General Doping Thread.

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May 21, 2015
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staubsauger said:
At least in soccer they still do doping controls like back in 1998 I think. Ya'll know how ineffective those controls were. So actually the soccer players are still able to use the very same doping products that set like every climbing record in cycling until the motor doping spiced up things again after like 15-20 years. I honestly dunno whether that's so different in tennis. At least in the NHL according to Lance Armstrong they weren't even testing for HGH & IGF-1 properly few years back.

Cycling was and properly still is the most progressive sport regarding doping. Both because new products are tried out earlier and the steadily actualized controls makes need for new doping methods. But with EPO in it's different varieties (Eprex, Aranesp, Cera) still being the best drug ever a sport like soccer where it's still possible to play old-school is probably more rotten nowadays!
Is it that secretive in the NFL. Hunter S. Thompson exposed it in the 70's, ludicrously short suspensions are handed out, it's a case of being sensible and not getting caught.

Apologies, quoted incorrectly!
 
Oh, this is lovely:

The Iditarod Trail Committee today revealed four-time champion Dallas Seavey as the musher behind four dogs who tested positive for illegal opioids during this year’s race. (Seavey came in second place behind... his dad, Mitch Seavey, who beat him by nearly three hours to become both the oldest and fastest winner in race history.) While the younger Seavey will not be punished—under the rules that were in effect at the time of the race, a musher cannot be punished for doping if intent cannot be proven—he announced his intent to withdraw from next year’s Iditarod in protest over how the drug results have been handled.
he believes that someone else gave his dogs the opioid “maliciously.”
https://deadspin.com/former-iditarod-champ-dallas-seavey-revealed-as-musher-1819790524
 
Re:

Merckx index said:
Oh, this is lovely:

The Iditarod Trail Committee today revealed four-time champion Dallas Seavey as the musher behind four dogs who tested positive for illegal opioids during this year’s race. (Seavey came in second place behind... his dad, Mitch Seavey, who beat him by nearly three hours to become both the oldest and fastest winner in race history.) While the younger Seavey will not be punished—under the rules that were in effect at the time of the race, a musher cannot be punished for doping if intent cannot be proven—he announced his intent to withdraw from next year’s Iditarod in protest over how the drug results have been handled.
he believes that someone else gave his dogs the opioid “maliciously.”
https://deadspin.com/former-iditarod-champ-dallas-seavey-revealed-as-musher-1819790524
I just watched this on CNN as I heard about it for the first time today.

Whatever's going on up there in Alaska you can bet that the dogs are the losers in this case, they're the only ones being cheated out of quality care and humane treatment. If Seavey's telling the truth about some sort of conspiracy (as likely as Tyler's twin) then shame on the wretched souls who sabotage dog sledding by harming a defenseless animal, or if Seavey's lying then may he rot in hell.

http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2017/10/27/iditarod-dogs-banned-substance-seavey-cooper-ac-ridiculist.cnn/video/playlists/ac360-ridiculist/
 
Dec 18, 2013
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Robert5091 said:
If a drug is banned for race horses then why is it allowed for cyclists?

http://capovelo.com/Tramadol-34Doping-in-Cycling34/
Lots of meds are species specific in what they do, it would be ridiculous to ban any drug you found a performance enhancing effect with in another animal because I'm sure somewhere is an animal that responds to aspirin in a PED fashion....doesn't mean it would be the same for humans.

Likewise this conflation of horse steroids (when talking about prednisolone) is also ridiculous, lots of the same meds are used both in veterinary medicine and human medicine but with very different results...clenbuterol in an Alberto Contador will cause weight loss but in cattle it acts more like an anabolic and causes massive tissue growth.

Then there is the TUE process...rightly or wrongly should the only analgesia available to a cyclist be aspirin or acetaminophen?...they're pretty weak, if i was soldiering on with a broken collarbone, cracked pelvis etc I'd want something stronger too...so there has to be some balance.
 
May 26, 2010
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Philipa York (aka Robert Millar) on her doping

.....for all York’s new openness, there is a frustrating coyness on this thorny subject. “I have a doping conviction,” York does acknowledge of the 1992 Vuelta. An excess of testosterone was recorded, and a punishment meted out of a £1,100 fine, a ten-minute penalty and a three-month suspended ban.

York disputes the findings, the levels discovered, but, pressed on the issue, says: “I was a rider of those times. How you present that is up to you. You lived by the culture of the people round about you. You lived by their morals. If they became your morals . . .

“You are a victim in a way. A victim of a system that allows no way of informing anyone outside what was happening on the inside. A willing victim, I would say. When you want to do something that much you take the bad bits with the good bits.”
I dont see any change from York's time to now.

"a rider of those times"

"lived by the culture of the people round about you"

"lived by their morals. If they became your morals"

"A victim of a system"

"When you want to do something that much you take the bad bits with the good bits.”

Cycling has not changed its cultre as it has not changed the type of person who inhabits the sport, the Lefevre, Unzue, Vinos, Saronni, Vaughters, Och and Brailford. These people enable and demand the doping (inc motors) to get the results.
 
https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/sports/1392938/japan-kayak-racer-banned-8-years-for-spiking-drink-of-rival
A Japanese kayaker has been banned from competition for eight years for spiking the drink of a rival so that he would fail a doping test.

Yasuhiro Suzuki drugged his key rival at last year's national championships in September. Suzuki spiked the drink of rival Seiji Komatsu with an anabolic steroid causing him to fail a doping test, the Japan Anti-Doping Agency said Tuesday.

The Japan Canoe Federation began investigating after Komatsu tested positive but denied ever taking drugs.

After Komatsu tested positive, Suzuki admitted putting a muscle-building supplement containing the banned steroid methandienone in his drink.

The incident is Japan's first case of an athlete failing a doping test due to deliberate contamination, according to the Japan Anti-Doping Agency, which handed down the eight-year ban.
wow! :surprised:
 
Hey Pebs !

While browsing the UKAD site, I found a sanction that lists the offender as 'Unnamed Athlete'.

Mr, or Mrs Unnamed got themselves a 4 year ban, & the sport is Rugby Union.

How does this anonymity square with UKAD, & WADA Practices ?, I would have thought that granting any athlete who tests positive anonymity, massively compromises the entire process.
 
keeponrollin said:
Hey Pebs !

While browsing the UKAD site, I found a sanction that lists the offender as 'Unnamed Athlete'.

Mr, or Mrs Unnamed got themselves a 4 year ban, & the sport is Rugby Union.

How does this anonymity square with UKAD, & WADA Practices ?, I would have thought that granting any athlete who tests positive anonymity, massively compromises the entire process.
Likely it's a minor. In cases involving minors mandatory public disclosure usually isn't required by governing bodies and can be reported anonymously/proportionally. It'll be in the World Rugby regulations if you are really interested but I'd put money on that being the case.
 
King Boonen said:
keeponrollin said:
Hey Pebs !

While browsing the UKAD site, I found a sanction that lists the offender as 'Unnamed Athlete'.

Mr, or Mrs Unnamed got themselves a 4 year ban, & the sport is Rugby Union.

How does this anonymity square with UKAD, & WADA Practices ?, I would have thought that granting any athlete who tests positive anonymity, massively compromises the entire process.
Likely it's a minor. In cases involving minors mandatory public disclosure usually isn't required by governing bodies and can be reported anonymously/proportionally. It'll be in the World Rugby regulations if you are really interested but I'd put money on that being the case.
Ah; that makes sense, Thanks !
 
https://www.afp.com/en/news/207/doping-wada-probes-possible-flaw-test-bottles-doc-y76oc1
The World Anti-Doping Agency said Sunday it had launched an investigation into a possible glitch in drug-testing kits which could allow sample bottles to be opened manually.

WADA said in a statement it had been alerted by an accredited laboratory in Cologne that bottles manufactured by Swiss firm Berlinger could be opened after being frozen.

The glass containers, known as the BEREG-KIT Geneva, were touted as the next generation of sample bottles after being released last year in the wake of the Russian doping scandal that dogged the 2014 Winter Olympics.

It was not clear if the new Berlinger bottles were due to be used at next month's Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang.

WADA did not immediately respond to a request for clarification from AFP.

In its statement, WADA said it had "initiated an investigation into a potential integrity issue with the new generation BEREG-KIT Geneva security bottles and will recommend appropriate measures, if needed, in order to maintain the integrity of the doping control process."

The agency said it was alerted to the possible flaw by the Cologne laboratory on January 19.

The lab had found that the bottle "may potentially be susceptible to manual opening 'upon freezing' of a sample."

WADA said it had contacted Berlinger over the issue, and the Swiss company later responded that it had been unable to replicate the flaw found by the German laboratory.

"WADA is following up with the Cologne Laboratory and Berlinger to further clarify the testing protocols that have been undertaken to date," WADA said in a statement.

"WADA acknowledges that this situation, if confirmed, will raise concerns and questions. We wish to reassure athletes and other stakeholders that WADA is resolutely committed to following up with Berlinger until the matter is resolved; and that, we will keep stakeholders apprised as the situation evolves," WADA added.
 
http://www.uci.ch/pressreleases/uci-statement-the-vuelta-ciclista-internacional-costa-rica/

UCI statement on the Vuelta Ciclista Internacional a Costa Rica
31 January 2018


The Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) announces that 12 riders were notified of an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF) in samples collected on 22 December 2017 during the Vuelta Ciclista Internacional a Costa Rica.

The riders Juan Carlos Rojas Villalegas, Cesar Andres Rojas Villalegas, Jewinson Leandro Varela Zuniga, Vladimir Fernandez Torres, Jose Alexis Rodriquez Villalobos, Jason Huertas Araya, Jose Irias, Gabriel Eduardo Marin Sanchez, Melvin Mora Garita, Kevin Murillo Solano and Jordy Sandoval were notified of an AAF of CERA*. The rider Jeancarlo Padilla was notified of an AAF of EPO*.

These intelligence-led doping controls were planned and carried out by the Cycling Anti-Doping Foundation (CADF), the independent body in charge of defining and implementing the anti-doping strategy in cycling, with the assistance of the Federacion Costarricense de Ciclismo, the Comisión Nacional Antidopaje de Costa Rica and the Instituto Costarricense del Deporte y la Recreacion.

The riders have the opportunity to request and attend the analysis of the B sample.

In accordance with UCI Anti-Doping Rules, the riders have been provisionally suspended until the adjudication of the matter.

At this stage of the procedure, the UCI will not comment any further on any of these cases.


(*) CERA and EPO are classified as “Peptide Hormones, Growth Factors, Related Substances and Mimetics” as per the World Anti-Doping Prohibited List.
 
Jun 27, 2013
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Yes, Villalobos in Costa Rica is like Gaviria in Colombia or Nguyen in Vietnam. A very large part of the population have that surname.
There's even a Villalobos riding for a team named Villalobos (no relation)

This one who tested positive is not the one who won a stage in Argentina last week, in fact he's never raced outside Costa Rica as far as I can tell
 
Re:

GuyIncognito said:
Yes, Villalobos in Costa Rica is like Gaviria in Colombia or Nguyen in Vietnam. A very large part of the population have that surname.
There's even a Villalobos riding for a team named Villalobos (no relation)

This one who tested positive is not the one who won a stage in Argentina last week, in fact he's never raced outside Costa Rica as far as I can tell
He has. In fact, he's the reigning champion of the U23 Pan American games (CRI) and came 2nd in Juegos Centroamericanos.
 

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