The Marco Brenner is the next Remco Evenepoel thread

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He's been doing some crossing this winter, and won a ton in the lower fields. He was starting too far from the back to really be a threat to Thibau in the World Cups, but its been a good winter for Brenner. Recent interview with him suggests his main goals this year are Roubaix, Peace Race and the world title, although I fully expect him to dominate from start to finish really.
I noticed him in some CX results. Posted it in the CX forum's main topic. I didn't know (before) that he also did CX.
 
His father in this Augsburger Allgemeine Article from the end of November. It's also a good read about how he got into cycling, how driven he is and that he always has been super talented.

 
I don't think that's a good idea. Maybe Evenepoel is preemptively taking out future competitors this way (they seem to be following in his footsteps and assume the transition will be equally easy for them). But Brenner didn't win nearly as many races in the juniors as Evenepoel. The races he did win, was not nearly as dominant as Evenepoel, and he is a full 1.5 years younger than Evenepoel was at that point. He just turned 17 in august, while Evenepoel was about to turn 19 when his pro season started.
 
Technically Brenner can't turn pro before the 1st auf January 2021 anyway.
What does that mean? Can he race with the pros when he's not a pro? I assume not?

And re: Evenepoel - the Belgian won four races in his first junior year. Brenner won 19.
I think we should be comparing the last season they rode before skipping the U23, don't you? Or do you think it makes more sense to look at Evenepoel's season when he only started riding a bike?
 
His father in this Augsburger Allgemeine Article from the end of November. It's also a good read about how he got into cycling, how driven he is and that he always has been super talented.

Thank you.
 
Google translated it:

Augsburg's Marco Brenner is one of the greatest young hopefuls in German cycling. He will soon sign the first professional contract at the age of 17.

To explain why his son Marco is one of the greatest cycling talents worldwide at the age of 17, father Christian Brenner likes to tell the episode of his schooling. “A friend of ours said to him: Gell, now you have to learn to write, do arithmetic and read diligently. Marco then replied: I don't need that, I'm going to be a professional cyclist. ”Around ten years later, the time has come: In spring, the young road racing cyclist from Augsburg will sign a professional contract.

Where, that's not yet clear, because the name Brenner electrifies the scene. And not only since he won the bronze medal at the Junior World Championships in the time trial in Yorkshire in September as a 17-year-old among the 18-year-olds. "We are already communicating with a few teams, but it is not yet certain where I will go," says Marco. We, that's him, his father and the sports marketing agency Corso. If you look around on the homepage of the two owners João Correia and Ken Sommer, you will see that a specialist is taking care of Marco Brenner’s professional future. Among the clients listed are the reigning world champion Mads Pedersen from Denmark, or the German professional cyclist Rick Zabel.

Brenner has dominated the young generation of his year for years

Marco Brenner has been on the big teams scouting lists for a long time. He has dominated the junior racing scene in his class for years. The trophy cabinet in his parents' apartment in Jakobervorstadt can hardly hold the many trophies. He has won almost 100 victories in various junior classes so far. This year, for example, he became a German junior champion in the individual time trial and on the road. He won three stages of the prestigious “Giro della Lunigiana” tour in Italy, the World Cup classification, the overall ranking of the Upper Austria tour and the Tour du Pays de Vaud in Switzerland.

"Marco is certainly one of the greatest talents in road cycling in the past ten years," says Patrick Moster, the competitive sports director at the Association of German Cyclists (BDR). The 52-year-old from the Palatinate region is not considered an euphoric person, but when he talks about Brenner, he becomes enthusiastic: "His physiological requirements are enormous." Even Jan Ulrich did not have such good results in performance diagnostics (for example, oxygen saturation) at this age. be able to show. These genetically determined advantages, coupled with the enormous ambition and zeal for training, make up the strength of Brenner.

Moster is certain: "You have to be careful with young people, but if Marco continues like this, he can definitely establish himself in the world class at 25, 26."

Marco Brenner's talent was recognized early on

Those who dominate their year in this way are often subliminally associated with doping. "Sure, someone says, what does Marco get to eat? And you don't always know exactly whether it's a joke, ”says father Christian seriously and, as evidence, puts a folder with dozens of pink copies on the kitchen table. A doping sample is documented on each individual. "In cycling there are some of the strictest controls of all sports", Christian Brenner is certain. And as a successful driver you are in focus anyway. "Marco doesn't go to the bathroom after the races, because he is actually always checked."

His father Christian discovered early on that Marco had talent. The 49-year-old was a very reasonable cyclist himself. First at the RSG Augsburg, then at the E-Racers Augsburg. At five, Marco was on his first mountain bike. "At the age of seven, he drove his first road race in Italy because it wasn't allowed in Germany at this age," says Christian Brenner.
Marco (right, with the World Cup bronze medal) and Mauro Brenner ensure that the cupboard with the trophies almost overflows.

For a long time he trained Marco and his two years younger brother Mauro himself. The whole life of the Brenner family revolves around cycling. Marco and Mauro grow up on the bike. Almost every weekend the family was and still is on the road when it comes to cycling. Mother Sabina Brenner-Dalla Pezza, 47, is the resting pole. She doesn't forget her younger son either: "Mauro is certainly just as talented, but Marco is just a lot more ambitious."

At 15, the Augsburg cycling community became too small for Marco. He changes to RSG Ansbach, later his brother also joins the active cycling community, which offers the Brenners a professional environment, especially during the races. Marco Brenner is known in Ansbach and was twice named Sportsman of the Year. So far, the public has hardly noticed his success in Augsburg.

80 kilometers a day are standard in training

Brenner usually does his training around Augsburg alone. "I often drive towards Altmühltal, via Thierhaupten and Rain am Lech," says Marco Brenner. The standard is 80 kilometers a day, if he trains his endurance, it is between 150 and 160 kilometers. He is on the bike five to six days a week, plus power units on the weight bench in the large hall next to the Brenners' apartment, which also serves as a workshop. But Marco is increasingly on the road when it comes to cycling. "It was almost 150 days this year."

He can still combine this well with his training as a foreign language correspondent (English and French) at the Inlingua language school. He graduated there in June. Then he fully focuses on his passion. “If I am a professional, I will continue to live here, but then I will be traveling around 250 days a year. Because the place of residence is not so important, ”says the 17-year-old with a surprising clarity.

With his signature, he becomes one of the youngest professional cyclists worldwide. And he already defined his goal as clearly as ten years ago. "I want to win the Tour de France or the Giro at some point." He doesn't laugh, he's serious.
They are talking about being competitive at the highest level when he is 25 or 26. Seems very reasonable. I assume they know what they're doing. Can't find anything specific about what time he would turn pro.
 
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They are talking about being competitive at the highest level when he is 25 or 26. Seems very reasonable. I assume they know what they're doing. Can't find anything specific about what time he would turn pro.
The newspaper claims he'll sign a pro contract in the spring, making him "one of the youngest pro cyclists in the world", but it's not noted as a direct quote from him or his parents, so could be just speculation from the newspaper.

Or it could just mean joining something like the Jumbo-Visma development team or whatever.
 
The newspaper claims he'll sign a pro contract in the spring, making him "one of the youngest pro cyclists in the world", but it's not noted as a direct quote from him or his parents, so could be just speculation from the newspaper.

Or it could just mean joining something like the Jumbo-Visma development team or whatever.
Yes, but maybe he simply signs the contract, but for 2021. So he can be the youngest to sign the contract, but not be the youngest to start his pro career. I was a bit confused and automatically assumed signing the contract = turning pro (at that time). But like Faserr already pointed out, that's not necesarilly the case.
 
If we look only at WT level he will be one of the youngest to start his pro career, if we factor in the actual date he'll turn 19.
Last year Evenepoel turned 19 in January.
This year C. Rodriguez will turn 19 in February, and Simmons in May.
However, Brenner will only turn 19 in August next year.
 
If we look only at WT level he will be one of the youngest to start his pro career, if we factor in the actual date he'll turn 19.
Last year Evenepoel turned 19 in January.
This year C. Rodriguez will turn 19 in February, and Simmons in May.
However, Brenner will only turn 19 in August next year.
That's why i said he can be. Not that he is (or isn't). It's possible he's the youngest ever to sign a pro contract, without having to be the youngest pro cyclist ever. I don't know if there have been younger pro cyclists, but i assume there might. In the 1930 or something, lol. If they even had a "pro" label back then.
 
That's why i said he can be. Not that he is (or isn't). It's possible he's the youngest ever to sign a pro contract, without having to be the youngest pro cyclist ever. I don't know if there have been younger pro cyclists, but i assume there might. In the 1930 or something, lol. If they even had a "pro" label back then.
Oh, they did. The distinction between professionals and amateurs was very important, going all the way back to the 1890s at least. The British in particular were very keen to keep things like World Championships (such as existed then) and so on the bailiwick of amateurs, and one reason they at first refused to join the UCI was because the other signatory nations were all in on pros. I'll have a look 'round to see if I can find some younger pros. Like you said, I'm sure they exist.

Edit to add: Okay, I thought he was pretty young. Eddy Merckx, according to PCS, rode his first professional race on 26 March, 1965. His birthdate is 17th June, 1945. So that doesn't quite do it, but he's in the ballpark.
 
You don't even have to go that far back. Keven Vermaerke, Karel Vacek, and Liam Holowesko all turned pro with Hagens Berman Axeon last year, only turning 19 in September (Vacek and Holowesko), and October (Vermaerke). However, they all kinda go un-proed this year, and according to PCS Holowesko never actually raced last year…
 
You don't even have to go that far back. Keven Vermaerke, Karel Vacek, and Liam Holowesko all turned pro with Hagens Berman Axeon last year, only turning 19 in September (Vacek and Holowesko), and October (Vermaerke). However, they all kinda go un-proed this year, and according to PCS Holowesko never actually raced last year…
For some reason i always forget that Axeon was riding pro, because i knew about Vacek and Vermaerke, but never considered them (in my mind) as pros.
 
Hmm, just found someone else (and no, I'm totally not looking through the list of "youngest riders" on PCS...), James Lewis, who apparently managed to turn pro with Barloworld back in 2007, despite only turning 17 in November that year. However, given that it was mentioned that Brenner can't turn pro before next year - the year he turns 19 - I suspect the rules may have changed a bit since then. Looking at Lewis' team list, which indicates that he didn't race from 2008-2013, probably a good thing.
 
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Hmm, just found someone else (and no, I'm totally not looking through the list of "youngest riders" on PCS...), James Lewis, who apparently managed to turn pro with Barloworld back in 2007, despite only turning 17 in November that year. However, given that it was mentioned that Brenner can't turn pro before next year - the year he turns 19 - I suspect the rules may have changed a bit since then. Looking at Lewis' team list, which indicates that he didn't race from 2008-2013, probably a good thing.
Don't trust pcs. They mixed up - again - riders here. James Lewis is an English rider (born in 1990) who was active on CT teams 2014-2016. James Lewis Perry is a South African rider (born in 1979) who was a pro in the 2000s, including 2007 at Barloworld.
 
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As I understand it from the German article he will either turn pro 2021 or perhaps only sign something that will assure a pro deal? Might also be that he joins a devo program and then turn pro mid-2022?

I think it's all speculation until its communicated. However I do think he's good enough to make the jump.
 

Google Translated:

Media: 17-year-old great talent becomes professional in 2021

In recent seasons, cycling has offered some crazy performances by purebred riders like Egan Bernal, Tadej Pogacar and Remco Evenepoel, and perhaps another wonderkid is on the way. At least German media writes that only 17-year-old Marco Brenner will become a professional next year.

Marco Brenner is only 17 years old, but this spring the young German could very well put his signature on a professional contract. That's what Augsburger Zeitung writes, according to Radsport-News.com.

In 2019, the German was a particularly dominant figure in the junior race of the world, where he won the Nations Cup races, Tour du Pays de Vaud and GP Général Patton, became the German champion on both road and single start and won a bronze medal for the World Cup in the fight against the clock. .

At the latter, Brenner, among others, beat the later world champion on the road and current Trek-Segafredo rider Quinn Simmons, despite Brenner being more than a year younger than his American competitor.

Brenner is running his second season for the U19 team, Auto Eder Bayern, this year, but according to reports, some of the sport's biggest teams are already jumping to secure the teenager this spring.

Whether the German, like Simmons and Remco Evenepoel, will skip the U23 class and step directly into the ranks of the professionals is still unknown.

However, Radsport-News believes that the most likely scenario is that Brenner signs a professional contract and will then run the U23 race on a breeding team in 2021.

Several WorldTour teams, including Team Jumbo-Visma, Team Sunweb and Lotto Soudal, have their own development team.
 
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always worry with early starters, thing that is so on Remco's side is how few miles he has on the clock upto now. Alot of these young superstars burn out
What is so on Remco's side, is his enormous engine. People look at the amount of wins as a junior, and often forget the manner in which he won. How many times did he win with a less than half a minute lead? If Brenner will ride next season as a junior, we can make a better comparison, since he's only just completed his first junior year. So far, none of the stage or 1 day race wins by Brenner in his first year, has been with a lead of over a minute (or anything close to it).

If we look at Quinn Simmons' stage and one day race victories in his 2d year juniors... : 4s, 7s, 20s, 0s, 12s (itt 12k), 46s, 5s (itt 14k itt), 33s (itt 20k), 18s (itt 9k), 52s, 15s (itt 6k) and finally 56s on the WCC. Not one win with over a minute lead. Only 4 with more than 30s.

Let's compare this to Remco's 2nd year junior: 37s, 3m17s, 1m28s, 49s (itt 27k), 0s (itt 11k), 1m17s, 3m26s, 4m38s, 2m7s, 33s, 24s (itt 23k), 9m44s, 1m35s, 0s, 12s, 1m11s, 1m23s (itt 27k), 1m25s, 1m10s (itt 26k). That's 12 wins with an over a minute lead, four of which with over 3 minutes. Only 4 with less than 30s.

To be clear, these do not include general classifications. Data taken from firstcycling.com.

This is what sets Remco apart. Not just the amount of victories, but the absolute dominance he displayed, and the absolute immense engine he has. Furthermore, if you look at his ITT wins as a junior, you can see that those are less stellar compared to his solo efforts. I assume this is because the difference with the competition isn't as big when they are "fresh". But as ITT's get longer, or in races where everybody is starting to feel tired, this is where he starts to make the difference.
 
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