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Doping in other sports?

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BullsFan22 said:
http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/14768114/jenrry-mejia-new-york-mets-suspended-permanently-mlb-third-positive-ped-test

Why wouldn't they give him a fourth chance!?! Everyone deserves a fourth chance!!!
Interesting case, being as he is/was a pitcher. When discussing doping in cricket, I notice the bowlers rarely get mentioned. But i think bowlers/pitchers benefit from the recovery boost of steroids as much as batsmen/batters benefit from the added musculature, especially the speed bowlers. It always struck me as quite suspicious that Nolan Ryan and Randy Johnson both were routinely throwing 95mph/150kph well into their 40s.

To borrow a phrase from history's most lionised drug smuggler, ..."Not normal."
 
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Theye'd hardly be so brazen, but on SKY live coverage, Vardy pops a pill 30 seconds before kickoff. Full head shot.

Probably caffeine. Maybe painkiller. But what painkiller and is that the topup pill? Third, fourth?

If i was still on twitter i'd tweet him and ask.
 
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StyrbjornSterki said:
To borrow a phrase from history's most lionised drug smuggler, ..."Not normal."
StybjornSterki who is this ?

if you watch a bit of cricket, I think the Australian commentary team talked about Ryan Harris aka Ryno, Rhino... whatever... he was a mediocre all rounder in one-days. He came back as a fast medium bowler, could hit the radar gun at 150, and the commentary team made coded references to his "new physique". But I reckon they are all on it. See the difference between Patrick Cummins at 18 bowling 140 odd, pretty fast for a young kid, then his current physique, and him breaking down every second week. it is cjc peptides surely.
 
May 26, 2010
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gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
The attitude in some amateur sports beggars belief

http://www.irishtimes.com/sport/gaelic-games/seán-cavanagh-says-blood-tests-may-catch-out-innocent-players-1.2537205?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

"Seán Cavanagh says blood tests may catch out innocent players".......

How so?

He's probably right from an educational point of view.

And yes, amateur is an important point in this.

Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.
 
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Benotti69 said:
Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Like the Monaghan player?

I'm currently on a prescription for Prednisolone. How many of them would know that is banned?

Education is a key aspect. The onus is on the GAA and the Irish Sports Council.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.

Never said there was no doping.

I agree with the testing on matchday and training but not out of competition with players having daily jobs and education to attend to.
 
May 26, 2010
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gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Like the Monaghan player?

I'm currently on a prescription for Prednisolone. How many of them would know that is banned?

Education is a key aspect. The onus is on the GAA and the Irish Sports Council.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.

Never said there was no doping.

I agree with the testing on matchday and training but not out of competition with players having daily jobs and education to attend to.

I dont think it is hard to check with your pharmacist whether something contains a banned substance according to WADA or whatever code the GAA 'adhere' too. My guess is there is an app for the WADA code and you type in the name of your medicine and it comes up clean or 'dirty'.

As for OOC testing re education and jobs, it never stopped players getting time off work or missing lectures to play or train. At least it didn't in the past.
 
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Benotti69 said:
gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Like the Monaghan player?

I'm currently on a prescription for Prednisolone. How many of them would know that is banned?

Education is a key aspect. The onus is on the GAA and the Irish Sports Council.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.

Never said there was no doping.

I agree with the testing on matchday and training but not out of competition with players having daily jobs and education to attend to.

I dont think it is hard to check with your pharmacist whether something contains a banned substance according to WADA or whatever code the GAA 'adhere' too. My guess is there is an app for the WADA code and you type in the name of your medicine and it comes up clean or 'dirty'.

As for OOC testing re education and jobs, it never stopped players getting time off work or missing lectures to play or train. At least it didn't in the past.

So what about Tomas O'Se as a teacher?

Or Jerry O'Connor as a Garda.

That's just a sampler.

That's an infringement. You're asking amateur players who have daily jobs and education and who don't get a cent of money for playing, to adhere to professional testing.
 
May 26, 2010
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gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Like the Monaghan player?

I'm currently on a prescription for Prednisolone. How many of them would know that is banned?

Education is a key aspect. The onus is on the GAA and the Irish Sports Council.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.

Never said there was no doping.

I agree with the testing on matchday and training but not out of competition with players having daily jobs and education to attend to.

I dont think it is hard to check with your pharmacist whether something contains a banned substance according to WADA or whatever code the GAA 'adhere' too. My guess is there is an app for the WADA code and you type in the name of your medicine and it comes up clean or 'dirty'.

As for OOC testing re education and jobs, it never stopped players getting time off work or missing lectures to play or train. At least it didn't in the past.

So what about Tomas O'Se as a teacher?

Or Jerry O'Connor as a Garda.

That's just a sampler.

That's an infringement. You're asking amateur players who have daily jobs and education and who don't get a cent of money for playing, to adhere to professional testing.

Teacher and Garda are the example. Jeez what a bunch of wasters! I would've thought you would give a multinational company who would not understand the importance of GAA to the Irish, but teachers and Garda, talk about dossers!

Well if players want to be taken seriously and they do considering the lengths they go to get to training, some travelling from the capital to west of Ireland and back a couple times a week in the evening, then a couple of OOC tests is no infringement, but if the GAA doesn't mind being tarnished as a being easy on doping well that is there right......
 
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So, as mechanical doping is currently a "hot topic" in cycling, let's add something from another sport, table tennis!

It used to be normal practice in Table Tennis to reapply the used "rubbers" on the table tennis bat ("racket") over and over again using a special "speed glue". The reason was that it increased the speed and spin of the bat tremendously compared to gluing the rubbers only once to the bat. A couple of years ago, the practice got banned with the official reason being that the solvent vapors of the glue were a health hazard. So, the practice of re-fixing the rubbers prior to a match disappeared. (It only works optimally if you re-fix the rubbers approximately 30 minutes before the match, which makes the practice easy to detect.)

Now, sports wouldn't be sports if the players didn't try to find a way to beat the restriction and they did find a way: Spraying chemicals to treat the rubber. Given the definition of the rule that bans the gluing practice, the application of chemicals is also illegal (and rightly so, in my opinion as a former player). However, just as in cycling, it was an open secret that a lot of elite players (estimates range to ~80%) did use said chemicals to enhance their rubbers and, just as in cycling, the international federation didn't seem to care and/or willing to do something against it. I can understand why they didn't really care as the old practice of applying speed glue was considered "normal" and only banned due to the health concerns.

However, the use of said chemicals is illegal and does introduce an additional vector in determining the playing field, as some playing styles benefit more from the practice than others. (It mostly benefits speed and spin playing styles.) Now, after years of looking the other way, the international federation has finally announced that they will start testing bats for said chemicals using a test developed by a chemist. I think the catalyst in the proceedings was the persistence of one of Europe's top players, the German Timo Boll, who, in interviews, criticized the federation over and over again for doing nothing about the practice.

So, "equipment doping" (not really "mechanical") is also a thing in other sports, but I guess we knew that given all the baseball bat controversies in the past and tennis ball rumors in the past decade. It also shows that outspoken sportsman do occasionally make a difference.
 
The ordeal of UFC's Wanderlei Silva finally is at an end. Originally suspended for life for dodging a 2014 OOC, which he contested claiming NSAC had no jurisdiction because he didn't then have a license to fight in Nevada. But licensing him was the second order of business the NSAC drug tester who he hid from was there to perform. Then the verdict was thrown out, and now has been re-heard. NSAC still found him guilty but reduced the suspension to three years, retroactive to May 2014. So he can fight again in May 2017. So either he can spend another two years fighting this decision, or shut up and fight in another 15 months.

And UFC lightweight fighter Gleison Tibau confessed to taking EPO (but says he didn't mean to) and has opted not to appeal. Tibau was the second fighter popped by USADA since taking the reigns of the UFC's anti-doping program.
 
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Re: Re:

gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Like the Monaghan player?

I'm currently on a prescription for Prednisolone. How many of them would know that is banned?

Education is a key aspect. The onus is on the GAA and the Irish Sports Council.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.

Never said there was no doping.

I agree with the testing on matchday and training but not out of competition with players having daily jobs and education to attend to.
prednesilone is a cortisone no?

I think there is a problem in actually taking something, then being required to be like a professional sportsman and then pay heed to WADA code. This is absurd. I mean, Sky and Lance thumbed their nose at TUEs and backdated prescriptions, some mathematics teacher who plays a B grade game of Irish/Gaelic football on the weekend, needs now to pay heed to some non government body from Montreal aways in Canada, which says you can or cannot take this on the weekend and play your game in the not really competitive B grade league in the gaelic municipality league? absurd. mission creep. Should not be the remit of WADA.

as long as it is not epo for a marathon or some roids for bulk and strength for football, WADA have no dog in this fight.
 
Re: Re:

Benotti69 said:
I dont think it is hard to check with your pharmacist whether something contains a banned substance according to WADA or whatever code the GAA 'adhere' too. My guess is there is an app for the WADA code and you type in the name of your medicine and it comes up clean or 'dirty'.

Actually it is pretty hard. Unless you bring the list with you then a pharmacist won't have any clue what's banned and is unlikely to give a crap to be honest. Even if you bring it with you, because the list is designed to cover drugs that aren't named you're still relying on the pharmacist properly reading, understanding and checking when frankly all they care about is the persons health.

As for an app, again the code is designed to cover things not specifically listed and many drugs are sold/dispensed under generic, simple and trade names. It would require constant updating and management with country specific naming. It's possible, but no-ones going to put the work into it.
 
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King Boonen said:
Benotti69 said:
I dont think it is hard to check with your pharmacist whether something contains a banned substance according to WADA or whatever code the GAA 'adhere' too. My guess is there is an app for the WADA code and you type in the name of your medicine and it comes up clean or 'dirty'.

Actually it is pretty hard. Unless you bring the list with you then a pharmacist won't have any clue what's banned and is unlikely to give a crap to be honest. Even if you bring it with you, because the list is designed to cover drugs that aren't named you're still relying on the pharmacist properly reading, understanding and checking when frankly all they care about is the persons health.

As for an app, again the code is designed to cover things not specifically listed and many drugs are sold/dispensed under generic, simple and trade names. It would require constant updating and management with country specific naming. It's possible, but no-ones going to put the work into it.

that sounds pretty easy, to be honest.
if you really want to race clean, that is.
if there'd be a clean cycling culture, i reckon pro-teams would have no problem whatsoever to arrange guaranteed clean supplements for their riders (or riders for themselves).

cases like impey's are an insult to the brain.
 
Re: Re:

blackcat said:
gooner said:
Benotti69 said:
Somehow i doubt it would be too hard to educate GAA players in what to take and what not to take. Most are 3rd level students.

Like the Monaghan player?

I'm currently on a prescription for Prednisolone. How many of them would know that is banned?

Education is a key aspect. The onus is on the GAA and the Irish Sports Council.

Whether you are amateur or not does not excuse you from knowing what is cheating and what is not. So amateurs don't dope? Of course they do and the GAA players are as likely to dope as any other sport, especially if there is little or no testing.

Some counties put their players through the ringer with training demands and the GAA is as competitive for some counties as professional sports. Some counties are very 'modern' in their approach.

Never said there was no doping.

I agree with the testing on matchday and training but not out of competition with players having daily jobs and education to attend to.
prednesilone is a cortisone no?

I think there is a problem in actually taking something, then being required to be like a professional sportsman and then pay heed to WADA code. This is absurd. I mean, Sky and Lance thumbed their nose at TUEs and backdated prescriptions, some mathematics teacher who plays a B grade game of Irish/Gaelic football on the weekend, needs now to pay heed to some non government body from Montreal aways in Canada, which says you can or cannot take this on the weekend and play your game in the not really competitive B grade league in the gaelic municipality league? absurd. mission creep. Should not be the remit of WADA.

as long as it is not epo for a marathon or some roids for bulk and strength for football, WADA have no dog in this fight.

This is the problem though, where do you draw the line? I'd argue that in amateur sport you should be able to take anything prescribed by a doctor, just as the general population can. But I think we can all see what's going to happen if that becomes that case...
 
Re: Re:

sniper said:
King Boonen said:
Benotti69 said:
I dont think it is hard to check with your pharmacist whether something contains a banned substance according to WADA or whatever code the GAA 'adhere' too. My guess is there is an app for the WADA code and you type in the name of your medicine and it comes up clean or 'dirty'.

Actually it is pretty hard. Unless you bring the list with you then a pharmacist won't have any clue what's banned and is unlikely to give a crap to be honest. Even if you bring it with you, because the list is designed to cover drugs that aren't named you're still relying on the pharmacist properly reading, understanding and checking when frankly all they care about is the persons health.

As for an app, again the code is designed to cover things not specifically listed and many drugs are sold/dispensed under generic, simple and trade names. It would require constant updating and management with country specific naming. It's possible, but no-ones going to put the work into it.

that sounds pretty easy, to be honest.
if you really want to race clean, that is.
if there'd be a clean cycling culture, i reckon pro-teams would have no problem whatsoever to arrange guaranteed clean supplements for their riders (or riders for themselves).

We are not talking about professional sports people, we are talking about amateurs.