Coronavirus: How dangerous a threat?

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Even heart disease in women was played down for much too long but now it gets much more attention. But it seems that some diseases get the right people involved in their public health campaigns while others don't. Parkinsons is much more widely known now than it used to be thanks to smart campaigns and more money spent on education. I don't know how diseases like diabetes and Alzheimers can be played down considering the numbers of people they effect. Some of it has to do with public perceptions and misinformation.
Not to get too far off here, but breast cancer gets proportionately more public attention than more deadly cancers (I think that breast is 4 or 5 on the list for women and 9 or 10 for men). Like you said, breast cancer has gotten the right people behind it.
 
Realistically enlisted folks would know they have volunteered to give up their life for their country. Objecting to the "science" of every infection, plague or allergy they'd get would seem petty enough for a discharge or court-martial. It's the basic spirit of the service.
That said there have always been polarized elements in every country's military I'd guess. Regional, racial, religious and political differences wouldn't go away solely from a unified enemy force. IMO the current polarized climate has given more publicity to any objections to military, school and business life. Sadly, the US is certainly not the only country under pressure.
I think your comments are spot on for the majority who enlist or get a commission to serve I think that there is a underlying mental acceptance..I may have to give up everything.
For me,I was already a civilian contractor,temp assigned to Fort Knox, living in a rental house in Doe Valley,when I was told to pack my bag..could be,but luckily not going to a combat zone.
But Covid opened eyes to many, my nephew working in a Scottsdale Safeway,suddenly getting risk pay..before he was 18..people who process food,meat..suddenly in a combat zone..and in California..I still never completely wrapped my head around the criteria for essential worker designation.
I was able to cross from US and back and forth to Mexico because my boss wrote I was essential on a single sheet of company letterhead paper..was able to cross military check points in Mexico w a U.S. Issued Covid vaccine card and my utility bills from my Mexican residence.
And lots of food service workers were deemed essential..so if you are making grub..don't know if those folks start with the same set of mental parameters as someone signing up for military service..but it happened..and the people cleaning floors and bathrooms at hospitals most likely didn't classify themselves in a ultra high risk job,but the designation came almost overnight..seeing the over the top beyond complicated formulas..death,function,economic loss, infrastructure, emergency response,ect,ect,ect x100..there certainly never was not 1 size..what works in New Zealand doesn't work in New York City and what works in Lake Tahoe doesn't,couldn't work in dozens of urban Chinese cities..if you read a little..you see that apples to oranges comparisons are pretty common.
Dirts point about broadening immunity is lost on most, even though we live the model through things like supplements influenza for decades..you have some broad immunity..scientists guess on a strain for vaccination and given a mountain of variables..you can still end up getting the flu..the reaction to the exact same science from Covid..has been nothing short of dumbfounding..
And the US turns the sad corner of a million dead any day now
 
How many dead due to obesity alone in the US? I'm not sure the number is kept specifically but according to one report I have quoted for 1990 : obesity and unhealthy diet alone kills aprox 300 - 500 thousand a year.

According to the cdc US obesity prevalence increased from 30.5% to 42.4% so those death rates have gone up. Over 3 normal years no pandemic obesity is killing close to if not more than a million.

"Mass media,5-8 scholarly journals,9-11 and pharmaceutical handouts12 have cited 300,000 deaths per year in the United States as being attributable to obesity, a number that may have been adapted from an analysis of precursors of premature death in the United States for 1980,13 attributing 289,502 deaths to "overnutrition." McGinnis and Foege14 estimated that, of US deaths in 1990, 309,000 to 582,000 were associated with unhealthy diet and exercise patterns."

No one will quote those numbers in public why is that? But I cringe when reading for months on the pandemic topic about how the US is going to eclipse the million number. In my opinion the optics is cheering on death without true context AKA looking for someone to blame.
 
How many dead due to obesity alone in the US? I'm not sure the number is kept specifically but according to one report I have quoted for 1990 : obesity and unhealthy diet alone kills aprox 300 - 500 thousand a year.

According to the cdc US obesity prevalence increased from 30.5% to 42.4% so those death rates have gone up. Over 3 normal years no pandemic obesity is killing close to if not more than a million.

"Mass media,5-8 scholarly journals,9-11 and pharmaceutical handouts12 have cited 300,000 deaths per year in the United States as being attributable to obesity, a number that may have been adapted from an analysis of precursors of premature death in the United States for 1980,13 attributing 289,502 deaths to "overnutrition." McGinnis and Foege14 estimated that, of US deaths in 1990, 309,000 to 582,000 were associated with unhealthy diet and exercise patterns."

No one will quote those numbers in public why is that? But I cringe when reading for months on the pandemic topic about how the US is going to eclipse the million number. In my opinion the optics is cheering on death without true context AKA looking for someone to blame.
When it comes to obesity there is clearly now some mixed messaging, that IMO has the potential to contribute to confusion and less pursuit of personal health. Certainly there are those that suffer from contributing medical conditions and resulting health issues but the movement to reduce social pressure for "body image" should not be at the expense of encouraging people to try eat and to be healthy. If people willingly destroy their health as an indulgence they have to accept the blame whether it's food, environment or behavior. We can agree, I think?
 
Not to get too far off here, but breast cancer gets proportionately more public attention than more deadly cancers (I think that breast is 4 or 5 on the list for women and 9 or 10 for men). Like you said, breast cancer has gotten the right people behind it.
I guess breast cancer is the most common cancer in women like prostate cancer for men but both of them are very treatable. Same with asthma compared to something like emphysema. The research dollars flow more to the common conditions.
 
I guess breast cancer is the most common cancer in women like prostate cancer for men but both of them are very treatable. Same with asthma compared to something like emphysema. The research dollars flow more to the common conditions.
I agree with that, but I was referring more to the public activity (always on the news, breast cancer events every month etc...). Not that that is a bad thing though.
 
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When it comes to obesity there is clearly now some mixed messaging, that IMO has the potential to contribute to confusion and less pursuit of personal health. Certainly there are those that suffer from contributing medical conditions and resulting health issues but the movement to reduce social pressure for "body image" should not be at the expense of encouraging people to try eat and to be healthy. If people willingly destroy their health as an indulgence they have to accept the blame whether it's food, environment or behavior. We can agree, I think?
Yes I agree with you on this.
 
Has any state in the USA required vaccination for anyone but health care workers?

EDIT: TN doesn't even have a mandate for healthcare workers.
This begs the question....what exactly required vaccination in TN. I doubt they had any mandate, so the whole point is mostly moot.
Like Idaho the spread out population made avoidance of vaccination and mask mandates acceptable. That lack of initiatives is, ironically; campaign strong points in primary election media here.
 
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Has any state in the USA required vaccination for anyone but health care workers?

EDIT: TN doesn't even have a mandate for healthcare workers.
What about the universities & colleges? Most of the state & local colleges here in Colorado required vaccination with a testing opt out:


Tennessee type legislation would allow those students & staff that decline vaccination, and have natural immunity, such as my son, to no longer be subjected to testing.
 
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As a private university, why shouldn't they be able to set the rules for attending or teaching at their college?
Gov Lee shares your same sentiments in a letter stating he's allowing the bill to become law without his signature (the bill had more than 2/3 majority to override any veto by the governor).

But this is a fundamental principle that natural immunity is at least as good as the immunity derived from vaccination. The bill reads as follows:

"The immune protection gained from a prior COVID-19 infection is at least as protective against COVID-19 as a COVID-19 vaccine. There is, therefore, no rational basis to treat individuals who have had a previous COVID-19 infection differently than individuals who have received a COVID-19 vaccine."


So, if we "follow the science" and recognize natural immunity on par with vaccine immunity, wouldn't it be discrimination that a private business, educational institution, etc., would not treat the naturally immune the same as the vaccinated when it comes to their Covid policies.
 
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You do realize that the same point can be made with respect to state to state. institution to institution . It really is a free society. Open up and embrace it.
You two are arguing the affirmative in both instances on this count. Glad you agree! An employer should be able to set the rules as well as an institution. The trip up is for employees or students that are already in their system.
As for State to State there are conditions of National Emergency that exceed state authority, right?

Now suggesting the Tenn legislature "followed the science" while passing a law where the law equates the immunity is speculation at best. A good portion of those legislators would respond politically to simple questions like: "how old is the earth" and " is it flat"? See how far they "follow the science" then.
The white lab coats at the hearings was a good, professional touch, though.
 
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You do realize that the same point can be made with respect to state to state. institution to institution . It really is a free society. Open up and embrace it.
Lol. I don't disagree. We have the freedom to move or quit jobs or school out of principle. What you seem to want is complete freedom from consequence.
Gov Lee shares your same sentiments in a letter stating he's allowing the bill to become law without his signature (the bill had more than 2/3 majority to override any veto by the governor).

But this is a fundamental principle that natural immunity is at least as good as the immunity derived from vaccination. The bill reads as follows:

"The immune protection gained from a prior COVID-19 infection is at least as protective against COVID-19 as a COVID-19 vaccine. There is, therefore, no rational basis to treat individuals who have had a previous COVID-19 infection differently than individuals who have received a COVID-19 vaccine."


So, if we "follow the science" and recognize natural immunity on par with vaccine immunity, wouldn't it be discrimination that a private business, educational institution, etc., would not treat the naturally immune the same as the vaccinated when it comes to their Covid policies.
The problem is that infection is not always on par with vaccination. Especially if we add boosters. If they wanted to base immunity based on antibody titers, that would be a more valid criteria.
You two are arguing the affirmative in both instances on this count. Glad you agree! An employer should be able to set the rules as well as an institution. The trip up is for employees or students that are already in their system.
As for State to State there are conditions of National Emergency that exceed state authority, right?

Now suggesting the Tenn legislature "followed the science" while passing a law where the law equates the immunity is speculation at best. A good portion of those legislators would respond politically to simple questions like: "how old is the earth" and " is it flat"? See how far they "follow the science" then.
The white lab coats at the hearings was a good, professional touch, though.
Exactly. Institutions should decide. But iron wants to pretend that I want compulsory vaccination.
 
Hong Kong researchers have found that the best protection against COVID is one vaccination and acquiring infection . It''s the same group of researchers who correctly forecast the severity of the Omnicron variant.
Some English researchers are saying two vaccinations and two boosters with the second booster 6 months after the first one..............I know of quite a few people that have had one booster then got infected. None of them needed hospital and all were fine after a a week or so.
 
Some English researchers are saying two vaccinations and two boosters with the second booster 6 months after the first one..............I know of quite a few people that have had one booster then got infected. None of them needed hospital and all were fine after a a week or so.
I should have clarified the research compared this to Two Vaccinations and a booster.
 

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