Music! What are you listening to now?

Page 104 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Tank Engine said:
29. Simon and Garfunkel - Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme
The remaining artists on my have all been at least heavily influenced by folk music. When I was growing up, we didn't have a large amount of recorded music (at least by my present standards, some early Beatles, folk and Abba). On long car journeys when “The Boxer” came on, we'd start singing in raucous harmony. In my teenage years, Simon and Garfunkel became about the only thing that my parents listened to that I could bear. Under the lilting melodies and harmonies, there often lay the political radicalism of the 60s (e.g. their version of Silent Night from this album which I posted recently). “For Emily ...” is just a straightforward beautiful ballad full of longing.

Simon and Garfunkel - For Emily, whenever I may find her
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhRwNqybWog
Just bought their soundtrack to the movie "The Graduate" with Dustin Hoffman. "The Sound of Silence" is one of my all time favorite tunes.:)
 
Jul 16, 2011
1,551
0
0
cycling and music

pig pen said:
Of course I have to "fourth" that.

A couple of items of cycling related music news. Paul Heaton (formerly of the Housemartins and Beautiful South) is going on a 2,500 mile cycle/gig tour of the UK and Ireland (that's 4,000km in proper units).
http://road.cc/content/news/48456-paul-heaton-getting-back-his-bike-another-uk-tour-next-may

Secondly, an excuse (as if I needed one) to post one of my favourite albums from 2011. King Creosote and Jon Hopkins - Diamond Mine. The former is a folk singer from Fife region, on the east coast of Scotland, and the latter is a composer from London. Together, they have made an understated, tender "ambient folk" album

BBC 6 music programme with King Creosote and Jon Hopkins on their Mercury Music Prize Nominated album Diamond Mine (XX the 2010 winners occupy the first 5 mins, the cycling story comes in at 20 mins)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b013dxs0/The_Complete_Mercurys_King_Creosote_and_Jon_Hopkins_on_Diamond_Mine./

A couple of youtube links

Bats in the Attic - Reflections on the passing of time by a middle-aged cyclist (now why can I relate to that?)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpDz-ROT58A&feature=related

John Taylor's Month Away - A song about King Creosote's neighbour, a fisherman, and his hatred of spending a month at sea, but who can't cope socially on land.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEoLnijDvv0
 
Oct 30, 2009
527
0
0
Tank Engine said:
Secondly, an excuse (as if I needed one) to post one of my favourite albums from 2011. King Creosote and Jon Hopkins - Diamond Mine. The former is a folk singer from Fife region, on the east coast of Scotland, and the latter is a composer from London. Together, they have made an understated, tender "ambient folk" album

A couple of youtube links

Bats in the Attic - Reflections on the passing of time by a middle-aged cyclist (now why can I relate to that?)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpDz-ROT58A&feature=related

John Taylor's Month Away - A song about King Creosote's neighbour, a fisherman, and his hatred of spending a month at sea, but who can't cope socially on land.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jEoLnijDvv0
I'm buying that album sooner rather than later. Bats in the Attic is especially beautiful.

At the moment I'm listening to Vashti Bunyan's album Lookaftering. I can certainly appreciate its beauty, but it hasn't hit me as hard as I expected. What is hitting me hard, though, is Vashti's collaboration with fellow folksters Vetiver. This one is called Sleep a Million Years, and it's...i don't know. Just check it out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hqMVDw8_l0

Still working of my next installment on the 33 recommendations. No room for neither Bunyan or Vetiver, though (or King Creosote - yet).
 
Sep 7, 2010
770
0
0
El Pistolero said:
I've known them for ages :p

Was really popular music when I was a kid(and I think you're not much older than me). Yeah, they have some good "skater" music :D
Luckily we have all different taste. I've always hated pop-punk like the plague.
 
Jul 16, 2011
1,551
0
0
mortand said:
I'm buying that album sooner rather than later. Bats in the Attic is especially beautiful.

At the moment I'm listening to Vashti Bunyan's album Lookaftering. I can certainly appreciate its beauty, but it hasn't hit me as hard as I expected. What is hitting me hard, though, is Vashti's collaboration with fellow folksters Vetiver. This one is called Sleep a Million Years, and it's...i don't know. Just check it out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hqMVDw8_l0

Still working of my next installment on the 33 recommendations. No room for neither Bunyan or Vetiver, though (or King Creosote - yet).
Glad you liked it. King Creosote has been on my radar for a while, but this is the first time I've bought anything and the more I hear the album, the more enchanted I get.

I liked the Vetiver. I'm not surprised you thought of her. Both Vashti and King Creosote have a very soft and fragile timbre in their voices.
 
Jun 7, 2011
59
0
0
Thomsena said:
Luckily we have all different taste. I've always hated pop-punk like the plague.
that was a nice way of putting it ;)
nobody can like everything. now it's my turn: i can't stand prog rock nor fusion,
no matter how excellent joe satriani or john mc laughlin play their guitars :D

did i mention how much i like this thread? makes me behave like a teenager.
found andrew bird in its depths, and think it's awesome what he does with violine, effect board, whistling, glockenspiel.. with great charisma on stage
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRk2iHkOcNE
so i took a holiday the week in march he does 4 gigs in europe - ok, london is sold out, now looking for train/flight to bruxelles, a'dam or paris :)
 
Oct 30, 2009
527
0
0
I'm listening to kent, which is always a downer, but in a good way. More importantly here's my next installment of favorite albums.

12. The The - Dusk (1993). One of the greatest tracks on this marvellous album is called 'Bluer Than Midnight'. That's quite a fitting title. Obviously, 'Dusk' is too. This is dark and gloomy, not that one would expect otherwise from Matt Johnson. Besides being dark and gloomy, it introduced one of the true evergreens of the decade. Check it out here:
Slow Emotion Replay

13. The Posies - Frosting on the Beater (1993). Now here's a way to set the bar high from the start: The first three tracks are just about as perfect as edgy guitar pop can get, and although the rest of the album isn't equally as mindblowing, it's pretty damn close. I've never understood why The Posies haven't made a bigger commercial splash. It's sad really, but I think they'll do alright. At least they're still around touring relentlessly and releasing an album from time to time.
Solar Sister

14. Counting Crows - August and Everything After (1993). As uncool as it may be, this one still works for me. This album might've been what kickstarted my interest in the folky-rootsy americana thing back in the mid-90's. And yeah, we all know the one about Mr. Jones, who wishes he was just a little bit more funky than Bob Dylan, and although I surprisingly still enjoy that song, there are better and more representative tracks to sit and sob to. This one, for instance:
Raining in Baltimore

15. Red House Painters - Red House Painters aka Rollercoaster (1993). Speaking of sobbing, here's 80 more minutes of it. 8½ of those are called 'Katy Song', and is the best damn song ever written. There, I said it. Mark Kozelek may be rude and gruff sometimes, but man! he can write a song, that'll tear the most thick-skinned man apart. And then do it again. And again.
Katy Song
 
Sep 7, 2010
770
0
0
Kent is always worth a listen. Though the majority of the songs aren't english written they do reach its audience. I'm quite a fan. 'Den Döda Vinkeln', 'Pärlor', 'Kärleken Väntar' and 'Våga Vara Rädd' are some songs aren't they ;)

Also.

Still digging this brilliant song. Not that overwhelmed by the album as a whole but this particularly song was uplifting. And what a name for a band! ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vglxk3JbHnQ&ob=av2e
 
Oct 30, 2009
527
0
0
Yeah, I really like Kent. Used to be a huge fanboy around the time of Isola and Hagnesta Hill, but my interest slowly drifted elsewhere after Vapen & ammunition. Du & jag döden is very good, though, and I still enjoy their cold, Swedish melancholia once in a while. Socker, Innan allting tar slut and Cowboys are probably my favorite songs.
 
mortand said:
15. Red House Painters - Red House Painters aka Rollercoaster (1993). Speaking of sobbing, here's 80 more minutes of it. 8½ of those are called 'Katy Song', and is the best damn song ever written. There, I said it. Mark Kozelek may be rude and gruff sometimes, but man! he can write a song, that'll tear the most thick-skinned man apart. And then do it again. And again.
Katy Song
Libertine Seguros said:
The Red House Painters are one of the best bands ever.

Burning Blue Soul is the best The The album though. "Another Boy Drowning", classic. Does it every time.
Yeup. Red House Painters have the IT factor. I really like the 1996 "song for a blue guitar" off the "songs for a blue guitar" album. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ld_w8x-PAAI
 
Jul 16, 2011
1,551
0
0
fedaia said:
that was a nice way of putting it ;)
nobody can like everything. now it's my turn: i can't stand prog rock nor fusion,
no matter how excellent joe satriani or john mc laughlin play their guitars :D

did i mention how much i like this thread? makes me behave like a teenager.
found andrew bird in its depths, and think it's awesome what he does with violine, effect board, whistling, glockenspiel.. with great charisma on stage
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRk2iHkOcNE
so i took a holiday the week in march he does 4 gigs in europe - ok, london is sold out, now looking for train/flight to bruxelles, a'dam or paris :)
:cool: Have a good time.

As for what styles of music I don't dig: According to my normal eclectic style, I'll take a swing at classical, jazz and "popular"

Viennese waltzes - When crossing the Stefansplatz in Vienna and faced by those guys in 18th century costume selling tickets for Strauss/Mozart gigs, I'll have a steely "Don't waste your time" look in my eye.

Big Band Jazz - Surely that's a contradiction in terms
Dixie

What they now call RnB
Hip-Hop/Rap, although when it comes to rap there are a few exceptions.

Here is one guy who could rap, who like the Captain passed away last year

Gil Scott-Heron - The Revolution will not be televised
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGaoXAwl9kw

Edit: I forgot to mention poodle hair soft rock and various versions of Eurodisco
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS