his own on that. Here's something to puzzle you...why are pigs called pork? why are cows/cattle called beef and their parts cut up for human consumption called streak...then broken down further..top sirloin, etc..and chickens..labeled as poultry by the industry but somehow calling a dead chicken just a plain old roasted chicken or fired chicken is acceptable. All this is done to desensitize us humans from the reality of what they are really consuming and hoping they don't give it a second thought. I'll close with this...The point is...and so many miss this point. We can eat things that look similar, might even taste similar but we're getting that taste/nutrition without the exploitation of other sentient beings. That is what really forms the basis of veganism. Your choice to not believe in that lifestyle or not but you can't argue that it's not the most compassionate, environmentally friendly way to live your life on this planet. I'm not out to convert, just stating my opinion as others have and educating the blissfully ignoramuses. :D

however well intentioned, you come off as a blowhard. bigtime.:cool:
 
Jul 29, 2009
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veganomics said:
Here's something to puzzle you...why are pigs called pork? why are cows/cattle called beef and their parts cut up for human consumption called streak...then broken down further..top sirloin, etc..and chickens..labeled as poultry by the industry but somehow calling a dead chicken just a plain old roasted chicken or fired chicken is acceptable. All this is done to desensitize us humans from the reality of what they are really consuming and hoping they don't give it a second thought.

Um, no. Historically, it's a class issue. Invariably the "desensitizing" names come from the French, which the Normans ate and passed the language on. I suspect you are reading more of a conspiracy here than actually exists.

The other side of this conversation, of course, which applies to both sides of the debate is WHERE our food comes from. For those with a political justification (I was going to say "beef" :D) for vegetarianism/veganism and even for those who eat meat but are conscious of avoiding chemicals in their food, etc., the distance our food travels is a big, big issue...
 
Sep 5, 2009
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Hi ,

I'm fully vegetarian. Vegetarian protein, although sometimes overlooked, is an excellent source for athletes to enhance their performance, complement a vigorous training program and help promote swift post-workout recovery. In addition, vegetarian protein does not include excess calories from fat or any toxic residues.


Reasons for Athletes to Choose Vegetarian Protein :


Naturally occurring enzymes present only in vegetarian protein are assimilated and used by the body far more efficiently than processed or animal proteins. The quicker nutrients can be extracted from food, the sooner the waste can be eliminated and the faster you can experience optimal athletic performance. Vegetarian protein has a higher pH than many animal proteins. Athletes in peak training are the most affected by the build up of lactic acid in the body. By consuming alkalizing vegetarian protein this will help restore pH balances, and promote the regeneration and repair process that takes place during the resting phase after exercise. Hemp, for example, is one of the best sources of protein. It is alkalizing and packed full of nutrients.

Best Vegetarian Protein Sources For Athletes:

Vegetarian athletes can easily attain sufficient amounts of protein in their diet through a variety of plant-based protein foods. The generally accepted standard is 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight for athletes and 1.5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight for bodybuilders. Some excellent vegetarian protein sources are soy, tempeh, beans, nuts, legumes, hemp, grains, milk, yogurt, cheese, peanut butter, eggs, protein powders and protein bars. These food choices can be modified to accommodate all types of vegetarian diets.

Tips for Vegetarian Athletes:

Vegetarian protein provides the healthiest form of fat for our body. You can get sufficient amounts of fat from eating whole grains, beans and small amounts of nuts, seeds and oils. Just because vegetarian athletes choose not to eat animal protein does not mean they need to eat more protein. Too much protein may cause osteoporosis, kidney disease or calcium stones, although this is more of a concern with high-fat dairy or animal protein. Vegetarian athletes should closely monitor their levels of iron, zinc, and B12, to maintain the highest possible training levels. In addition, all athletes need to follow a well-balanced diet with adequate portions of energy, carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, and minerals to achieve optimal performance.

Hope, this may help. :)
 
Jul 24, 2009
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A couple of things I'd like to expand on ingridseynhaeve.

1/ The body wants the amino acids from proteins, proteins are too big to be absorbed (except in rare cases). Proteins (including enzymes) have to be broken down, by the digestive system, into their component amino acids before being absorbed. (And cooking denatures many proteins allowing them to be digested more easily.)

2/ Another advantage of a high-pH diet is that it spares bone calcium. Acid forming foods (all meat+dairy and many legumes) can cause calcium to be taken from bones to be used to buffer the blood.

3/ All athletes should ideally have their blood tested at least once a season, not just vegetarians/vegans. (The China Study points out that Chinese people eating whole-foods, mostly-plant-based diets have better blood stats for Iron and Hb than those who eat a lot of meat.)
 
Sep 15, 2009
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Hi everybody,

I am a Vegetarian. I know that body needs different kinds of ingredients,that might be easily available in non-vege, but we can find them also in Vegetable.

Killing some one(life) for our food, is just not needed either.So I go for VEGETABLES.
 
Apr 12, 2009
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I am a meat eater, and you guys can say whatever you want, but nothing is better than having a barbecue during the tour de france with other cycling enthusiast. On a health standpoint sure eating being a vegetarian means that you are probably less prone to heart disease and hypertension, but from what I understand and I could be wrong but my cousin is a vegetarian and he tends to overeat. Also to the guy who says he was born a vegetarian that's bull****, you parents probably force fed you into being vegan, you were probably jealous about the kid eating the ham sandwich at school when you were a kid.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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franciep10 said:
I am a meat eater, and you guys can say whatever you want, but nothing is better than having a barbecue during the tour de france with other cycling enthusiast. On a health standpoint sure eating being a vegetarian means that you are probably less prone to heart disease and hypertension, but from what I understand and I could be wrong but my cousin is a vegetarian and he tends to overeat. Also to the guy who says he was born a vegetarian that's bull****, you parents probably force fed you into being vegan, you were probably jealous about the kid eating the ham sandwich at school when you were a kid.

Not sure how you call the being born vego BS? You are no more born a vego than you are a carnivour, ie: product of your environment.
As a child, the smell of meat, especially cooking meat, made me (and still makes me) feel ill. The only animal product I ever craved as a child was jelly (with ice-cream of course).

Overeating is a psychological issue and not tied to your diet per se.

As for the barbeque, I love BBQs, usually have a couple a month in summer time, the Tour Down Under here in Oz is perfect timing for example. Of course its soy sausages on the BBQ but the rest is the same.
 
Tapeworm said:
Not sure how you call the being born vego BS? You are no more born a vego than you are a carnivour, ie: product of your environment.

All humans are born as Omnivores so you cannot be born a vegetarian. We all have teeth designed to rip flesh and grind grain. That being said you cannot be born a carnivour either.

My diet is for most days vegetarian as it is my girlfriend who does the cooking. Every five weeks or so I need to eat red meat (dead cow) because I'm tired and weak, my body is telling me I need it. Yes your body can "tell" you what you need to eat. Some people can go without eating "dead animal" (kills me everytime) but that's not for everyone. Not everyone has the same nutritional needs because we are all different (like snowflakes).

And those of you thinking that I feel weak and tired because I don't have a well rounded diet, trust me you are wrong. I eat everything under the sun and plenty of it, so that is definitely not the problem.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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US Patent Exploding Cyclist said:
All humans are born as Omnivores so you cannot be born a vegetarian. We all have teeth designed to rip flesh and grind grain. That being said you cannot be born a carnivour either.

My diet is for most days vegetarian as it is my girlfriend who does the cooking. Every five weeks or so I need to eat red meat (dead cow) because I'm tired and weak, my body is telling me I need it. Yes your body can "tell" you what you need to eat. Some people can go without eating "dead animal" (kills me everytime) but that's not for everyone. Not everyone has the same nutritional needs because we are all different (like snowflakes).

And those of you thinking that I feel weak and tired because I don't have a well rounded diet, trust me you are wrong. I eat everything under the sun and plenty of it, so that is definitely not the problem.

I think you will find it is your mind that controls cravings. Have you ever craved a food you have never eaten? And if you are feeling weak and only meat can "fix it" would either indicate a pyschological requirement and/or your diet isn't as complete as you think (ever had tests at the time to confim or not whether you are lacking anything)? Peoples idea of a good diet is somewhat subjective.
 
A

Anonymous

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veg vs non-veg

I have been a vegetarian since April 1980. Since then I have never had any nutrition related medical problems. I remember after one physical the Dr who did not know I was a vegetarian said, "At least you don't have to worry about being anemic." I have always been able to exercise without problems, hiking, swiming and cycling. I average 2500 - 3000 miles per year on the bike. Anyone who chooses can get all the nutrition they need to lead a healthy, active, athletic life and never eat a bit of animal. Don't worry, be happy. It is your choice.

It is a pity. I have seen the "vegetarian / non-vegetarian" topic appear on several forums and the discussion always seems to polarize and degenerate into two extremes. On one side is the "I love meat - born carnivors - plants are alive too" stupidity. On the other is the shrill (and pointless) preaching of the "10 pounds of plant protein makes one pound of meat - animal cruelty - we're destroying the planet" crowd.

It is a pity because what we eat and our place in the food chain are important topics. Choosing sides and screaming at each other does not advance the discussion. Just a few comments then I'm outa here.

"Veganism" is not a diet. It is an ethical philosophy similar to the Hindu concept of "ahimsa" which roughly translates as "non-violenece to living creatures". The main expression of "veganism" is dietary because for most humans their diets are violent towards living creatures. Wearing leather shoes and wool caps are also part of "veganism" and have nothing to do with diet.

Nature vs Nuture. The several billion humans on planet earth do what they do, believe what they believe and eat what they eat for one reason, for the most part. That is what they-we learn from the time they-we are born. Christians are Christians and Hindus are Hindus because their parents were. I ate meat for the first 30 years of my life, because that's what I was taught to do. I have also known many Hindus who have never eaten meat because that is what they were taught from birth. The point is that we have the choice to eat animals or not eat animals. There is no physical requirement to do so.

Penultimate: Being a vegetarian does not convey moral superiority any more than being a "right-to-lifer" does. I always taught my daughter, "Your grandma eats meat but that doesn't make her bad. It just means she eats meat." There are good vegetariians and bad vegetarians, Adolf Hitler being an example of the bad ones.

Last: Learn more, get smarter decide for yourself what you will do. Amen
 
Apr 12, 2009
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Tapeworm said:
Not sure how you call the being born vego BS? You are no more born a vego than you are a carnivour, ie: product of your environment.
As a child, the smell of meat, especially cooking meat, made me (and still makes me) feel ill. The only animal product I ever craved as a child was jelly (with ice-cream of course).

Overeating is a psychological issue and not tied to your diet per se.

As for the barbeque, I love BBQs, usually have a couple a month in summer time, the Tour Down Under here in Oz is perfect timing for example. Of course its soy sausages on the BBQ but the rest is the same.

Hey it's your choice, I happen to like the smell of meat. You still don't get the point, nobody is born vegan or carnivore or omnivore, the fact is we as kids eat what our parents eat, if your parents ate meat then you made a choice later on in your life.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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franciep10 said:
Hey it's your choice, I happen to like the smell of meat. You still don't get the point, nobody is born vegan or carnivore or omnivore, the fact is we as kids eat what our parents eat, if your parents ate meat then you made a choice later on in your life.

Hmmm I think I stated...

Tapeworm said:
You are no more born a vego than you are a carnivour, ie: product of your environment...

Which means we are making the same point, no?
 
Apr 12, 2009
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Tapeworm said:
Hmmm I think I stated...

Which means we are making the same point, no?

Because the guy who said he was born a vegetarian, I said that's BS. You said it's not BS. Now it sounds like we're making the same point but arguing over who's right.
 
Jul 21, 2009
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Steampunk said:
Um, no. Historically, it's a class issue. Invariably the "desensitizing" names come from the French, which the Normans ate and passed the language on. I suspect you are reading more of a conspiracy here than actually exists.

The other side of this conversation, of course, which applies to both sides of the debate is WHERE our food comes from. For those with a political justification (I was going to say "beef" :D) for vegetarianism/veganism and even for those who eat meat but are conscious of avoiding chemicals in their food, etc., the distance our food travels is a big, big issue...

Good thing for Wikipedia! :)
 
Sep 26, 2009
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Yes i am a vegetarian. And truely speaking i feel really light in weight. Moreover my stamina has increased to a great extent. Due to that i am able to work for long hours daily without getting worn out.
 
Jul 4, 2009
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I am not a vegetarian, but my partner (who I have lived with for many years) is. This means that at home I generally eat a meat free diet, although I might have the occasional bit of ham on a sandwich or some form of meat when we eat out. She has high blood iron levels. I have low blood iron levels. I take iron supplements, but still whenever I go to give blood I am told that my levels are right on the borderline, and if they drop any more at all I will not be able to give blood. I generally eat a lot, by the way.

I have noticed a distinct trend in my performance when racing as related to steak. If I eat steak before the race, I tend to win. I am not sure why, I don't know if it is a blood iron effect, psychological or pure co-incidence. I first noticed it during a stage race, having suffered through the morning stage I had a couple of steak sandwiches for lunch, and won the afternoon stage (which must have finished about 4 hours after my last sandwich). The same has happened with eating steak the night before. Since then I won or placed each time I ate steak, about seven times (plus one win after no steak for a while, and several losses after no steak). I was going to do more testing, but tore my knee to pieces and have barely raced for a year. I did ride (not race, ride, you can check it out on my web page, http://www.tourletour.com) the Tour de France this year though, and doing a couple of hundred km per day for three weeks I was craving (and eating) a lot of meat. I have done two races since getting back on the bike, one (a stage race) I ate meat through, and the other I didn't. I didn't come close to winning either of them.

So the summary is that despite a diet that is usually fairly low in meat I have never noticed any ill effects, but think I have noticed positives. When I am back to racing fitness, steak will probably be part of my race preparation.
 

juanaracena

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Nov 13, 2009
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I was a very strict vegan then went to some meats like chicken and turkey for protien because i got into body building. But i'm no longer into that and have been doing competitive cycling for 5 years. I have a big problem with comsuming enough protien per day. I'm more of a vegan then a carnavor.
No problem here with power output. Vegan is the way to go.

Question.... I noticed that many of you eat 'peanut butter" everyday. Isn't that too fatty??
 

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