Puerto bags to be handed over

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Mar 13, 2009
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Ryo Hazuki said:
blackcat said:
Ryo Hazuki said:
cancellara was also not a classical specialist back around 2005. he only had a 4th and an 8th place in roubaix and for the rest nothing. he was a timetrialist above all else. also he never had a fallback after fuentes in his level of competing, on the contrary, which makes it doubtful for me, although I'm not sticking my hand in the fire. others like basso, thomas dekker, beloved patriot gutierrez, mancebo and many more had a serious fallback
BS on Thomas Dekker, Dekker was a GC man, Tirreno A. not much scope on the one-day front, so if he is a classicomano in Fuentes fridge alliterationz, then... Spartacus would be too
what? where do I bring up thomas dekker as either a gc man or a classics rider? I name him asa 100% doper who had a fallback in his results after getting caught :eek:
but was not TD named as an option for the classicomano fuentes appellation
 
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Ryo Hazuki said:
LaFlorecita said:
Ryo Hazuki said:
oh god, how hard is it to read? his father is italian, his mother is german swiss, he is born in german switzerland, raised in german switzerland, german is his mother tongue and still his first language. he was given a german name as well

enough?
You replied to someone who wrote that he is of Italian descent with "he is a German Schweizer". That doesn't take away that he is of Italian descent.
Fabian is second generation immigrant from Italy. His parents moved to Switzerland from the south of Italy.

here specially for you I bolded it, underlined it, everything.

it was claimed cancellara was a 2nd generation immigrant from italy which he clearly isn't, since his mother is (german) swiss.

if in the netherlands a turkish male immigrant of the 60s had a child with a dutch woman, would that make the child a 2nd generation turkish immigrant, of course not. a ridiculous assumption and I make this example as it happened a lot
Actually technically it does and is used as such by the Dutch statistics bureau (CBS) if I am not mistaken.
 
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Benotti69 said:
TheSpud said:
Benotti69 said:
CheckMyPecs said:
Benotti69 said:
https://twitter.com/Noaldopaje/status/742691004357181440
You gotta admit Fuentes was a real moron when choosing nicknames sometimes.

What a surprise it was to find out "Sevillano" was Óscar Sevilla.
Doping was and still is part of the culture of sport. Fuentes obviously felt comfortable he was protected and if not at least ignored as a necessary part of Spanish sport. It did not matter the names, as DNA would find out whose blood it is when he got caught. I dont think Fuentes suffered too much. Some of the athletes have, Ullrich massively.
Interested in your comment about Ullrich there Benotti. Why would you say he has suffered massively? He was as guilty as hell and deserved what he got.
Suffered financially, gone from the sport.........He was guilty. I dont deny that. But compared to the Garmin crew and others he got done big time.

Piti still rode, Basso, Scarponi, Schlecks, Canc, Contador etc.........sadly anti doping and its punishments are about on a par with levels of doping!
Ok - I see what you mean
 
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veji11 said:
Even if bans couldn't be formally given, organisers could refuse letting team with those riders ride their races, effectively ending their careers. This would be a good thing. Cheaters have to pay, and it would be hilarious if instead of proper sentencing because of sstatute of limitation, they ended up paying the price by being shunted aside by their teams, unable to race, basically bullied out of their job omerta style.... ironic.
An ill thought out and irrational post - You can't can be convicted of cheating unless,you go through tribunal hearings, which wont happen because the statute of limitations has passed .

How could these riders be shunted off their teams seeing some in the administrative part of teams have previously been convicted of doping.
 
Mar 25, 2013
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Some worried athletes out there.

The bags of blood, plasma and red blood cells gathered in a 2006 raid at the office of Dr. Eufemiano Fuentes have been in the possession of the World Anti-Doping Agency and the International Cycling Union since last Thursday.

Thanks to this evidence, it will be now possible to identify the athletes who underwent clandestine transfusions to improve their performance. Most of those involved in the doping case called Operation Puerto are cyclists, but Fuentes also testified that his clients included athletes in tennis and soccer, as well as track and field.
http://www.elespanol.com/espana/20160705/137736924_0.html
 
Jan 20, 2010
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I wonder how long it takes WADA and UCI to issue a statement about targeting and finding the owners, who logically will be all cyclists.
 
The Puerto case is big news in the Spanish press, here is a very informative article which just came out:

http://www.mundodeportivo.com/mas-deporte/20160706/402992668496/entregadas-las-bolsas-de-sangre-de-la-operacion-puerto.html

"Después de diez años de proceso, la Justicia española permitió el pasado 14 de junio que las pruebas recogidas en la operación policial que destapó la megatrama de dopaje fueran entregadas a las autoridades deportivas para su análisis. De esta forma, las decenas de clientes del polémico doctor, en su mayoría ciclistas, podrían ser finalmente identificadas sin género de dudas por medio del cotejo de ADN."

"On June 14, after ten years of proceedings, the Justices of the Spanish court allowed for the evidence recovered during the police operation, which had exposed the doping mega-conspiracy, to be handed over to the sports authorities for analysis. In this way, dozens of clients of the controversial doctor, mostly cyclists, have finally been identified, without any doubt, by means of DNA matching"

“El contenido de cada bolsa fue dividido en cuatro partes y, tras su identificación, cada muestra fue introducida en tubos. Finalmente, los tubos fueron distribuidos en cuatro maletines que se precintaron para preservar la cadena de custodia”

"The contents of each [blood] bag were divided into four portions, and after identification, each sample was stored in tubes. Finally, the tubes were distributed into four suitcases, each of which was sealed closed to preserve the chain of custody"

So, the identities of "dozens" of cyclists have already been identified by DNA genetic matching, not just by documents and circumstantial evidence. And someone really, really, does not want the proof to get away. With the quadruple-backup of the identified blood samples, each of which is in the safekeeping of four separate people.

Luigi
 
May 13, 2011
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Luigi, in other words, somebody is very concerned that someone else really wants the proof to go away. Cyclists can't be that powerful 10 years after the fact, so who want to dispose of the evidence?
 
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Random Direction said:
Luigi, in other words, somebody is very concerned that someone else really wants the proof to go away. Cyclists can't be that powerful 10 years after the fact, so who want to dispose of the evidence?
Therein lies the mystery, my friend. Calling on all Clinicians to diagnose this one !

Doctor in the house ?

As for the article, it says :
"se ha ejecutado de forma vertiginosa"

meaning [all of this is in my own translation] that the ruling of the Justices of the Spanish court was "executed at a dizzying pace". So having finally been given the samples, and the go-ahead to test them, the genetics labs were in a frenzy of activity, to get the DNA matching done ASAP. Why ?

It implies that in less than three weeks from Jun 14 - July 5, they did more than three dozen sets of blood samples.

What the article literally says is there were "dozens of clients, mostly cyclists", not dozens of cyclists. From what I read before, there were about 24 pro cyclists whose blood was on ice, and then the rest were from other disciplines such as track-and-field, distance running, etc. Perhaps "two dozen cyclists" could be accurate

From the general point-of-view of prosecutors, who are in a sense staking their reputations on a legal outcome, of course they would like to nail this case. But I don't know specifically who was doing the work and vested interests of any other parties to this

Luigi
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Luigi, thanks for the translations. Very promising indeed.

Question: If all the analyses and DNA matching have already been done, why are UCI and WADA now in the possession of the bags? (per Gooner's link)

More generally, I still very much doubt UCI and WADA are interested in exposing those names.
More like the opposite. WADA (especially under Reedie) are nothing but a wolf in sheeps clothes.
I'm assuming massive pressure behind the scenes to shove the names under the carpet.
 
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sniper said:
Luigi, thanks for the translations. Very promising indeed.

Question: If all the analyses and DNA matching have already been done, why are UCI and WADA now in the possession of the bags? (per Gooner's link)

More generally, I still very much doubt UCI and WADA are interested in exposing those names.
More like the opposite. WADA (especially under Reedie) are nothing but a wolf in sheeps clothes.
I'm assuming massive pressure behind the scenes to shove the names under the carpet.
I sure hope that there will be sufficient pressure brought on UCI and WADA to expose the names of the athletes involved. That being said, I don't trust them at all to release them. Sad.
 
May 26, 2010
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I really hope that these athletes tape the conversations between themselves and WADA.

I guess WADA want to make hay........
 
May 26, 2010
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thehog said:
Benotti69 said:
I really hope that these athletes tape the conversations between themselves and WADA.

I guess WADA want to make hay........
Into the safe hands of Sir Criag Reedie.... should be fun to watch :lol:
Reedie just hit the jackpot!
 
Regarding 'clasicomano' and 'clasicomano Luigi' - if one of them has been proven to be Juan-Antonio Flecha, that would be quite awkward at this time. Since Flecha is a Eurosport commentator on this current Tour de France race

If the definitive proof comes out, Cancellara is either disgraced or exonerated. I lean towards the latter possibility, with the expectation that neither 'clasicomano' or 'clasicomano Luigi' are Cancellara's blood. But who knows...

In any case, some impostor has been using my name as a code-word, in this doping mega-conspiracy.
Of course I cannot stand for my good name to be sullied in this manner, and I will not rest until justice is served.

Luigi
 
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sniper said:
Luigi, thanks for the translations. Very promising indeed.

Question: If all the analyses and DNA matching have already been done, why are UCI and WADA now in the possession of the bags? (per Gooner's link)

More generally, I still very much doubt UCI and WADA are interested in exposing those names.
More like the opposite. WADA (especially under Reedie) are nothing but a wolf in sheeps clothes.
I'm assuming massive pressure behind the scenes to shove the names under the carpet.
Can we at least get the code names?
I would enjoy listening to a press conference in which the names of athlete's pets were implicated in the scandal.
 

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