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Teams & Riders The Remco Evenepoel is the next Eddy Merckx thread

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Should we change the thread title?


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Well I'm glad we agree on something, but it seems to me that salmon, avocados, certain dairy, nuts, pulses, and many other "fatty" foods are a part of a healthy diet regardless of whether you're a bike racer or a bird watcher.

The end result of the peloton's weight obssession is threefold:
a) we're testing and rewarding whose body has the weakest safeguards (not strength, speed, coordination, cunning, or anything else that sport is supposedly about)
b) amateurs assume they're supposed to look like Froome or there's something morally wrong with them (such as a lack of discipline)
c) "professionalism"

This is certainly not limited to cycling. A lot of marathoners bob along with the appearance of a meth addict...
... and sports like MMA or American football are obviously not healthy just by their nature.

I would actually be in favor of a minimum bodyfat for cyclists, although I'm sure that idea will get reflexively shouted down. It would somewhat remove the incentive for unhealthy behavior, clinical or otherwise, and while you could claim it's not fair, all rules are both totally fair and totally arbitrary as long as they're applied equally. Combat sports tend to have classes where a certain weight is enforced, and oftentimes participants do very unhealthy things to "make weight". But in some federations, the rules also stipulate a certain hydration level at the time of weigh-in to protect the fighters' health, so why not also require 6% body fat to protect cyclists' health? The UCI has already mandated certain other health parameters (blood values, hormone levels) in the past, so why not body fat or BMI? As a fan, this detracts absolutely nothing from the spectacle, and we don't have to ask our favorite riders, be they Remco or anyone else, to toe the line of mortality just to be successful.

Well I know that idea will never go anywhere, so in the meantime I will just keep rooting for the riders who I wish I could be like, and that's not the skeletors of the pack.
Hh, I like how I guessed that you would advocate for a body fat percentage threshold. It is part of the sport, some people can tolerate being extremely lean more easily than others. Just like some can tolerate high lactate better than others, or just like some have high VO2max. Sure, it is not healthy to be that lean but as I mentioned earlier it is not healthy riding a grad tour either or training so much for that matter. Would you like to see a limitation on the number of training hours as well?
You actually need to eat some fatty things...
Sure you do. But it seems to me that some eat way too much. I remember an Alex Dowsett video where he was demonstrating what his nutrition looks like. He was eating more than 100g of fats per day. And I suspect he is not the only one.
 
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That's because they didn't have a test for EPO and the limit was set to prevent heart attack, when they knew an illicit substance was causing the danger. Setting a limit on body fat seems like replacing a physiological constraint, as going too low will have an adverse effect on the body anyway and hence drop performance. So riders, unless ill-advised or stupid, won't go too low. At any rate, telling people how much body fat they can ride with, just seems like going against a main performance criteria of the sport. And for this reason, I don't see it ever happening.
Conveniently ignoring the bio passport here, which was implemented because everyone knows that it's easy to dodge the EPO tests.

The UCI also hands out health breaks for cortisol levels. Health break for low BF% is the same principle.
 

This is peak Remco weight, no one can tell me it's not

KttOAgs.jpeg
 
Its hilarious how Remco haters put in question the simple fact that he already won a Grand Tour.

Sure, Remco didn't beat Pogačar or Vingegård and Roglič crashed out while he was significantly behind Remco but that same season Hindley also won a GT without beating any of the top GT riders and I don't see people questioning his Giro win. As I don't see people questioning Roglič Vuelta 2020 win despite having been a 18 day GT won on bonus seconds.

A GT win is a GT win period.
 
Its hilarious how Remco haters put in question the simple fact that he already won a Grand Tour.

Sure, Remco didn't beat Pogačar or Vingegård and Roglič crashed out while he was significantly behind Remco but that same season Hindley also won a GT without beating any of the top GT riders and I don't see people questioning his Giro win. As I don't see people questioning Roglič Vuelta 2020 win despite having been a 18 day GT won on bonus seconds.

A GT win is a GT win period.

classic Remco Derangement Syndrome
 
Conveniently ignoring the bio passport here, which was implemented because everyone knows that it's easy to dodge the EPO tests.

The UCI also hands out health breaks for cortisol levels. Health break for low BF% is the same principle.
Ok, but what's the biopassport got to do with fat percentage? How can you put a minimum limit and not basically stop performance science from seeking optimal ratios between power per kilos? It's just too fundamental to the sport, in my opinion. At any rate, it will never happen unless a bunch of pros die from starvation.
 
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