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I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
 
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fmk_RoI said:
Presented without comment. Marca.
Remember your first Vuelta in 2011. Are you still saying that your result [second in front of team leader Bradley Wiggins] was unexpected?

"Yes for sure. When that Vuelta began, my willingness to help the team leader, Bradley Wiggins, in the mountains was clear. After the first big mountain, I felt good, I was comfortable with the riders out in front. 'It's not bad', I told myself and that's where my process began, when I saw that I could go with the leaders and that I belonged to that group, I knew I could compete in the best races."

Have you ever analysed as to why in that specific moment and place that 'click' happened, the click that changed everything?

"Yes. I have found many reasons. I had an illness for three years before because of the bilharzia, a water virus that I contracted in Africa. In 2011 that virus began to weaken, and I started to become healthy again. I did revisions every six months and repeated the treatment.

"Another reason is that I lost enough weight, two or three kilos and that made me go further in the mountains. I also believe that I benefited from the responsibility, I had to be close to my line manager, Bradley Wiggins. Not having to be in the breaks, I became more relaxed with him in the peloton, it gave me more consistency in the last ascent. It was the first time I ran fine in the final moments."
How nice.

Apparently froome does not rank his AdH 2008 himself, no?
 
Jul 5, 2009
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yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
The whole thing drives me mental because THAT'S NOT HOW BILHARZIA WORKS. It's not even a virus. It's a parasite that has a short life cycle. The problems are short lived and the treatment is very effective.

John Swanson
 
Re:

yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
This wouldn't be tested for without strong suspicion.
 
Jul 5, 2009
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MatParker117 said:
yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
This wouldn't be tested for without strong suspicion.
They would test for eggs in the stool. The eggs being laid by the long dead schistomes that could have had any effect on his performance. The eggs that can't hatch inside the body. If the eggs had any effect, it would have been irritation and inflammation of the lining of his intestines and/or kidneys. Blood in the urine kind of thing. Having this last for three (!!!) years without going to a doctor? Hahahaha. No.

John Swanson
 
Feb 18, 2013
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fmk_RoI said:
Presented without comment. Marca.
Remember your first Vuelta in 2011. Are you still saying that your result [second in front of team leader Bradley Wiggins] was unexpected?

"Yes for sure. When that Vuelta began, my willingness to help the team leader, Bradley Wiggins, in the mountains was clear. After the first big mountain, I felt good, I was comfortable with the riders out in front. 'It's not bad', I told myself and that's where my process began, when I saw that I could go with the leaders and that I belonged to that group, I knew I could compete in the best races."

Have you ever analysed as to why in that specific moment and place that 'click' happened, the click that changed everything?

"Yes. I have found many reasons. I had an illness for three years before because of the bilharzia, a water virus that I contracted in Africa. In 2011 that virus began to weaken, and I started to become healthy again. I did revisions every six months and repeated the treatment.

"Another reason is that I lost enough weight, two or three kilos and that made me go further in the mountains. I also believe that I benefited from the responsibility, I had to be close to my line manager, Bradley Wiggins. Not having to be in the breaks, I became more relaxed with him in the peloton, it gave me more consistency in the last ascent. It was the first time I ran fine in the final moments."
LOL - November 2010 according to this article:

http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/froome-still-battling-parasitic-infection/

He couldn't lie straight in bed...
 
Dec 30, 2009
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ScienceIsCool said:
yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
The whole thing drives me mental because THAT'S NOT HOW BILHARZIA WORKS. It's not even a virus. It's a parasite that has a short life cycle. The problems are short lived and the treatment is very effective.

John Swanson
This. I still remember the rather loud guffaw from my South African sis in law when I asked her about Froome (who she had never heard of) and his claims about bilharzia. A few of her friends had caught this as kids and were treated immediately after the symptoms emerged and recovered within WEEKS!! Her final comment was it really is no big deal and EASILY treated but we didn't go swimming there again. And yes she is medically trained with a degree from Joburg uni...
 
Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
MatParker117 said:
yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
This wouldn't be tested for without strong suspicion.
They would test for eggs in the stool. The eggs being laid by the long dead schistomes that could have had any effect on his performance. The eggs that can't hatch inside the body. If the eggs had any effect, it would have been irritation and inflammation of the lining of his intestines and/or kidneys. Blood in the urine kind of thing. Having this last for three (!!!) years without going to a doctor? Hahahaha. No.

John Swanson
You might want to check that...
 
Jul 5, 2009
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King Boonen said:
ScienceIsCool said:
MatParker117 said:
yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
This wouldn't be tested for without strong suspicion.
They would test for eggs in the stool. The eggs being laid by the long dead schistomes that could have had any effect on his performance. The eggs that can't hatch inside the body. If the eggs had any effect, it would have been irritation and inflammation of the lining of his intestines and/or kidneys. Blood in the urine kind of thing. Having this last for three (!!!) years without going to a doctor? Hahahaha. No.

John Swanson
You might want to check that...
Holy cow, you're right! I thought it was just a few months, but apparently it's 2-5 years. However, the notion that they were hindering Froome is still preposterous. This is how the parasite manifests:

http://parasite.org.au/para-site/text/schistosoma-text.html

First you get swimmer's itch. Then you get a fever as you get a histological response to the first eggs. Then you might get a host of problems related to granulomas due to the eggs calcifying in the linings of your organs, intestines, etc. The first two symptoms are transient. If Froome had any of the chronic symptoms they would have been VERY troubling and he would have received medical care.

"Schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) is unusual amongst helminth diseases for two reasons: much of the pathogenesis is due to the eggs (rather than larvae or adults); and most of the pathology is caused by host immune responses (delayed-type hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions). The course of infection is often divided into three phases: migratory, acute and chronic. The migratory phase occurs when cercariae penetrate and migrate through the skin. This is often asymptomatic, but in sensitized patients, it may cause transient dermatitis (‘swimmers itch’), and occasionally pulmonary lesions and pneumonitis. The acute phase (sometimes called Katayama fever) is coincident with first egg release and is characterized by allergic responses (serum sickness due to overwhelming immune complex formation), resulting in pyrexia, fatigue, aches, lymphadenopathy, gastrointestinal discomfort and eosinophilia. The chronic phase occurs in response to the cumulative deposition of fluke eggs in tissues and the host reactions that develop against them. Not all the eggs laid by female worms successfully penetrate the gut or bladder walls, many are swept away in the circulation and become trapped in organs where they elicit strong granulomatous responses. Eggs become surrounded by inflammatory cells forming characteristic pseudotubercles, which may coalesce to form larger granulomatous reactions (polyps). The encapsulated eggs die and eventually calcify. The resultant effects on host organs and tissues are manifold, and include intestinal polyposis, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, glumerulonephritis, pulmonary arteritis, cardiovascular problems including heart failure, and periportal (Symmer’s clay pipe-stem) fibrosis. Portal hypertension often leads to hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, ascites, and sometimes gross enlargement of oesophageal and gastric veins (varices) which may burst. Cerebral granulomas have been associated with focal epileptic convulsions, while spinal cord granulomas may cause transverse myelitis. Infections by S. haematobium often cause haematuria (blood in urine) and progressive disruption of the bladder wall may lead to carcinoma."

John Swanson
 
Re: Re:

ScienceIsCool said:
King Boonen said:
ScienceIsCool said:
MatParker117 said:
yaco said:
I find it strange that WT cyclists who have the best medical care can be affected by Bilharzia for three years. Gee, cyclists do a full battery of tests at least once a year and additionally are tested by the UCI every three months.
This wouldn't be tested for without strong suspicion.
They would test for eggs in the stool. The eggs being laid by the long dead schistomes that could have had any effect on his performance. The eggs that can't hatch inside the body. If the eggs had any effect, it would have been irritation and inflammation of the lining of his intestines and/or kidneys. Blood in the urine kind of thing. Having this last for three (!!!) years without going to a doctor? Hahahaha. No.

John Swanson
You might want to check that...
Holy cow, you're right! I thought it was just a few months, but apparently it's 2-5 years. However, the notion that they were hindering Froome is still preposterous. This is how the parasite manifests:

http://parasite.org.au/para-site/text/schistosoma-text.html

First you get swimmer's itch. Then you get a fever as you get a histological response to the first eggs. Then you might get a host of problems related to granulomas due to the eggs calcifying in the linings of your organs, intestines, etc. The first two symptoms are transient. If Froome had any of the chronic symptoms they would have been VERY troubling and he would have received medical care.

"Schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis) is unusual amongst helminth diseases for two reasons: much of the pathogenesis is due to the eggs (rather than larvae or adults); and most of the pathology is caused by host immune responses (delayed-type hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions). The course of infection is often divided into three phases: migratory, acute and chronic. The migratory phase occurs when cercariae penetrate and migrate through the skin. This is often asymptomatic, but in sensitized patients, it may cause transient dermatitis (‘swimmers itch’), and occasionally pulmonary lesions and pneumonitis. The acute phase (sometimes called Katayama fever) is coincident with first egg release and is characterized by allergic responses (serum sickness due to overwhelming immune complex formation), resulting in pyrexia, fatigue, aches, lymphadenopathy, gastrointestinal discomfort and eosinophilia. The chronic phase occurs in response to the cumulative deposition of fluke eggs in tissues and the host reactions that develop against them. Not all the eggs laid by female worms successfully penetrate the gut or bladder walls, many are swept away in the circulation and become trapped in organs where they elicit strong granulomatous responses. Eggs become surrounded by inflammatory cells forming characteristic pseudotubercles, which may coalesce to form larger granulomatous reactions (polyps). The encapsulated eggs die and eventually calcify. The resultant effects on host organs and tissues are manifold, and include intestinal polyposis, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, glumerulonephritis, pulmonary arteritis, cardiovascular problems including heart failure, and periportal (Symmer’s clay pipe-stem) fibrosis. Portal hypertension often leads to hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, ascites, and sometimes gross enlargement of oesophageal and gastric veins (varices) which may burst. Cerebral granulomas have been associated with focal epileptic convulsions, while spinal cord granulomas may cause transverse myelitis. Infections by S. haematobium often cause haematuria (blood in urine) and progressive disruption of the bladder wall may lead to carcinoma."

John Swanson
You were likely thinking of the life cycle, but the parasite doesn't die, it continues to lay eggs.

The likelihood of it being a problem for Froome is small, but it isn't preposterous. Drug resistance to Praziquantel has been noted in Kenya (and Egypt) as far back as 1999 and multiple treatments are not uncommon. Diagnosis is also not as easy as people want to make out, Kato-Katz generally needs to be done 3 times and if the egg burden is low it's possible to miss them. There is also the issue of whether they carry out the test or not, it's much more routine in Africa but generally assumed to affect people from poor and rural areas. It's quite possible that with someone like Froome it could be missed.

I'm not defending Froome here, I can't remember all the twists and turns this story went through and I know that Froome and Brailsford have been caught out with differing stories at times making it highly questionable that schistosomiasis was really such a huge influence.

It is surprising, however, that many people want to read a few things they find online and make such forceful statements about schistosomiasis infection, detection and treatment.
 
I have a yearly health check up which includes blood tests, stool and urine samples, ECG and a body x-ray - Usually this battery of tests will detect any abnormality and then follow up tests/procedures are organised - Cyclists have a yearly health check up which is a step above my tests, while the UCI does quarterly tests for all WT/PCT cyclists - I am certain that this series of tests would eventually detect Bilharzia - In saying that treatment nd recovery varies for each individual, but nearly three years means you are dead-set unlucky.
 
Re:

yaco said:
I have a yearly health check up which includes blood tests, stool and urine samples, ECG and a body x-ray - Usually this battery of tests will detect any abnormality and then follow up tests/procedures are organised - Cyclists have a yearly health check up which is a step above my tests, while the UCI does quarterly tests for all WT/PCT cyclists - I am certain that this series of tests would eventually detect Bilharzia - In saying that treatment nd recovery varies for each
individual, but nearly three years means you are dead-set unlucky.
Firstly, reference?


Please explain, in detail, the tests they undergo that you believe would detect schistosomiasis and why.
 
Re: Re:

King Boonen said:
yaco said:
I have a yearly health check up which includes blood tests, stool and urine samples, ECG and a body x-ray - Usually this battery of tests will detect any abnormality and then follow up tests/procedures are organised - Cyclists have a yearly health check up which is a step above my tests, while the UCI does quarterly tests for all WT/PCT cyclists - I am certain that this series of tests would eventually detect Bilharzia - In saying that treatment nd recovery varies for each
individual, but nearly three years means you are dead-set unlucky.
Firstly, reference?


Please explain, in detail, the tests they undergo that you believe would detect schistosomiasis and why.
When an elite athlete undertakes a full medical with the attendant battery of test the first results are merely 'markers' to indicate you have may have an abnormality - For example a cyclist has the following yearly test ecg, full pulmonary examination, stress and echo cardiogram, full blood count inc GOT,GRB, creatinnes, reticulocites, testesterone, urinary stick, serology, ferritin and calciumm, glucose,proteins, Gamma Ct,CPK, TSH, etc,etc - And many of these tests are repeated in a cyclists three month test which is mandated by the UCI. Then the medicos organise further blood tests, scans etc,etc etc to further investigate the abnormality - So eventually the medicos will diagnose Bilharzia - For example, Cavendish found out he had glandular fever after a quarterly UCI test - Or blood tests can be used as a marker to suggest you have cancer which is then followed up with other relevant medical tests to check the validity of the original blood test.

To be frank you are ' pissing in the wind' if you think medical professionals can't test and eventually diagnose Bilharzia - They've effectively diagnosed this illness for many years - The two issues are it can take time to diagnose the illness and individual patients may react differently to treatment - Finally it's strange to think that pro cyclists with the best medical care can have an illness be undiagnosed for a long period of time.
 
Re: Re:

yaco said:
King Boonen said:
yaco said:
I have a yearly health check up which includes blood tests, stool and urine samples, ECG and a body x-ray - Usually this battery of tests will detect any abnormality and then follow up tests/procedures are organised - Cyclists have a yearly health check up which is a step above my tests, while the UCI does quarterly tests for all WT/PCT cyclists - I am certain that this series of tests would eventually detect Bilharzia - In saying that treatment nd recovery varies for each
individual, but nearly three years means you are dead-set unlucky.
Firstly, reference?


Please explain, in detail, the tests they undergo that you believe would detect schistosomiasis and why.
When an elite athlete undertakes a full medical with the attendant battery of test the first results are merely 'markers' to indicate you have may have an abnormality - For example a cyclist has the following yearly test ecg, full pulmonary examination, stress and echo cardiogram, full blood count inc GOT,GRB, creatinnes, reticulocites, testesterone, urinary stick, serology, ferritin and calciumm, glucose,proteins, Gamma Ct,CPK, TSH, etc,etc - And many of these tests are repeated in a cyclists three month test which is mandated by the UCI. Then the medicos organise further blood tests, scans etc,etc etc to further investigate the abnormality - So eventually the medicos will diagnose Bilharzia - For example, Cavendish found out he had glandular fever after a quarterly UCI test - Or blood tests can be used as a marker to suggest you have cancer which is then followed up with other relevant medical tests to check the validity of the original blood test.

To be frank you are ' pissing in the wind' if you think medical professionals can't test and eventually diagnose Bilharzia - They've effectively diagnosed this illness for many years - The two issues are it can take time to diagnose the illness and individual patients may react differently to treatment - Finally it's strange to think that pro cyclists with the best medical care can have an illness be undiagnosed for a long period of time.
Again, reference?

None of those tests will detect schistosomiasis, to carry out any test you have to know that you are looking for it which isn’t going to happen routinely. There are many, many other things that are more likely and will be looked into. If you really want to see how likely it is go and ask a load of European doctors what the symptoms of schistosomiasis are and how you would go about diagnosing it.
 
Froome's story has been debunked many times here. Recently, Hitch, who has looked into it especially thoroughly, sent me a long article documenting all the lies and/or misstatements Froome/Sky have made on the matter. Really, the fact that after all this time Froome would refer to schisto as a virus says it all.

It's not just that needing five separate treatments with PZQ is unheard of, even one of Froome's own doctors was quoted as saying it didn't make sense. Even if we bought into this, the timeline of treatments doesn't jibe with his performance. E.g., he needed another treatment not long after his 2011 Vuelta win. As Hitch has documented in detail, Froome can't even get his story straight about when and how it was initially diagnosed, and when and where and what his treatments consisted of.
 
Merckx index said:
Froome's story has been debunked many times here. Recently, Hitch, who has looked into it especially thoroughly, sent me a long article documenting all the lies and/or misstatements Froome/Sky have made on the matter. Really, the fact that after all this time Froome would refer to schisto as a virus says it all.

It's not just that needing five separate treatments with PZQ is unheard of, even one of Froome's own doctors was quoted as saying it didn't make sense. Even if we bought into this, the timeline of treatments doesn't jibe with his performance. E.g., he needed another treatment not long after his 2011 Vuelta win. As Hitch has documented in detail, Froome can't even get his story straight about when and how it was initially diagnosed, and when and where and what his treatments consisted of.
The “Badzhilla, the disease of champions” thread wrapped up a lot of good information on this topic, I’ll bump the thread as it’s very good:

viewtopic.php?f=20&t=21198&hilit=bilharzia

The Froome contradiction sheet read like this:

2009/2010 - Contraction

"I probably had it for year before I found it." (Sep '11)
"I found it 18 months ago and they had probably been in my system for a year before that." (May '12)

Dec 2010 - Diagnosis (and presumably Treatment)

"Bilharzia – it’s a water-borne disease, which I found that I had it in December last year." (Sep '11)

March/April 2012 - Treatment

"I took the treatment three weeks ago and I've got to wait six months to see if it's still active or not." (May '12)

“The bilharzia is not totally cleared up. I did repeat the treatment about three months ago in March. I am clear for now. I need to go check again in August-September." (Jul '12)

“I had a two week treatment in April last year, and have since been clear of the parasite. I have it checked every six months to make sure it hasn't returned.” (Dec '12)

January 2013 - Check-Up (and inferred Treatment)

”I do go for a check-up every six months. The last was in January and it was still in my system. I take Biltricide. It kills the parasite in the system.” (Jul '13)
 
I thik the Dr's would notice the blood abnormalities and attempt to find the reason. Froome said they munch all the red blood cells so surely there must have been a low RBC, no? From there they should be able to track down the reason for infection. Not a virus like dawg says. He doesn't even know what his own ilness is. Counterfeit.
 
Re:

veganrob said:
I thik the Dr's would notice the blood abnormalities and attempt to find the reason. Froome said they munch all the red blood cells so surely there must have been a low RBC, no? From there they should be able to track down the reason for infection. Not a virus like dawg says. He doesn't even know what his own ilness is. Counterfeit.
Again, this has all been discussed. While the worms do eat red cells, not enough to affect HT. The big problem with blood is antigens, or proteins, released from the eggs can react with and inactive hemoglobin. So in theory, the Hb/HT ratio could be affected, which is something the passport might detect. That's not to say that a passport could reveal schisto, but it might suggest a problem with the blood which would be followed up by tests, including one for schisto. According to at least one of Froome's explanations, he was tested for schisto because there was a lab equipped to do that adjacent to the one where he went for a passport. Hitch has a lot of details on this, maybe he will post them.

But again, as discussed before, Grappe had access to Froome's passport data during periods when he was supposedly hampered by schisto, and claimed there were no abnormalities. Taking that at face value--which unfortunately is something we can never do with anything involving Froome--this would rule out a significant effect of the disease on his oxygen transport system. It might affect him in other ways, but this coming and going during the season for several years, during which period he was getting treated periodically, makes no sense.
 
Re: Re:

Merckx index said:
veganrob said:
I thik the Dr's would notice the blood abnormalities and attempt to find the reason. Froome said they munch all the red blood cells so surely there must have been a low RBC, no? From there they should be able to track down the reason for infection. Not a virus like dawg says. He doesn't even know what his own ilness is. Counterfeit.
Again, this has all been discussed. While the worms do eat red cells, not enough to affect HT. The big problem with blood is antigens, or proteins, released from the eggs can react with and inactive hemoglobin. So in theory, the Hb/HT ratio could be affected, which is something the passport might detect. That's not to say that a passport could reveal schisto, but it might suggest a problem with the blood which would be followed up by tests, including one for schisto. According to at least one of Froome's explanations, he was tested for schisto because there was a lab equipped to do that adjacent to the one where he went for a passport. Hitch has a lot of details on this, maybe he will post them.

But again, as discussed before, Grappe had access to Froome's passport data during periods when he was supposedly hampered by schisto, and claimed there were no abnormalities. Taking that at face value--which unfortunately is something we can never do with anything involving Froome--this would rule out a significant effect of the disease on his oxygen transport system. It might affect him in other ways, but this coming and going during the season for several years, during which period he was getting treated periodically, makes no sense.
Grappe only received power data from 2011 Sept onwards and the number of drug tests. It was Freeman (yes, Dr. Richard Freeman!) who assured David Walsh in the book ‘Inside Sky’ that he reviewed Froome’s passport and blood tests and saw nothing out of order. Walsh of course accepted this explanation, even now that Freeman’s conduct has been brought into question.

Sky also released data regarding the drug tests that Froome has undergone recently, revealing to l'Equipe that he has been tested 19 times in this Tour – 13 blood and/or urine tests, and six biological passport profiles – while during this season he has been tested 29 times, 23 times in competition, six times out of competition.

As any close follower of cycling knows, drug test figures are meaningless in proving a rider's probity, but what they do show is that Froome and his team are being closely monitored, even if they are keeping essential figures to themselves.
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2013/jul/18/team-sky-chris-froome-data
 
Just an alternative thought...
Maybe the reason there are lots of inconsistencies and contradictions from Froome on dates etc when referring to the whole issue is because he's actually telling the truth and therefore never felt the need to accurately memorise the whole history, as i'm sure he would have been much more prone to do if he was fabricating a complete lie to sell to the public.

I'm pretty sure if i was asked by numerous different people over the course of several years to recount my medical history over the last ten years or so id just be taking a guess at some of the dates and would be almost certain to get some of them wrong and therefore contradict myself.

I've no idea if Froome is lying about this or not, but there appears to be a commonly held belief on here that examples of where he's contradicted himself provides positive proof that he's lying.

On the basis that someone trying to fabricate and support such a huge lie with devastating consequences if found out, would be much more polished and consistent in presenting said lie to the public, it could just as strongly be held up in support of the belief that he's actually telling the truth.
 
Merckx index said:
Froome's story has been debunked many times here. Recently, Hitch, who has looked into it especially thoroughly, sent me a long article documenting all the lies and/or misstatements Froome/Sky have made on the matter. Really, the fact that after all this time Froome would refer to schisto as a virus says it all.

It's not just that needing five separate treatments with PZQ is unheard of, even one of Froome's own doctors was quoted as saying it didn't make sense. Even if we bought into this, the timeline of treatments doesn't jibe with his performance. E.g., he needed another treatment not long after his 2011 Vuelta win. As Hitch has documented in detail, Froome can't even get his story straight about when and how it was initially diagnosed, and when and where and what his treatments consisted of.
As I said in my first post, I'm not defending Froome at all, I'm well aware that his account has been pulled apart many times and each telling has been inconsistent. I've just finally got sick of people reading WebMD and then posting "facts" as if they've spent the last 10 years as a parasitologist/immunologist working in a rural clinic in Kenya.

veganrob said:
I thik the Dr's would notice the blood abnormalities and attempt to find the reason. Froome said they munch all the red blood cells so surely there must have been a low RBC, no? From there they should be able to track down the reason for infection. Not a virus like dawg says. He doesn't even know what his own ilness is. Counterfeit.
Same as above really. My problem is people stating facts that are wrong and the general impression that schistosomiasis is easily detectable and treatable in every infection.
 
brownbobby said:
Just an alternative thought...
Maybe the reason there are lots of inconsistencies and contradictions from Froome on dates etc when referring to the whole issue is because he's actually telling the truth and therefore never felt the need to accurately memorise the whole history, as i'm sure he would have been much more prone to do if he was fabricating a complete lie to sell to the public.

I'm pretty sure if i was asked by numerous different people over the course of several years to recount my medical history over the last ten years or so id just be taking a guess at some of the dates and would be almost certain to get some of them wrong and therefore contradict myself.

I've no idea if Froome is lying about this or not, but there appears to be a commonly held belief on here that examples of where he's contradicted himself provides positive proof that he's lying.

On the basis that someone trying to fabricate and support such a huge lie with devastating consequences if found out, would be much more polished and consistent in presenting said lie to the public, it could just as strongly be held up in support of the belief that he's actually telling the truth.
Based on the Froome’s account, both Chris and Michele, it certainly looks like the both of them read WebMD and attempted to make up the condition and it’s ailments. The inconsistencies from interview to interview is what’s most troubling.
 
thehog said:
brownbobby said:
Just an alternative thought...
Maybe the reason there are lots of inconsistencies and contradictions from Froome on dates etc when referring to the whole issue is because he's actually telling the truth and therefore never felt the need to accurately memorise the whole history, as i'm sure he would have been much more prone to do if he was fabricating a complete lie to sell to the public.

I'm pretty sure if i was asked by numerous different people over the course of several years to recount my medical history over the last ten years or so id just be taking a guess at some of the dates and would be almost certain to get some of them wrong and therefore contradict myself.

I've no idea if Froome is lying about this or not, but there appears to be a commonly held belief on here that examples of where he's contradicted himself provides positive proof that he's lying.

On the basis that someone trying to fabricate and support such a huge lie with devastating consequences if found out, would be much more polished and consistent in presenting said lie to the public, it could just as strongly be held up in support of the belief that he's actually telling the truth.
Based on the Froome’s account, both Chris and Michele, it certainly looks like the both of them read WebMD and attempted to make up the condition and it’s ailments. The inconsistencies from interview to interview is what’s most troubling.
Copy KB on that.
 

CTQ

Mar 12, 2016
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" If eggs are present at the time of diagnosis, follow-up examination 1 to 2 mo after treatment is suggested to help confirm cure. Treatment is repeated if eggs are still present."

"Patients should be examined for living eggs 3 and 6 mo after treatment. Retreatment is indicated if egg excretion has not decreased markedly"

It's not necessarly a 'one shot' treatment, easily treated as someone wrote.

http://www.merckmanuals.com/en-ca/professional/infectious-diseases/trematodes-flukes/schistosomiasis
 
thehog said:
brownbobby said:
Just an alternative thought...
Maybe the reason there are lots of inconsistencies and contradictions from Froome on dates etc when referring to the whole issue is because he's actually telling the truth and therefore never felt the need to accurately memorise the whole history, as i'm sure he would have been much more prone to do if he was fabricating a complete lie to sell to the public.

I'm pretty sure if i was asked by numerous different people over the course of several years to recount my medical history over the last ten years or so id just be taking a guess at some of the dates and would be almost certain to get some of them wrong and therefore contradict myself.

I've no idea if Froome is lying about this or not, but there appears to be a commonly held belief on here that examples of where he's contradicted himself provides positive proof that he's lying.

On the basis that someone trying to fabricate and support such a huge lie with devastating consequences if found out, would be much more polished and consistent in presenting said lie to the public, it could just as strongly be held up in support of the belief that he's actually telling the truth.
Based on the Froome’s account, both Chris and Michele, it certainly looks like the both of them read WebMD and attempted to make up the condition and it’s ailments. The inconsistencies from interview to interview is what’s most troubling.
Could well be the case. Pick something that is endemic to a region you spend some time in, has an incubation period that would likely put you out of that region when it manifests and you have a good cover.
 

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