The Iron Lady has passed away

Jun 16, 2009
19,657
1
0
What a sad day. Dislike or like her politics, you can not take away the fact that she had an enormous influence on the world we are living in today and where women are in society. She epitomised feminism more than most self-proclaimed feminists. This is due to the fact that she took feminism from what many feminists held it as a socially left-wing ideology to a far broader sense. She is an inspiration to someone like myself and is one of the most influential politicians of the 20th century. Many of the things she said back in her term as PM ring true today. She is rightfully and idol of conservatism, individual liberty and free markets. Most importantly, she had conviction.

Goodbye Margaret Thatcher :(

 
bless her

i recall withdrawing my labour in support of the miners..............happy afternoons in the pub

today i strolled over our old pit heap.............now nicely landscaped

won't shed a tear for the ol' tyrant

but given the choice i would prefer to hear that she was still live and kicking

Mark L
 
Jun 16, 2009
19,657
1
0
Driven by principle and conviction. Was one of the main people who was behind the opening up of the world economy and the free market.
 
auscyclefan94 said:
Driven by principle and conviction. Was one of the main people who was behind the opening up of the world economy and the free market.
Quick question: what percentage of people in her nation benefited from that opening up of the world economy and "free" market? (I thought it's been fairly well established in other threads that there's no such thing as a free market--you're not honestly still clinging to that chestnut are you? Non-Keynesian doesn't mean free.) There are differences between bitterness and a realism that's not exclusively self-serving.
 
Aug 5, 2012
2,290
0
0
I didn't liker her and I won't celebrate her death, but for some people she is seen as literally being personally responsible for ruining lives and families.
 
Jun 22, 2009
4,991
0
0
hrotha said:
Working-class people being bitter about what one of their worst enemies in recent history did? Who woulda thunk?
Indeed. And you didn't/don't have to be working class to have detested her.
 
I will not celebrate her death, nor will I mourn it. Having grown up in Britain while she was PM, her politics and beliefs certainly helped to shape my political leanings. For some she will be remembered with fondness but for many of my generation there will be little to no sadness. Her policies led to entire communites being ruined, to the extent that they have still not recovered. Families destroyed and torn apart.

My only sadness is for her family and the fact that she had to endure the agony of Alzheimers in her latter years. Having recently lost my own mother to this awful disease I would not wish it upon anyone.

may she rest in peace but I will shed no tears.
 
Oct 21, 2012
1,106
0
0
Vile woman.

Condolences to her family, though. People celebrating her death need to take a look at themselves. Mock it, take as much urine out of it as you like, but it's really a bit pathetic/contemptible to start throwing parties because an old woman died.
 
Mar 25, 2013
5,389
0
0
I despise her hugely.

Take the Hillsborough report recently which was very damning on her and her influence in covering up the police behaviour at the time and how the Liverpool fans were potrayed as the ones to blame. Her role in the initial first report at the time of the disaster led to over 20 years of stress for the families and friends who fought for the truth to be revealed.

Gerry Adams didn't pull any puches on her:

Margaret Thatcher did great hurt to the Irish and British people during her time as British Prime Minister.

Working class communities were devastated in Britain because of her policies.

Her role in international affairs was equally belligerent whether in support of the Chilean dictator Pinochet, her opposition to sanctions against apartheid South Africa; and her support for the Khmer Rouge.

Here in Ireland her espousal of old draconian militaristic policies prolonged the war and caused great suffering. She embraced censorship, collusion and the killing of citizens by covert operations, including the targeting of solicitors like Pat Finucane, alongside more open military operations and refused to recognise the rights of citizens to vote for parties of their choice.

Her failed efforts to criminalise the republican struggle and the political prisoners is part of her legacy.

It should be noted that in complete contradiction of her public posturing, she authorised a back channel of communications with the Sinn Féin leadership but failed to act on the logic of this.

Unfortunately she was faced with weak Irish governments who failed to oppose her securocrat agenda or to enlist international support in defence of citizens in the north.

Margaret Thatcher will be especially remembered for her shameful role during the epic hunger strikes of 1980 and ’81.

Her Irish policy failed miserably.
http://www.thejournal.ie/gerry-adams-margaret-thatcher-statement-sinn-fein-861693-Apr2013/
 
Oct 21, 2012
1,106
0
0
Typically, I find that Thatcher supporters are the kind of people that would throw their support behind anybody as long as they were anti-communist, regardless of what their other policies were. Suharto serves as a good example.

Political deaths are crap. I'm having my Facebook flooded by (young, Australian) people talking about it which is quite strange, because said people are usually very inactive politically, don't ever talk about politics and yet fixate on events that never had anything to do with their context of being sub-20 year olds in Australia.
 
Maggie was certainly a divisive politician, though at least you know what she stood for.

She did a lot of damage to parts of the UK that is true, but perhaps those changes would have happened anyway.

Never voted for her, wanted her out at the time and today I will neither mourn or celebrate.
 
Oct 30, 2011
2,642
0
0
auscyclefan94 said:
You post that song just as she has died? Class all the way...

Of course I am not going to the funeral.
To me she is the same in death as she was in life. Scum. If she doesn't want to be remembered for how bad a person she was, she should have been a better person.
 
Alphabet said:
Vile woman.

Condolences to her family, though. People celebrating her death need to take a look at themselves. Mock it, take as much urine out of it as you like, but it's really a bit pathetic/contemptible to start throwing parties because an old woman died.
People are allowed to celebrate someone's death. Whether that person was sufficiently evil to warrant it is another matter, but death is part of life and far from its darkest one.I don't see why people can't express happiness at it if that's how they feel. With someone like Thatcher her death is likely the last time discussion over here policies will be a matter of current affairs and public debate. I don't see why those who saw her in a very negative light should be excluded from the debate.
 
Oct 30, 2011
2,642
0
0
auscyclefan94 said:
What a sad day. Dislike or like her politics, you can not take away the fact that she had an enormous influence on the world we are living in today and where women are in society.
You cannot take away her influence on the world, but god I wish I could. A vile individual, who I will not mourn.

She epitomised feminism more than most self-proclaimed feminists. This is due to the fact that she took feminism from what many feminists held it as a socially left-wing ideology to a far broader sense.
You don't know what feminism is. It's not about being a woman and powerful, it's about challenging male-dominated structures of power and culture. She quite clearly did neither of those.

She is an inspiration to someone like myself and is one of the most influential politicians of the 20th century. Many of the things she said back in her term as PM ring true today.
You need to take a good long hard look at yourself son. She was a nasty, hate-filled woman and it is that hate that explains the negative reaction you see today. You can childishly describe it as "bitter", but I feel there are few better reasons to be bitter towards someone than that person doing their utmost to destroy much of what you hold dear, or what others hold dear.

She is rightfully and idol of conservatism, individual liberty and free markets.
She is an idol of negative liberty, and only in an economic sense. While Britain under her had the "freedom" to buy whatever you wanted and had lower taxes, there was a huge rise in homelessness and poverty, decreases in vital social housing and a chronic lack of investment in infrastructure. Not to mention her flawed economic policies sowed the seeds for today's troubles in this country.

Most importantly, she had conviction.
This should sort of go without saying, but conviction is only as good as the things you hold that conviction in. At the risk of being clichéd, convicted can be as much as a negative as it is a positive. Stalin, Mao, Hitler, Pol Pot, Pinochet (her good friend) and many others have all had "conviction". It is not a positive quality in and of itself.

Goodbye Margaret Thatcher :(
Goodbye indeed.
 
The Hitch said:
People are allowed to celebrate someone's death. Whether that person was sufficiently evil to warrant it is another matter, but death is part of life and far from its darkest one.I don't see why people can't express happiness at it if that's how they feel. With someone like Thatcher her death is likely the last time discussion over here policies will be a matter of current affairs and public debate. I don't see why those who saw her in a very negative light should be excluded from the debate.
The day she was kicked out of power was the day to celebrate, not today
 
Oct 30, 2011
2,642
0
0
del1962 said:
The day she was kicked out of power was the day to celebrate, not today
She can't hear it, she can't read it. If people are allowed to remember what they loved about someone, why can what they hated about them not be remembered too? It is absurd that we feel the need to conduct this posthumous whitewashing of a legacy.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY