Steven Kruijswijk

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Maaaaaaaarten said:
Oh and btw, if Kruijswijk get's his normal third week peak compared to the level that he has now, he will win the Giro. Just saying. I'm not super confident that'll he'll improve as much as he normally does though so I'm not necessarily predicting that he will.
Of course he wont improve equally much in the third week as usual when he is already this good. That would be ridiculous.

The question is if he can keep his usual high third week level or if he will fade away. I think he will be strong throughout and he does have an outside shot at the podium imo
 
Maaaaaaaarten, yup, hence the bit about fossilized spellings in place names compared to surnames :). "Kruijswijk" is a lot less hardcore than "Worchester" in terms of non-standard orthography.

Zinoviev Letter, I agree. I was only addressing the comparison with odd English place names.
 
Maaaaaaaarten said:
French and other Germanic languages except English have similar types of vowels (i.e. front rounded vowels), but generally they're quite uncommon so it's not surprising that people with English as a native language, find it difficult to pronounce. If you speak French, you might be able to pronounce <ui> (or <uij> in this case) by saying the French <oe> and the French <u> after each other like a diphthong.
Actually, many Francophones believe that <oe> sounds like Danish <ö> in French but it seems like a language abuse. <Oe> in French is an equivalent of <é> but nowadays only a minority respect that pronunciation rule. The French equivalent for Dutch <ui> would typically be <euil>, like in "Montreuil", I think. ;)
 
Oct 23, 2011
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Echoes said:
Actually, many Francophones believe that <oe> sounds like Danish <ö> in French but it seems like a language abuse. <Oe> in French is an equivalent of <é> but nowadays only a minority respect that pronunciation rule. The French equivalent for Dutch <ui> would typically be <euil>, like in "Montreuil", I think. ;)
I didn't know this actually. But it looks like you have a good point. Wikipedia at least says that <oe> was often used in borrowings from Latin and Greek in which it was pronounced [e].

I was thinking of words like soeur, coeur etc. but it appears that this is because it's <oeu> not <oe>.

And yes <euil> is very similar to Dutch <ui> actually! <eu> is pronounced like <oeu> I guess (which makes some sense if <oe> = <é>), so <euil> becomes a diphthong that's quite similar to Dutch <ui>.

Anyway, maybe French orthography is getting a bit off-topic, but thanks for the correction! :)
 
Echoes said:
Actually, many Francophones believe that <oe> sounds like Danish <ö> in French but it seems like a language abuse. <Oe> in French is an equivalent of <é> but nowadays only a minority respect that pronunciation rule. The French equivalent for Dutch <ui> would typically be <euil>, like in "Montreuil", I think. ;)
To pull this thread even further from Steven Kruijswijk for a moment; does this mean that if we were to follow proper rules for pronounciation, Tommy V would have his surname pronounced Véckler? Or maybe his name originates from German... :confused:
 
Maaaaaaaarten said:
I didn't know this actually. But it looks like you have a good point. Wikipedia at least says that <oe> was often used in borrowings from Latin and Greek in which it was pronounced [e].

I was thinking of words like soeur, coeur etc. but it appears that this is because it's <oeu> not <oe>.
Yes, these are particular cases in which the "o" is silent. It's a normal "-eur" ending. Well in the case of the "-eur" ending, you pronounce it "schwa + r" in French, unlike in Dutch in which it remains <ör>, while in all other instances, French <eu> is Danish <ö>. In "coeur", the "o" makes sure that you have a hard "c" sounding like a "k" otherwise it would sound like an "s". Well I keep saying I would never have been able to learn French if it were not my mother tongue but I know that you are learning it, so I took the time to respond. ;)

But in words like "Oedipe" or "oesophage" ["esophagus"], the <oe> is often pronounced <ö>, which is a mistake. To be honest, it sometimes irritates me. :p

Squire said:
To pull this thread even further from Steven Kruijswijk for a moment; does this mean that if we were to follow proper rules for pronounciation, Tommy V would have his surname pronounced Véckler? Or maybe his name originates from German...
Yes, he's got Alsacian roots, so German.
 
Apr 12, 2015
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Re:

staubsauger said:
Kruijswijk ain't even pronounced the same way in Twente as it is in the Randstad. Especially a native speaker should know that!
I was born in Twente and now live in the Randstad and still pronounce it the same way :p
 
Re:

staubsauger said:
Kruijswijk ain't even pronounced the same way in Twente as it is in the Randstad. Especially a native speaker should know that!
That's merely a phonetic, not phonemic, difference. If you look closely, you'll notice Maaaaaaaarten did carefully distinguish between // (phonemic transcription) and [] (phonetic transcription) when discusing the pronunciation of "Kruijswijk".

Also, what you said applies to like every single language ever.
 
Jan 10, 2010
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Looked great in todays stage....rock solid!

"Coat Hangar Shoulders" according to Sean Kelly in commentary.....he does have broad shoulders compared to the other GC riders in todays group.

How is his TT form??
 
I didnt follow closely him last year at the begining, but analysing his Giro he had just a bad day in the 4 th stage, La Spezia, when he lost 7 minutes with the favourites, I dont know if something happen...

He was second in 9th stage in a break who allowed him to take 1 minute, so he was at a good level from the middle of the Giro, not just at the end.

I think he has started better this year, maybe becouse the start in his country, but it is not easy to say if he will be even stronger than last year in the harder stages. If he is, he count even to win the overall, but I dont think so.

He put in the ITT 1,5 minutes to Uran, but he wasnt never ok after to start just finishing an illness, so I think tomorrow Uran will put to him one minute.

Anyway, for sure, Kruijswijk will do a good ITT, and the Giro is to be always well, no more.
 
Re:

Dekker_Tifosi said:
If you look at all of Kruijswijk's GT's, barring the Vuelta (where for some reason he never did well), he always rides his best in the 3rd week. So I expect him to do well there

It is true, but surprisingly he did better opening ITT last year in Tour de France than Froome and Contador...:O In fact, Uran and him rode the Giro and starting better than Contador...although this is not for this thread...

He was better in Alps than Pyrynees, but miot much better, just in one stage, Pra Loup...

I had as well that Idea that he is a man for third week, like Hesjedal, and it is, but no so much as I though maybe...

In his other top 10 Giro, 2011, he wanst bad at the begining...but it looks like if at the begining he is better in medium mountains stages than in the big ones (Etna), and he is better in the long stages, for Amador is similar...

They are endurace riders.

What I mean is that Kruijs... has ever been good in long medium mountains stages in the first week. Ço of coure, he will be good at the end, maybe better than ever, but I dont expect much better. I expect a similar level than last year, wich was great anyway, close to Contador.

This year he has a team working very well for him, and that is important.
 
He's always been the Dutch Basso since his Tour de Suisse stage win in Lichtenstein! A pure diesel that's tailor made for the savage cols of Italy!

The medical problem sadly enough interrupted his development big time. But now he's back as it seems better than ever.

He fully focused his early season on building peak shape for the Tour of Italy. Also he recognized the tt course in spring. Trained a lot to improve his hilly tt ability.

If he's able to handle the pressure he might become the true dangerman instead of Zakarocket!
 

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