Motor doping thread

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Mar 13, 2009
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Benotti69 said:
remember when Ryder 'crap on epo' Hesjedal said

"It's the stupidest thing. It's the most ridiculous thing I've ever heard of, It's not possible. It's just not possible"

that new trek of his has a massive down tube!

lady macbeth

doth

pro

test

2

hard
 
May 26, 2010
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Femke van den Driessche's brother is under a suspension for EPO. Ironically her team has "No Drugs" jersey logo
 
Oct 16, 2010
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hrotha said:
sniper said:
hrotha said:
It remains to be seen how easy it was to detect. Everybody can put a motor in their bike. Avoiding detection (which is what makes it feasible in a professional context) is a different matter altogether.

it doesn't matter if it's technologically possible.
motordoping is ethically so far out that nobody would even consider it.
doping, yes, motordoping, nah.
:rolleyes:
Hey, you tell that to whoever argued that. I always questioned its feasibility, not pro riders' willingness to exploit something illegal. Closest thing to that I ever said was that it was likely to be seen as much worse than doping within the peloton.
and that in itself isn't a bad argument, to be fair.
but the evidence of motorization has been so overwhelming (regardless of Femke van Driesschen) that it easily outweighs/ed any ethical counterargument.
 
As much as I've sadly enough accepted medical doping as part of the game to increase your OWN power ...

I ain't gonna accept any cheating with motors anytime. This is bike racing. Not motorbike racing.

I certainly hope the UCI's got the same view on it and fights just this one very hard!

I would rate Vaughters & co hypocrite enough to truly believe that mechanical doping at least ain't got no bad influence on the riders health and ain't that sleazy because of that. He's such a goof and ain't got no clue about true cycling passion after all!
 
Re: Re:

sniper said:
hrotha said:
sniper said:
hrotha said:
It remains to be seen how easy it was to detect. Everybody can put a motor in their bike. Avoiding detection (which is what makes it feasible in a professional context) is a different matter altogether.

it doesn't matter if it's technologically possible.
motordoping is ethically so far out that nobody would even consider it.
doping, yes, motordoping, nah.
:rolleyes:
Hey, you tell that to whoever argued that. I always questioned its feasibility, not pro riders' willingness to exploit something illegal. Closest thing to that I ever said was that it was likely to be seen as much worse than doping within the peloton.
and that in itself isn't a bad argument, to be fair.
but the evidence of motorization has been so overwhelming (regardless of Femke van Driesschen) that it easily outweighs/ed any ethical counterargument.

C'mon sniper. "Overwhelming evidence?" Until today the most it's been is "very suspicious."
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Re: Re:

hrotha said:
sniper said:
and that in itself isn't a bad argument, to be fair.
but the evidence of motorization has been so overwhelming (regardless of Femke van Driesschen) that it easily outweighs/ed any ethical counterargument.
"Overwhelming evidence"? Lal.

MarkvW said:
C'mon sniper. "Overwhelming evidence?" Until today the most it's been is "very suspicious."

If you have filmcrews filming how it's being done, installed, used in competition, and multiple unrelated sources including pro's telling they know it's been/being used, etc., you don't find that overwhelming?
 
May 26, 2010
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Re: Re:

MarkvW said:
sniper said:
hrotha said:
sniper said:
hrotha said:
It remains to be seen how easy it was to detect. Everybody can put a motor in their bike. Avoiding detection (which is what makes it feasible in a professional context) is a different matter altogether.

it doesn't matter if it's technologically possible.
motordoping is ethically so far out that nobody would even consider it.
doping, yes, motordoping, nah.
:rolleyes:
Hey, you tell that to whoever argued that. I always questioned its feasibility, not pro riders' willingness to exploit something illegal. Closest thing to that I ever said was that it was likely to be seen as much worse than doping within the peloton.
and that in itself isn't a bad argument, to be fair.
but the evidence of motorization has been so overwhelming (regardless of Femke van Driesschen) that it easily outweighs/ed any ethical counterargument.

C'mon sniper. "Overwhelming evidence?" Until today the most it's been is "very suspicious."

Casani presented a bike with a motor at Il Giro in 2010/11?

That the UCI were x-raying bikes is overwhelming evidence as well.
 
Jul 5, 2009
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Re: Re:

sniper said:
hrotha said:
sniper said:
and that in itself isn't a bad argument, to be fair.
but the evidence of motorization has been so overwhelming (regardless of Femke van Driesschen) that it easily outweighs/ed any ethical counterargument.
"Overwhelming evidence"? Lal.

MarkvW said:
C'mon sniper. "Overwhelming evidence?" Until today the most it's been is "very suspicious."

If you have filmcrews filming how it's being done, installed, used in competition, and multiple unrelated sources including pro's telling they know it's been/being used, etc., you don't find that overwhelming?

Dude. There's companies out there that let you buy complete systems online... It's been not just feasible, but practical and affordable since 2010.

John Swanson
 
Oct 16, 2010
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hrotha said:
It's not evidence that Cancellara in particular used it.
agreed.
"overwhelming" applies to the evidence of motordoping in competitive cycling (amateurs and/or pros), not to cancellara 2010 in particular.

That said, the evidence of the feasibility of motorization ad 2010 imo does add to the body of circumstantial evidence against Cance 2010.
 
Jun 2, 2015
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These bike motors are real and have been commercially available for years. With electronic shifting bikes with batteries are not even going to be questioned. In a CX race one can change a bike every lap-1/2 lap ie every 5-10 mins. Would seem like the perfect discipline for this form of cheating. Also would be super impactful to get a boost given the nature of the race long effort cross requires. Count me NOT surprised.
 
Aug 7, 2010
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Re: Re:

Benotti69 said:
hrotha said:
It remains to be seen how easy it was to detect. Everybody can put a motor in their bike. Avoiding detection (which is what makes it feasible in a professional context) is a different matter altogether.

Brown envelopes help hide motors easily.

Aaron Brown envelopes.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Benotti69 said:
Femke van den Driessche's brother is under a suspension for EPO. Ironically her team has "No Drugs" jersey logo
interesting.
What are the chances of an EPO positive?
What are the chances of a motor positive?
What are the chances of both occurring in one and the same family?
Just saying it would seem she was targeted.

Cue UCI pretending how this case shows that they are on top of things and that the controls work.

to anyone, what kind of ban is she facing?
 
Re:

Benotti69 said:
Rider, Thomas Pidcock, in the Men's Junior CX WC race came from 32nd on the last lap to finish 5th!!!

That's not true.

Pidcock started the last lap in 12th in the worst case, I don't know now in certain, but I am absolutely certain that he was for some time in a group which was fighting for a top-8 position at least.
 
Indeed, cross is the perfect prey for this technology. And women's races even more so, being sexistly shorter still, which the rider power output AND weight are smaller. The smallest of engines and batteries is going to be the difference between mid field and win (and then some), if the rider can steer well.
 
May 26, 2010
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Ricco' said:
Benotti69 said:
Rider, Thomas Pidcock, in the Men's Junior CX WC race came from 32nd on the last lap to finish 5th!!!

That's not true.

Pidcock started the last lap in 12th in the worst case, I don't know now in certain, but I am absolutely certain that he was for some time in a group which was fighting for a top-8 position at least.

I heard it from the commentators. They made a big thing of it how he came from 32nd on last lap.
 
May 26, 2010
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At Koppenberg Cross Femke van den Driessche's time up Koppenberg was 5% faster then all female Pro's. Only 21 sec behind Sven Nys.
 
Just found out about this. A 19-year old girl for crying out loud. You know I actually kind of feel sorry for her. As a 19-year old it's perfectly reasonable that you're not able to fully understand the consequences of your actions yet. Sure you know you're doing something wrong, but you often underestimate the impact it might have when you get caught.

Now, what's totally baffling me is why nobody from her entourage talked this out of her head (assuming it was her idea in the first place). As a mature person, what kind of total idiot you must be to go along with this and put such a young girl in this kind of position?