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Tennis

Page 120 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Oct 16, 2010
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Multiple options. Succesful matchfixing. Or maybe he borrowed the money from Everink in return for physical services.
Anyway,
Sounds like they had a nice little match fixing & gambling scam going on among the three of them.
But why would Haase go along in this game of match fixing and poker.
Did either Everink or Mark have something on him to blackmail him?
Or was Haase in it for the thrill, or just making extra money from this?
So many qyuestions.
What a fascinating triangle.
 
Jan 30, 2016
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So far I have no reason to believe Everink was involved in matchfixing.

Mark also played live poker in homegames (with other tennis players and Everink) as well as in casinos. According to sources he had a debt of about 80.000 euro to Everink. Apparantly he wanted the money back and threatened to out his gambling problem.

I would find it strange if Everink would borrow money by sending to Mark's e-wallet.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Re:

Tienus said:
So far I have no reason to believe Everink was involved in matchfixing.
no good reason to discard it either. At the very least he must have known about it seeing how the three of them hung out together.
 
Jan 30, 2016
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Re: Re:

sniper said:
Tienus said:
So far I have no reason to believe Everink was involved in matchfixing.
no good reason to discard it either. At the very least he must have known about it seeing how the three of them hung out together.
I can think of one good reason. If I would throw away a match I would make sure that the minimun required amount of people knew about it.
 
Jan 30, 2016
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This is the list of transfer requests from Mark that pokernews found out about:

11 december 2015: $10.000 Skrill for PokerStars
30 november 2015: $9.000 Skrill for PokerStars
26 november 2015: $30.000 Neteller for Skrill or PokerStars
19 november 2015: $8.000 Skrill for PokerStars
9 november 2015: $5.000 Skrill for PokerStars
31 oktober 2015: $1.600 Skrill for PokerStars
28 oktover 2015: $620 Skrill for PokerStars
22 oktober 2015: $3.000 Skrill for PokerStars
21 oktober 2015: €2.000 Netteller for PokerStars
17 augustus 2015: $2.000 Skrill for PokerStars
20 juli 2015: €2.000 Neteller for Skrill or PokerStars
29 april 2015: $1.000 Skrill for PokerPokerStars or Neteller
24 april 2015: $1.000 Skrill for Neteller
10 maart 2015: €1.500 Neteller for PokerStars
21 juli 2015: €1.500 Neteller for PokerStars
20 juli 2014: €2.000 cash for PokerPokerStars
9 april 2013: $1.000 PokerStars for Neteller or Skrill

His request on the 26th of November is very strange as you can transfer from Neteller to Skrill for a 1,5% fee.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Re: Re:

Tienus said:
sniper said:
Tienus said:
So far I have no reason to believe Everink was involved in matchfixing.
no good reason to discard it either. At the very least he must have known about it seeing how the three of them hung out together.
I can think of one good reason. If I would throw away a match I would make sure that the minimun required amount of people knew about it.
Sure, maybe Haase only told Mark, but then what are the odds that Mark didn't also tell Everink.
These guys were watching soccer together, visiting tournaments together, borrowing money from each other.
Although you have a point, it's still far fetched, imo, to assume business man and close friend Everink was not in the know.

Of course, whether Everink actively participated/benefited from it is another question.
But here too, no apriori reason to assume he didn't.

Match fixing might turn out to be a red herring in the case of Everink, but i hope the investigators will not dismiss it beforehand.
 
You are claiming the match fixing by Haase with his coach as almost a certainty, a given. There is not one iota of evidence that came to light so far to suggest match fixing is involved. Does that mean it isn't? No, but for now it is all mere speculation and should therefore be presented as such and should not be presented as fact. The leap of faith that Everink must have been in the know for something of which we are not even certain it happened, is all a bit too much speculation imho.

Should match fixing be dismissed as possible contributing factor? Hell no and I highly doubt whether the police and/or prosecution would have any reason to practice omertà in this respect or at least I have nog grounds to believe they will sweep things under the carpet once found in a murder case (police and prosecution tend to take murder rather seriously). So fine to speculate for now but also let's wait and see what facts will be presented in the end before we try to reach any form conclusions.

Personally I wouldn't be surprised if Everink did get wind of something ontoward and tried to leverage that to get his money back. As to the money loaned itself, Everink was wealthy and I so no reason why he couldn't have lend a friend money if that friend was in a financial squeeze for whatever reason. That in itself is no grounds to speculate about Everink's motives (if any) just yet.
 
Jan 30, 2016
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Re:

GJB123 said:
You are claiming the match fixing by Haase with his coach as almost a certainty, a given. There is not one iota of evidence that came to light so far to suggest match fixing is involved. Does that mean it isn't? No, but for now it is all mere speculation and should therefore be presented as such and should not be presented as fact. The leap of faith that Everink must have been in the know for something of which we are not even certain it happened, is all a bit too much speculation imho.

Should match fixing be dismissed as possible contributing factor? Hell no and I highly doubt whether the police and/or prosecution would have any reason to practice omertà in this respect or at least I have nog grounds to believe they will sweep things under the carpet once found in a murder case (police and prosecution tend to take murder rather seriously). So fine to speculate for now but also let's wait and see what facts will be presented in the end before we try to reach any form conclusions.

Personally I wouldn't be surprised if Everink did get wind of something ontoward and tried to leverage that to get his money back. As to the money loaned itself, Everink was wealthy and I so no reason why he couldn't have lend a friend money if that friend was in a financial squeeze for whatever reason. That in itself is no grounds to speculate about Everink's motives (if any) just yet.
Really? Thats not what I read in my own posts, I see it as a possibility and speculate about it. Off course I know that the money does not have to come from matchfixing.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Re: Re:

Tienus said:
GJB123 said:
You are claiming the match fixing by Haase with his coach as almost a certainty, a given. There is not one iota of evidence that came to light so far to suggest match fixing is involved. Does that mean it isn't? No, but for now it is all mere speculation and should therefore be presented as such and should not be presented as fact. The leap of faith that Everink must have been in the know for something of which we are not even certain it happened, is all a bit too much speculation imho.

Should match fixing be dismissed as possible contributing factor? Hell no and I highly doubt whether the police and/or prosecution would have any reason to practice omertà in this respect or at least I have nog grounds to believe they will sweep things under the carpet once found in a murder case (police and prosecution tend to take murder rather seriously). So fine to speculate for now but also let's wait and see what facts will be presented in the end before we try to reach any form conclusions.

Personally I wouldn't be surprised if Everink did get wind of something ontoward and tried to leverage that to get his money back. As to the money loaned itself, Everink was wealthy and I so no reason why he couldn't have lend a friend money if that friend was in a financial squeeze for whatever reason. That in itself is no grounds to speculate about Everink's motives (if any) just yet.
Really? Thats not what I read in my own posts, I see it as a possibility and speculate about it. Off course I know that the money does not have to come from matchfixing.
different scenarios don't exclude each other in this case.
I found Haase's most recent comments wrt the ATP match fixing scandal to be very telling.
Almost evidence. Especially compared to his comments on match fixing in 2014.
 
Re: Re:

Tienus said:
GJB123 said:
You are claiming the match fixing by Haase with his coach as almost a certainty, a given. There is not one iota of evidence that came to light so far to suggest match fixing is involved. Does that mean it isn't? No, but for now it is all mere speculation and should therefore be presented as such and should not be presented as fact. The leap of faith that Everink must have been in the know for something of which we are not even certain it happened, is all a bit too much speculation imho.

Should match fixing be dismissed as possible contributing factor? Hell no and I highly doubt whether the police and/or prosecution would have any reason to practice omertà in this respect or at least I have nog grounds to believe they will sweep things under the carpet once found in a murder case (police and prosecution tend to take murder rather seriously). So fine to speculate for now but also let's wait and see what facts will be presented in the end before we try to reach any form conclusions.

Personally I wouldn't be surprised if Everink did get wind of something ontoward and tried to leverage that to get his money back. As to the money loaned itself, Everink was wealthy and I so no reason why he couldn't have lend a friend money if that friend was in a financial squeeze for whatever reason. That in itself is no grounds to speculate about Everink's motives (if any) just yet.
Really? Thats not what I read in my own posts, I see it as a possibility and speculate about it. Off course I know that the money does not have to come from matchfixing.
My comment was directed at sniper not at you (sorry of the misunderstanding). Sniper can be quite enthusiastic in the way he presents his speculations (as facts). Imho, It is better to err on the side of caution especially when a murder is involved. But that is just my opinion off course
 
Oct 16, 2010
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It's also better to click "safely remove" before taking out your usb stick. But life is too short imo.
Erring on the side of caution, i'll leave that to the sports press.

We know protennis is a criminal maffia-esque cesspit even without stuff like this happening.
You said "almost a certainty". And indeed, that nicely sums up my views on Haase and match fixing.
Otoh, as i said earlier, i concede that in the particular case of Everink it might be a red herring.
I agree with you that there seems no reason for the police to apply omerta here, so we can be hopeful that they'll get to the bottom of this, although match fixing in particular seems pretty hard to prove.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Haase 2014:
Haase 2016:
"I can't do anything with these accusations. There is no proof whatsoever.
... This is bad journalism. It only damages the sport." http://www.nu.nl/tennis/4199454/haase-kan-weinig-met-berichten-matchfixing-in-tennis.html
He started working with Mark de J. in the course of 2014.
 
Jan 30, 2016
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Online poker has had many cheating scandals. For example:
-There have been superuser accounts, the holder of this account could see his opponent hole cards.
-Players computers have been hacked to be able to watch the screen of opponents during play
-Collusion has taken place
-Sites have been attacked by DDOS at critical times
-Bots have been playing

Every single time players where suspecting foul play and reported it to the site or to the gaming commision they where told everything was normal and the security team knew what they where doing. No difference here to the physical sport we are discussing in the clinic, the sites did not want bad publicity and they where making no less money due to the cheating. The difference is that good poker players have teamed up when they suspected foul play and with analyzing the data available been able to proof the scamming almost every single time. Good players analyze hands and statistics allot as it is their bread and butter.

The initial analyzing of the hands played by Mark are interesting. The way he lost over 60.000 is basically impossible unless he was doing it on purpose. You can only transfer small amounts weekly to other players on the pokerstars site (I believe 300 per 14 days) but you can obviously lose alot against a player on purpose. This is a post from a player that good Dutch players agree with:
Ben ik de enige die het heel verdacht/apart vindt dat iemand die blijkbaar extreem gokverslaafd is, wel de 'discipline' heeft om enkel 50 en 100 te spelen terwijl hij blijkbaar wel de beschikking had over grote sommen geld gezien zijn transfers en dus makkelijk eens shotje hoger had kunnen wagen? Hij heeft welgeteld 151 handen op 100+ gespeeld (HU even niet meegerekend). Verder heb ik in ver verleden weleens bijgehouden wat de gemiddelde slechte spelers nu zoal verloren en gemiddeld kwam dat uit op 35bb/100 met uitschieters naar 100bb/100. En nu heeft hier dus iemand 250+ bb/100 verloren over 30k+ handen (ook nog eens met PLO, waar geluksfactor groter is). En dan gaat het ook nog om iemand die volgens mij niet compleet debiel is maar in al die tijd totaal niet verbeterd is gezien zijn graph. Iets lijkt me hier niet te kloppen...
 
Jan 30, 2016
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His screen names both on the forums and pokersites have been outed.

He does not seem to bright, he got scammed at least twice with his fund transfers and he also posted his email on a puplic forum. There is now an english topic about him:
http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/29/news-views-gossip-sponsored-online-poker-report/dutch-tennis-coach-arrested-murder-had-gambling-debt-90k-lost-63k-pokerstars-1599237/
They will find out soon wheter he lost on purpose or not, if he didnt he probably set a record for loss rate.
 
It doesn't make sense to me. The stats he had indicate that he was just throwing money away. No idea why you'd continue to play with money you can't afford to lose. But then he might be an addict, in which case he probably would've gambled on a lot higher stakes. Psychological issues?

No idea how a guy like that could actually make you a better tennis player
 
Oct 16, 2010
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indeed i think it's safe to assume haase didn't hire him for tennis-technical reasons.

tienus, what could be the reason of him 'losing on purpose'?
 
Jun 21, 2015
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Jan 30, 2016
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I thought he was laundering money, based on his strange money transfers and the way he played. In every forum he tries to swap funds he raises questions about them. Players who played alot against him have spoken out now and it seems he was really losing due to his extremely bad play. Over a period of two and a half years he lost with a steady rate in over 70.000 hands. The strange thing is that his game never improved. He was a gambler for sure as he also played other games in casinos.

The first time he wanted to swap funds he made an account on a Dutch poker site and started a topic:
http://www.nederpoker.com/forum/topic/27195-stars-usd-for-neteller-eu-skrill-usd/
Forum members questioned his strange transfer request and also pointed out that there was a possibility of a middleman scam and linked to this example:
http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/19/high-stakes-pl-nl/serial-scammer-uses-me-unknown-middleman-1310885/
On the same day he thenposted in another forum with the swap request. His post was removed because it was not according the rules but he still managed to become victim of the middleman scam. He started a topic about it which makes an interesting read:
http://forumserver.twoplustwo.com/28/internet-poker/scammed-emailer-1320667/

He got scammed at least one more time last December.

I now think he did not lose on purpose but i still wonder where the money in the e-wallets came from.
 
May 14, 2010
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I'm not really hip to money laundering, so bear with me. How do you launder money by losing it?
 
Jan 30, 2016
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First you send me your money and I then lose it to you on purpose. You can now prove you have won the money playing poker.
 

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