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Fabian Cancellara: whereabouts

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Aug 6, 2009
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sherer said:
Are these trips to McDonalds trips for his kids to treat them, maybe he isn't even eating there just his kids ?

Seems you have very little to go on here

Hope it's not the same Mcdonalds that humanplasma clients used to wait in before being called 'accross the road'
 
sheenyp said:
It's 3 missed tests in 18 months so guessing PR 2010 has just fallen off the list so he's free to mention it with no impact

Whilst a missed test isn't as bad as a failed test its not good to miss them guilty or not its still fuel for the fire

Actually he mentioned it already in March about the time when his book was coming out.
 
sherer said:
So basically he won a race and went out to celebrate and then that caused him to miss a test the next day even though he was tested straight after winning.

You chose to leave that out to fit in with your agenda.

Are these trips to McDonalds trips for his kids to treat them, maybe he isn't even eating there just his kids ?

Seems you have very little to go on here

you're connecting the dots, just not the right ones. i haven't read the book but i'm guessing FC is positioning himself as a sympathetic figure. he's a partier and wants to celebrate a really big win. most can identify with that and would agree that it's his perogative. he wants you to think the testing time was intrusive and redundant as we all know a doping control immediately follows a win (which is wrong, a day or two afterwards is actually a good time to test or may have been scheduled somewhat randomly).

he's being manipulative in what has become a very trite way. the script goes something like this, "it's soooooo easy to miss a control, blah blah blah...", "the doping control officers are inflexible bullies blah blah blah...", "why can't i just live my life? blah blah blah..."

SSDD :rolleyes:
 
Wow, that's a lot of assumptions. From what I understand from the summary he knew that he wouldn't be home on time he put in the whereabouts system but forgot to change it for some reason between Flanders and Roubaix. Maybe it's different in the book, but he isn't complaining about testing or calling it intrusive in the summary I've read.
 
El Pistolero said:
In his book Cancellara admitted that he had already missed 2 doping tests and got 2 warnings for it. The first was the day after his Paris-Roubaix victory in 2010 and it is not said when precisely he got his second warning.

Cancellara was/is close to pulling a Rasmussen!

Discuss I guess.

As I said in the Rasmussen thread, I think we should have public disclosure of these missed test, perhaps not immediately, but after some time. The whereabouts system appears ripe for gaming. A doping athlete can play fast an loose with his whereabouts until he has missed 2 tests. An athlete can also appeal a missed test and at least in the USA, the tester has to prove that he tried hard enough to find the athlete. Additionally, once the 18 month window has passed, the missed tests drop off his record and he can begin dodging the testers again.
A full view of the actual tests taken, missed tests, appealed tests mapped against an athletes career would be very instructive. How many tests did Armstrong miss during his career or Landis? How many did they successfully appeal? How many times were they one missed test away from suspension? I want full disclosure.
 
Jul 2, 2009
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Orvieto said:
As I said in the Rasmussen thread, I think we should have public disclosure of these missed test, perhaps not immediately, but after some time. The whereabouts system appears ripe for gaming. A doping athlete can play fast an loose with his whereabouts until he has missed 2 tests. An athlete can also appeal a missed test and at least in the USA, the tester has to prove that he tried hard enough to find the athlete. Additionally, once the 18 month window has passed, the missed tests drop off his record and he can begin dodging the testers again.
A full view of the actual tests taken, missed tests, appealed tests mapped against an athletes career would be very instructive. How many tests did Armstrong miss during his career or Landis? How many did they successfully appeal? How many times were they one missed test away from suspension? I want full disclosure.

And in what way would public disclosure help to reduce or eradicate doping? How would it benefit clean sport? How would you, as one of 'the public', use this information to further the anti-doping cause?

The only reason you want public disclosure is you want gossip so you can a good old finger pointing session like this one.
 
Jul 6, 2010
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Mambo95 said:
And in what way would public disclosure help to reduce or eradicate doping? How would it benefit clean sport? How would you, as one of 'the public', use this information to further the anti-doping cause?

The only reason you want public disclosure is you want gossip so you can a good old finger pointing session like this one.

Yup........
 
lean said:
you're connecting the dots, just not the right ones. i haven't read the book but i'm guessing FC is positioning himself as a sympathetic figure. he's a partier and wants to celebrate a really big win. most can identify with that and would agree that it's his perogative. he wants you to think the testing time was intrusive and redundant as we all know a doping control immediately follows a win (which is wrong, a day or two afterwards is actually a good time to test or may have been scheduled somewhat randomly).

he's being manipulative in what has become a very trite way. the script goes something like this, "it's soooooo easy to miss a control, blah blah blah...", "the doping control officers are inflexible bullies blah blah blah...", "why can't i just live my life? blah blah blah..."

SSDD :rolleyes:
Maybe he's saying he just f$%ked up? As said earlier, a missed test =/= positive.

Suspicious? Of course, but not a guarantee of foul play :rolleyes:
 
Aug 13, 2009
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Mambo95 said:
And in what way would public disclosure help to reduce or eradicate doping? How would it benefit clean sport? How would you, as one of 'the public', use this information to further the anti-doping cause?

The only reason you want public disclosure is you want gossip so you can a good old finger pointing session like this one.

Riiiiiight. Manzano's public disclosure did nothing. :rolleyes:

Ask any rider and the main thing that keeps them from doping is not the test but the fear of getting caught and being exposed
 
I would be willing to bet that whereabouts violations are pretty common. The low probability of being tested has to make people less than conscientious about keeping their information up to date when sudden, unforseen circumstances come up.
 
BroDeal said:
I would be willing to bet that whereabouts violations are pretty common. The low probability of being tested has to make people less than conscientious about keeping their information up to date when sudden, unforseen circumstances come up.

It seems as if in the last couple of years this is becoming more so.
A lot of pressure is on to dredge up and report any possible cracks in the system...this one is a low-hanger...
 
Jul 2, 2009
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Race Radio said:
Riiiiiight. Manzano's public disclosure did nothing. :rolleyes:

Ask any rider and the main thing that keeps them from doping is not the test but the fear of getting caught and being exposed

Manzano is a completely different situation and you know it. I and the person I was responding to were just talking about missed tests, which are often missed quite innocently. Yet you want those innocents 'caught' and 'exposed'. I thought you of all people were better than that, so I'm disappointed that you too merely have a lust for gossip.
 
Mambo95 said:
And in what way would public disclosure help to reduce or eradicate doping? How would it benefit clean sport? How would you, as one of 'the public', use this information to further the anti-doping cause?

The only reason you want public disclosure is you want gossip so you can a good old finger pointing session like this one.

I want public disclosure because I have very little trust in the governing bodies' ability to police sport. I'm a consumer of this product called professional cycling. The producer of this product assures me of its purity. I would like to see the proof.

Nobody is going to be crucified for missing the odd test, but a consistent pattern of missed tests and appealed missed tests is suspicious. Athletes who are diligent about keeping their whereabouts information up to date and do not miss tests should be rewarded with the increased confidence of the public.